Trumbull – Dear Son: A Christmas Poem and Alaskan Diary – Jan., 1945

Trumbull, Conn., January 17, 1945

Dear Son:

Table of Contents:

A Christmas Poem…Dan Guion

Alaskan Diary…Ced Guion

Report From So. France…Lad Guion

30 Seconds Over Camp Crowder…Dave Guion

Odds and Ends…by the Editor

It is a blessing that you boys have acquired a sense of humor, or maybe, and I say it in all humility, you have inherited a bit from your parents. Anyway, amid the stress and storm of war and amid all the hardships of life at the Dan in uniform @ 1945
front, lodged in abandoned German block houses, etc., it is mighty reassuring to know that you can see the funny side, as witness the following in a V-mail written on December 24th by Dan. It reminds me of a reply an old darkey, who in spite of having his share of life’s troubles, always remained cheerful, once made when asked how he managed to remain so cheerful and calm, “Well, ah’l tell yo’”, said Uncle Joe, “Ah’s jist learned to cooperate wid de in evitable”. Now for Dan’s contribution:

‘Twas the day before Christmas when all through the house

All the world was astir here, especially a mouse

And the flea bitten bastard with rodent-like gall

Dragged a bar of my chocolate out into the hall

And there in a corner with indecent haste

The candy became gastronomical paste

He was heard to remark as he slunk toward his nest

“Merry Christmas to all, and to you, boy, T.S.”

All of which is by way of meaning that, although Christmas is Christmas, it is not always possible to spend it as we wish – – because of the rats and lesser mice and sech like. However, (I said it last year and I’ll say it again) Next Christmas things will be different.   Dan.

Ced, from up near the Arctic Circle, reports on December 29 as follows:

The Buick is again performing its long neglected duties and does pretty well at it. There are a few bugs to be chased out of it yet and the way it looks, I may have to take up on the bearings a little later on, but I think I’ll wait

Ced Guion

               Ced Guion

until warmer weather. It seems that somehow or other, either from incorrect fitting or by misuse in some way, one of the rods loosened up a tiny bit in the first 100 miles. I didn’t drive fast but I had the spark set a little late and it tended to overheat a little. That, added to the fact that we had nearly 2 feet of snow at just the time I started running it, made the going very tough for a new engine. There is nothing serious at all about it but it was very disappointing after doing the job so thoroughly. It still lacks 285 miles of being run in. I installed the Stuart Warner heater which I bought from Carl and it really is swell on these cold days.

We have had a couple of extremely cold snaps down to 25 below on a couple of days, but for two weeks preceding yesterday, weather and temperature have been extremely and unusually kind to the Arctic dwellers. For some time now the frost peculiar to this section has been building up each night and gradually, completely shrouding all that is exposed to the elements in a gorgeous a blanket of lacy white. Right now when the sun comes out to peek briefly at Anchorage in its hurried course across the southern section of sky, I am privileged to look upon what I believe to be the most beautiful formations of this frost which I have seen in my four odd years up here. Everything, however ugly in the nude, is now resplendent in its new white drapings. Later however, the wind came up and blew most of the frost away. Christmas Eve I spent at the Morgan’s open house and at the Church, singing a Christmas concert with the Presbyterian choir. Christmas dinner was at Jerry Keene’s. The shortest day of the year has finally come and gone and now the days are lengthening again, although I haven’t noticed it as yet. I figured on calling you on the phone from here on Christmas day, around five a.m., catching you at ten, but found there was no openings until Thursday, and again New Year’s Day with the same report. At the night rate of $20 for five minutes and four or five dollars more on day, I decided it wasn’t worth it unless I could get the right time.

Tomorrow, the rest of the letter.

On Saturday and Sunday, more Special Pictures.

Next week, I’ll begin letters written in 1941 when Lad is in Venezuela working for the Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, Dan and Ced are in Alaska waiting for Dick to drive our with their new car. Grandpa and Dave are holding down the fort in Trumbull.

Judy Guion

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