Trumbull – Dear GOOD Boys (2) – Nov., 1940

Dan in white jacket in Alaska

Pge 2 of R-103   11/24/40

Dan: In days gone by, every time I planned to pull some sort of surprise on you, you sort of sensed it in advance and it now seems that either your senses are getting a bit dulled with age or else the old slogan of “keeping everlastingly at it brings success” is proving its truth. Even if I did not have to wait until you went to Alaska to see the fruit of my efforts ripen, I am glad I succeeded once, although after I learned you were the very one, by an odd chance, that brought the letter and check that set the wheels in motion, I gave up hope that this would be a surprise. Am much pleased that it worked out so satisfactorily and must give due credit to Ced and the dear old Sears Roebuck catalog. In addition to the uses of this book immortalized by Chick Sale in “The Specialist”, this marks a new chapter in its utility value.

Your definition of the historical novel being like a bustle – – a fictitious tale based on a stern reality, reminds me of a statement to the effect that steel wool comes from sheep raised in the Iron Mountains. With your note, I also received the check, and as you requested, I immediately acknowledged receipt by postal. Suggest you reread (or read, maybe) my former letter trying to answer very fully your previous inquiry as to the best way of remitting money. I still feel there is not enough risk involved in mailing a check to warrant the extra expense or registration. To make it even safer, as long as it is deposited in my bank, you might endorse it, as follows: “For deposit only to the credit of Alfred D. Guion”, and then sign your name; then if anybody else got hold of it, it would not do them any good.

Dick believes he has finally landed a job at the Underwood- Ellicott- Fisher  Co. on Broad Street. He passed a physical exam they required yesterday and is going down tomorrow to see if he can start in as stock clerk at a salary of $18 a week. He is planning to save every cent of it he can with the Alaska trip in mind.

Bruce Lee, with his young daughter and her Westport chum, a girl of about Pat’s age, came up to see us last night. Barbara (Plumb) and Jean (Hughes), Red (Sirene) and Donald (not sure which one), and of course Dick and Dave were here and they seemed to enjoy themselves between bouts with the old player piano and a showing of Lad’s colored movie films. Neither Bruce nor I have heard a word from Rusty for several months. Maybe he is still trying to sell a story to earn money enough to join you both. That course you are taking, while apparently very elementary, sounds interesting, and will at least introduce you to the several topics enough to enable you to decide whether you would like to follow up the acquaintance. I would like to hear further reports of your talk with Mr. Dorsh and his South American experiences.

And thanks, very much, old son, for your authorization to deduct $12 from your check each month. This will help out considerably, and particularly so at this time of year. I do hope your next letter will bring a definite answer to my inquiry as to what you want for Christmas. I’d so much rather send something that you really need or desire than in ignorance, purchase some article that either duplicates something you have already bought for yourself, or proves to be inappropriate for Alaskan use. As you said once before, I can order from Sears Roebuck, Seattle store and save transportation charges. But please answer at once if you have not already written on this point by the time this note reaches you. I suppose you boys celebrated Thanksgiving last Thursday. I am interested to hear how the customs differ in Alaska from the old New England way. Do they have turkey there or some other typical Alaskan dish?

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