Early Years – Memories of Cedric Duryee Guion (5) – 1922 – 1940

After my Uncle Dan (Daniel Beck Guion) passed away in 1997, I realized that first-hand accounts of this particular “Slice of Life” would only continue to diminish over time. I needed to record the memories of my Aunt Biss and her brothers and share them with the family. This culminated in the idea of a Blog so that I could share these memories with anyone who would be interested in the personal histories of some members of The Greatest Generation.

Over a period of several years, whenever possible, I recorded the memories of my Dad and his siblings. 

These are the memories of Cedric Duryee Guion, Grandma and Grandpa’s third child and third son.

CDG - Ced - 1939

Cedric Duryee Guion

I am one of those who brag about the fact that I’ve been driving cars since I was about ten years old.  I got my license – my mother died on June 29th and on June 1st, that same year, I turned sixteen.  I think I got my license on the 2nd.  At that time I had driven quite a few miles with a driver next to me – quite a few miles without, and much more off road then on.  I used to drive on that road along the cemetery.  When they put the cemetery in, there was about a 4 foot drop to the road.  At the very end of it, the drop-off was less and you could turn a car around where it was shallow and come back about halfway on the ledge to the gate.  We had a 1927 Packard Touring car.  I guess this was when Lad was working at Wells Garage and he was making a little money there.  He saw 1929 Packard Touring car – it was a beauty – and he asked my dad if he could trade in the old Packard and my dad told him, “OK”.  We didn’t like that because that was his (Lad’s) car.  Well anyway, I had the car.  This one day I drove up that road, I guess I didn’t have my license yet, I’m not sure.  I was trying to turn around up there and I didn’t have enough room.  I got the front wheel over the bank.  When it went over the bank, it lifted the back end of the car on the right side. Oh, no, I thought, it was about a foot lower than the other end.  “Oh, brother, so this is it.”  I don’t remember how I got it off the bank; maybe I used a jack and pried it over.  I couldn’t go back and I knew I had to get it the rest of the way over.  I finally got it over the hill and onto the road.

Lad worked at the Well’s Garage, the Well’s Bus Line.  He was their Maintenance man for years.  Later he ran two different gas stations in town.  The first was the Mobile Station, next to Kurtz’s Store.  The second was the Atlantic Station after it opened.

We had an old Waverley electric car in the barn.  Dick, poor Dick, got all excited about the war effort.  He thought, “Well gee, here’s this old junk and it’s pretty well shot.”  The Fire Department was looking for scrap metal.  Dick was very patriotic and he thought he’d give them the Waverley, and at the same time, help the war effort.

We still have a series of pictures of the old Waverley in the backyard.  Rusty and some of his friends, my mother and my aunts, all dressed up in these beautiful costumes from the 1800’s that were in good condition in the attic.  They all dressed up in these clothes we took pictures of them in the Waverley.  Rusty pretended to be the groom and Aunt Dorothy was the bride.  Rusty had this stovepipe hat on and all the ladies were all dressed up.  Of course, the Waverley didn’t have any tires on it but it looked nice.

Tomorrow, more of the Early Years as we continue with the Memories of Cedric Duryee Guion.

Judy Guion

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.