Trumbull – Dear Fugitives From A Lumber Camp – The Trumbull Communications Exchange – October onth, 1944

Trumbull House - Grandpa and kids - 1928 (2) Little Driveway view - 1928

The Trumbull House prior to 1950

Trumbull, Conn.  October onth, 1942

(The date IS NOT a typo)

Dear Fugitives from a lumber camp:

It is difficult to estimate how many board feet of maple Zeke and I worked on today (I also did some cutting yesterday afternoon alone), but we made a good start on clearing away some of the fallen trees. However there is much yet to be done so if any of you boys were making plans to come back and give me a hand don’t let the above statement deter you. Last week Zeke took my axe home with him to put a good edge on it and brought it back this morning along with his wife and offspring. I had started dinner so at once Elizabeth took over and I thereupon doffed my chef’s cap and donned lumbermen’s pacs, figuratively speaking. We made a good start on the Apple tree near the old chicken house and on the big old Maple tree on the front lawn but where we really went to work was on the Maple tree near Ives’s fence and the big trunk that split off and fell on Warden’s roof. We have been at it pretty steadily all day, both before and after dinner and we are both pretty tired and blistered, so again this letter may be somewhat abbreviated. Incidentally, enclosed are some snapshots showing the hurricane damage.

Trumbull House - Maple tree taken down in Hurricane of 1944 - view towards litle drive way

Trumbul house - Maple tree taken down in hurricane of 1944 - loking towards road

Trumbul house - Maple Tree taken down in Huricane of 1944 (front porch steps

David Peabody Guion

The Trumbull Communications Exchange announces a letter from Marian and two from Dave, written on the 22nd and 25th respectively. The first announced his transfer to the 847th  S.T.B.  (Co. F) and told of numerous current rumors. The second, written three days later, told of his company being scheduled for six weeks team training when the officers assigned to the job arrive, thence to a port of mobilization, joining with a unit for three weeks more training, then to a POE (Port of Embarkation) for the boat ride, bringing this date possibly sometime in December. He adds: “You can’t be really sure what’s going to happen from one minute to the next (Ask Marian) so as usual we’ll just have to sit tight, make no calculations or plans and see what happens. After reading your quotations from Ced’s letter it occurred to me that right along I’ve been taking your weekly letters for granted, never realizing how much they’d be missed if even one week should go by without at least a note. Every time someone else writes they seem to take it for granted that I (and I suppose everyone else) already knows all the home news, so without your “News Events of the Week” written in your pleasant “Oh, Alfred, how do you do it?” style, we’d never know anything about the old home style. I for one want to feel at home when I get back there so I don’t want every change to be new and foreign when I get home.” Someday soon, Dave, why don’t you drop Mac a line and tell him you would like to see a recent issue of News to Youse — that he must have overlooked putting your name on the subscription list, etc., I have several times offered my help but I guess he doesn’t get around to it.

????????????????????????????????????????

Marian Irwin Guion

As for  MtF (Marian the Faithful), she writes that things go on just as usual. Lad is working hard at his instructor’s job, the promised photos will be on the way soon as packing facilities can be obtained. The hot spells make sleeping difficult. She recommends our seeing “Going My Way” with Bing Crosby, which we all had seen, Jean having heard it was good, and it certainly was. I think this inter-family movie recommendation is a very good idea. Marian said some very nice things about Dave’s reminiscent contribution, “And to think it came from an ancient 18-year-old!”

The war news about the Arnhem setback this week sort of puts a damper on the unbridled optimism. I have an idea Eisenhower is using the time that seems to mark a sort of lull to gather men and material for one great big push, one of those big doses of medicine he handed the Jerries when they broke through the Normandy front, a sort of Patton medicine, so to speak. And with that last as sort of a last expiring effort I shall take my weary bones off to bed although the clock says it is only 8:30. So, toodle loo for now.

DAD

Tomorrow and Sunday, more letters from Dave’s World War II Army Adventure.

Judy Guion

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