Trumbull – Dear Dick, Lad, Marian and Dan (2) – Thoughts About the Trumbull House – January 9, 1944

This is the second half of a letter I started posting yesterday.

Marian (Irwin) Guion (Mrs. Lad)

And as for my newest daughter, Marian, the more I hear from her the tougher my luck seems that we haven’t had the privilege of really knowing her. She always writes such generous, effortless letters, cheery and bright. I rather think she is the sort of person who always sees the best in everybody and makes the best of everything. Her last letter says Lad holds out their prospects of their getting some place to live in Texarkana and Marian is making plans now to arrange her affairs so that she can possibly join Lad sometime in February.

January 6th was Elizabeth’s birthday, so we all piled into the old Buick, with the cake (I tried to get some cider from Boroughs but they have discontinued making it for the season), some presents, including those recently received from South Pasadena for Elizabeth and the kids. Zeke has quit working on the night shift at Singer’s http://wikimapia.org/32447173/Singer-Sewing-Machine so he was home also. The kids had gone to bed but they both came hurrying down the stairs in their Dr. Denton’s, and a good time was had by all.

The Trumbull House (circa 1928)

The Trumbull House (taken in 2015)

Dick’s remarks about the old house here at Trumbull remind me of something I have thought of from time to time but never got so far as putting it down on paper. I look on this place not exclusively as my home, if you get what I mean, but as belonging to Lad and Marian, Dick and Jean, Dan, Ced and Dave (and it would be Elizabeth’s too, if she didn’t have a home of her own), sort of a community owned affair, a place that is really theirs for as long as they want to make it so, a place they can come back to after this war is over, not in the spirit of coming home to Dad’s so much as coming back to their own home, permanently if desired, but in any event, just as long as they need to find what they want to do in the future peace economy, using it perhaps as a springboard to launch off into some new effort, with that feeling of security in knowing that they can always come back to try another spring if the first doesn’t pan out as expected. When you are all settled permanently in whatever and whereever you want to be and do, only then will I feel that the old home will have achieved its final function. I don’t know whether I have put across the idea in the back of my mind, but the idea is to build up a sense of possessive ownership and a feeling of security from a firmly fixed anchor, particularly at the time after the war when the confusion of thoughts and circumstances naturally attendant upon readjustment from war to peace activities, is apt to upset one’s tempo. What fun it would be if we could all live together here for a while, anyway. Then the Psalmist’s words might come true, “Behold, how good and how well pleasant is it for brethren to dwell together in unity.”       He doesn’t say anything about the sistren, and while that is generally conceded as more of an understanding, I guess we could manage that, too. Anyway, let that be the thought for the day, and make your plans accordingly. Here’s to the day when Brazil, London, Alaska, South Pasadena, Texarkana and (Camp Devens ?) all rally around the Trumbull banner, with the war only a memory and long years of peace and happiness and prosperity ahead for all.

With that cheerful note with which to start the new year, add a father’s love and blessing, and you’ll have a suitable message from    DAD

NOTE: The Trumbull House, bought in 1922, stayed in the family for 99 years and was sold in July, 2021. It was indeed a place where we could all live together. After World War II, Dick and Jean lived there until they bought a house in New Hampshire, Lad and Marian (plus the four children they had)  lived there until 1966, when Lad and Marian moved to California with their youngest, Lynn, after she graduated from High School, both boys, my twin Doug and younger brother Greg, were in the Army and I was away at college), Dan and Paulette (and the six children they eventually had) lived there for the rest of their lives, buying the house in 1964, after Grandpa passed away, and Dave and Eleanor (and the two children they had) lived there until buying a house in Stratford. 

Tomorrow, a letter from Lad to Grandpa and on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, a very-long letter from Grandpa to his scattered flock.  

Judy Guion

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