Trumbull – Dear Shieks (3) – Aug., 1944

DPG - with Zeke holding Butch

From Dave:

Next Saturday – – the 12th – – we will all move from this company over to some company in the 34th Battalion. And then on Monday we will go out to the field for our final phase of training. CPX (command post exercises) is a sort of small scale maneuvers. The boys in cook school go out there and cook for us. Signal center clerks run signal centers. Radio boys completing their course run radios. Field linemen set out and maintain their wires. Poll linemen do likewise. The same is true for the teletype operators, motor mechanics, chauffeurs, truck drivers, engineers and anyone else I might not have mentioned. This final phase of training is three weeks long – – three weeks of Missouri woods, ticks, chiggers, rattlers and various other species that don’t hold too much interest in my mind, but I think it will be fun and anything would be better than school. You see, after I got back here from my furlough, although I still liked signal center clerk, I felt as though I knew all that they had to teach me in school (conceited) and I still feel that this last four weeks has been a waste of time. After CPX – – who knows? All I can do is to make a few wild guesses which would be based upon nothing but the Army’s ceaseless rumors – – which are more prevalent than ever before right now. The most likely thing that will happen is that they ship us out of here to a port of embarkation (maybe Reynolds in Pennsylvania, but more likely Beal in California) where we will be prepared to get on a boat and “see the world through the carbine gun sites”. If this is the case I may get a delay–en-route, and I may not – – who can tell? The other night I was on guard duty when a sergeant came out of his barracks with another man and called me over to him. He told me he had seen this man come into his barracks and pick up the sergeants pants. We questioned the fellow and he told us that he had moved into the company that morning and as he wasn’t thinking, due to the fact that he had had a few drinks in Neecho — he got in the wrong barracks. His story was very impressive and the Sgt. told me to let him go. The culprit left and I once again started walking my post. On an impulse, as I passed the barracks where the accused claimed to actually live, I decided to take a peek in to see if he were in bed. I went in to see and much to my dismay found that he wasn’t in there. I went back and told the Sgt. about it and then when I got to the guardhouse I told the Corporal of the Guard about it. The next day I found out that he was a crook and doing pretty well in the business throughout the whole post. For the offense which I committed (not turning him in) they could have court-martialed me – – not a pretty thought. As yet the culprit has not been located again.”

This sort of thing seems to be rather prevalent in this man’s Army. When I visited Lad in Aberdeen they had just had an incident of the same sort; and both Lad and Dick have lost valuable personal belongings. They should have a Sherlock Holmes detachment connected with each battalion.

Tomorrow, the final portion of this letter.

On Saturday and Sunday I’ll be posting Special Pictures.

On Monday, I’ll start posting letters written in 1940 when Dan and Ced are living in Alaska and Lad is still in Venezuela.

Judy Guion

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2 thoughts on “Trumbull – Dear Shieks (3) – Aug., 1944

  1. Judy, I found Dave’s account of military life, especially interesting. Obviously, everybody–especially soldiers, wanted the war to end so they could go home. That’s why the rumor mill was so prevalent. It was frequently mentioned in my father’s letters.

    Also, I witnessed petty crimes while in the military. It’s not a good position to be in. The question–turn the culprit in to authorities or not? In my case, it was either them or me. I’m not judging anyone– past or present. Situations are different. I didn’t take the blame, the CO wanted an immediate answer, and it would have reflected badly on me.

    • jaggh53163 says:

      Adam – Dave always told it like it was… his older brothers sometimes would bite their tongue to keep the peace. That’s one reason why I enjoy his letters so much.

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