Army Life – Lad Writes About Christmas, 1944 – May, 1945

APG - Langeres, France - 1945

6 May 1945

Pop – Old Boy !:-

How are you honestly feeling? I’ve had a cold which I got some time last week, but it is distinguishing in severity each day, and today I feel better than yesterday. In about a few days (that’s pinning it down, isn’t it?) it should be nearly gone. Maybe all gone.

Received a letter from Dan last night which he wrote on 19 Apr. so possibly by now you’ve already heard from him. Just in case, I think I’ll send the letter on and if you don’t want it you may give it to Marian. This week has been very much like one in March. Snow, rain and cold wind. A little sun. The first couple of days we had snow but since then, rain.

No letters from you this week, so I’ll probably get a couple during the coming week.

You remember, of course, the Ardennes’s break-through on Dec. 17th. That was a big factor in effecting our Christmas Cheer. Plans had been made for a party and a few of the fellows had made arrangements to eat with French families around here. At the time it happened, of course, we couldn’t write about it, and afterward, I decided to wait a while before telling it. Sometime after the break, paratroops landed in our vicinity, and all festivities were canceled, even to the point of limiting the consumption of alcoholic beverages, which you can understand, I think, and that condition existed until after New Year’s Day. The most probable time of attack, naturally, was Christmas Eve or December 25th.Therefore, although we were outwardly cheerful, there was an undercurrent of strain and depression which killed all happiness during that time. I think most of us feel that Christmas – 1944, never arrived, in the modern sense of the word. I’m regretful, but happy, that an attack never materialized. But we were ready. It’s time to eat dinner, and I’ll have to check the generators before I go so – – keep your chin up, Dad, and take care of yourself. Until the next – “au revoir”.

Lad

Tomorrow and Sunday, more early childhood memories of Trumbull.

On Monday, I’ll begin posting a week of l;etters written in 1941. Lad is still working in Venezuela, Dan, Ced and Dick are in Alaska and Grandpa and Dave inhabit the Old Homestead.

Judy Guion

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