Early Years – Memories of Cedric Duryee Guion (4) – 1922 – 1940

After my Uncle Dan (Daniel Beck Guion) passed away in 1997, I realized that first-hand accounts of this particular “Slice of Life” would only continue to diminish over time. I needed to record the memories of my Aunt Biss and her brothers and share them with the family. This culminated in the idea of a Blog so that I could share these memories with anyone who would be interested in the personal histories of some members of The Greatest Generation.

Over a period of several years, whenever possible, I recorded the memories of my Dad and his siblings. 

These are the memories of Cedric Duryee Guion, Grandma and Grandpa’s third child and third son.

SOL - Young Ced on Porch

Cedric Duryee Guion

A bunch of us would walk over to Pinewood Lake, you know, it was all forested pine trees.  We’d play in the tops of those trees.  We’d go from one tree to the next.

We used to play the piano.  We had a player piano, we got it from Aunt Anne, she had it in New Rochelle and they didn’t use it anymore so we got it. (Actually, Grandpa bought it in 1913, the year he and Grandma Arla got married, and I have the original Sales receipt.)

The Young People’s Group in the church was led by Doug and Emily Chandler.  Long after Chandler left, we kept on with the Chandler Chorus.  The only two people who ever directed the Chandler Chorus were Doug Chandler and Laura Brewster.  He was good, very good with young people.  There must have been seventeen or eighteen kids.  He played the piano beautifully and we’d have these meetings once a week.  He played really jazzy music for us, too.  He was very fond of music, good music, and started the Chandler Chorus.  We had everywhere from ten-year-olds to sixty-year-olds, maybe higher.  Maybe not ten-year-olds, but we had young people.  We sang quite frequently.  We went all over the place, up to Shelton.  We were good.  In fact that’s where Fannie and I met. (Ced is referring to
Fannie Pike, from Stratford, who he married years later.)

Anyway, then there was this young group, as I said, our house was the center of activity all over town.  It drew practically everyone in the town of Trumbull.  Mother said every Tuesday night we could have an Open House for all the young people.  We would play the piano, and we’d sing.  We just had a ball, and then we’d have cookies and cocoa or something.  That was so much fun.

Dad took us down to Baltimore in one of the cars – must have been one of the Packard’s – to the Fair of the Iron Horse, this was the heyday of railroading.  They put on a beautiful show.  Dad drove us down and I know we had two flat tires, one going down and one on the way back.  It was a wonderful show.  They had all the old steam engines, the Sturbridge, and the Tom Thumb, they were the originals.  We sat in covered bleachers, and there was a huge stage, with water beyond the stage.  The old locomotives came in and people got out of the coaches, boats came in and out – it was wonderful.  The people war period costumes.  We probably went in the early 20s.  Dan, Lad and I – D’s’sad always did things with us.  Dick and Dave weren’t in the group, they were born later.  I had the big privilege of seeing a very similar show at the Chicago World’s Fair.

Tomorrow I will post a week of letters written in 1944, when all of the boys are in service to Uncle Sam. Grandpa is holding down the fort at the Old Homestead and acting as a Clearing House for news from – and to – all of his sons.

Judy Guion

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