Trumbull – Dear Chillun (1) – Ced Starts For Alaska – December 16, 1945

Trumbull, Conn., December 16, 1945.

Dear Chillun:

Having been confined all day in my cell entertaining some streptococci firgidarius (cold germs to you), and not feeling in much of a mood to write anything to anybody, this letter will probably follow the pattern set by those of the last few weeks and be divested of that sparkling quality found occasionally in my correspondence and in Mumm’s Extra Dry, more frequently in the latter.

Ced in Alaska with airplane - 1940

Ced and his plane at Monroe Airport.

This old house of late has taken on a strong resemblance to the Grand Central Station with arrivals and departures following one another in rapid succession. Among the departures this week are two. The first was Ced, early last Monday morning accompanied by his brother, Lad, autoed over to the Monroe field, (Lad) watched him stow away his belongings in his little plane, waiting a bit for him to get the latest weather report from New Haven, and finally take off in the northwesterly direction, quickly losing sight of the little dot in the sky but hearing his motor for a surprisingly long time afterwards, so much so in fact that the proprietor of the landing field at first was of the opinion he was coming back again. A few anxious days passed and then on the 12th (Wed.) A letter dated Dec. 10th, written 8:30 P.M. from Oil City, Pa., brought the following good news: “I had a very poor day as you will guess by this letterhead. I bucked a bad headwind all day, had to sit on a field for a couple of hours waiting for the snow to quit and in general fighting the weather ‘til I could cuss. At least this is a nice clean town, as different as day from night compared to Alliance, Ohio. The hotel is clean and respectable and all the stores seem clean and attractive; the restaurants decent. It is on the Allegheny River between high mountains and at the fork of two rivers. Prices are reasonable and the air is clean and clear. The promise of good weather tomorrow and I shall take off about nine A.M. I hope that Danged wind will quit, tho. It is moaning outside the window right now.”

While Ced didn’t make Larry’s place at Milan (near Sandusky) Ohio, he came pretty close to it. Friday night he had reached St. Paul which is the last we have heard to date. The news today is that a cold wave is blanketing the country, which probably means clear weather for his on-to-Alaska continuation. When he left he was not sure what his route would be from St. Paul on so I’m hoping we’ll have a postal or something soon which will further enlighten us. Good luck to you, Ced, eat plenty of carrots so you can spot those landing fields, and happy landings always.

Alfred Duryee Guion

L to R – Alfred Duryee Guion, Marian (Irwin) Guion, Alfred (Lad) Peabody Guion, Jean (Mortensen) Guion, Aunt Betty Duryee, around the kitchen table after dinner.

As for Dick’s departure, before we can get rid of him in proper shape, we’ve got to get him here first. That happened soon after I answered the phone and heard a voice (disguised) asking for “Al”. Said Al soon thereafter departed to get some “beer” and came home with Dick. You can figure that one out yourself. Hardly giving us time to seeing him around again, this morning he and Jean started off in the Chevy for Camp Westover which is in the vicinity of Springfield, Mass., and where he is supposed to report before five tonight. If things go according to schedule he will by Friday, have discarded his Army career and return a plain Mr. The dinner table today seemed rather “minus” without Jean and Dick. If it hadn’t been for Lad and Marian it would have indeed been similar to the Grand Central at 3 A.M.

Tomorrow, I’ll continue this letter and finish it off on Thursday. On Friday, two more Christmas cards to Ced.

Judy Guion

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