Friends – Flor Williams to Lad – Aug., 1941

This is the first half of a letter written by Flor Williams, wife of Martin Williams, friends from Venezuela who also worked for Socony-Vacuum Oil Company. Flor is answering a letter from Lad. He has been home since early June and is quite concerned about his draft status.

APG - Flor and Martin Williams, Bob Ross, visiting from Trinidad, April, 1940

Bob Ross, Fl;or Williams, Martin Williams

Pariaguan

August 25, 1941

Dear Al,

Starting today, with you, I am commencing to make carbon copies of the letters I write to you boys, because it is becoming every day more difficult to keep track of who I have told what and when, and I am afraid that if I repeat myself too much my letters will become very boring. For instance, I don’t remember if I told you that the Baiz family has been terminated as of August 1; they left here August 5; all except Emy who stayed on for a couple of weeks more and left today. You can imagine how much we miss them socially; but medically we are probably way ahead, as we have a Doctor who, I am convinced, is far superior. His name is Delfin Aroila. We also have a streamlined nurse, very easy on the eyes, by name, Helena Rotundo; divorced, and has two little girls.

But, of course, the biggest news is that…….sit down if you are standing up….. Bishop is married! He did it while on vacation, without asking any of our permission; can you imagine? All kidding aside, though, I think it is grand, because he seems to have picked out a lovely girl, judging by the pictures he brought back. She is 22, her name is Dorothy Elise Schaeffer, although he says nobody has ever called or anything but Memphis; she is from Memphis, Tennessee, he knew her for years, it seems, although he had never mentioned her to anyone, as far as we know. Mr. Bartlett has promised that he will be able to bring her down for Christmas, and I am tickled silly over the idea because I was hoping that she will be able to fill the gap that Pat left.

Before going on with the news around here, which isn’t terribly much, I will answer your letter. The paragraph dealing with the Martin Williamses was very flattering, I must say, and I hope we can live up to it and Cecilia won’t be disappointed “when and as if” (as Mr. Sheldon would say) she meets us. We are also looking forward to meeting her, and seeing you again, and we certainly hope it will be before 1945. We had hoped to get away at the end of this month, in order to spend September and October up there, but they won’t let me go until Wardlaw returns, which won’t be until October, and as that is too late to do the things we want to do, and buy the things we will need for another two years down here, we are forced to wait until spring. At any other time we wouldn’t have minded this, but with things as they are, we’re not too sure what the spring might bring. At any rate, we already have the car, so that helps. We have also ordered, and hope to get soon, our new photographic equipment, namely, a new magazine load Kodak 8mm, a new projector, and a new screen. Whooppeee! I hope it comes soon.

Tres Matas is still with us and probably will remain for an indefinite period; for which we are glad, because he is a little “loco” and a lot of fun.

We hope you have by now acquired car to your taste. My driving has improved considerably, believe it or not, and I’m just itching to get my hands on OUR car. I’m going to try to get a driver’s license while up in the states, it will save me money when I apply for one here.

You ask about the radio frequencies and hours of our broadcasts here. Well, at 7:45 AM sharp, on 4.321 frequency, you will hear yours truly chirp cheerily “Good morning, Frank. Come in, please”. (I’m getting kind of sick of that little phrase, but haven’t found a good substitute yet). Then he gives the daily radio well report, which I take down and then repeat to him; we then give any messages we may have, and sign off, but communication is maintained all morning until 12; and again from 130 to 4:30 PM; only at 2 PM the frequency is changed to 8.642. If there is any testing, or anything else of importance going on, we have another report at 4 PM, as we’re going to do today because Anaco No. 1 is testing.

I’ll post the rest of the letter tomorrow.

On Wednesday, a note to Lad from Ted Human, married to his Mother’s sister Helen.  I’ll also post two short notes from Carl Wayne, of the Red Horse Service Station.

On Thursday and Friday, a two-part letter from Grandpa to his three sons in Alaska.


Judy Guion

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