Peabodys and Duryees – Our Branch of the Family Tree (2) – December 6, 1939

This is the final section of the Duryee Family Tree with additions hand-written by Aunt Betty Duryee.

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Joseph Woodward Duryee fathered five daughters, Mary, Ella (my great-grandmother),  Florence, Lillian and Lizzie (who preferred Betty, Aunt Betty Duryee). 

 

Untitled-3 6

fr: Ella Duryee Guion, Elsie Guion; back: Alfred Duryee Guion, Aunt Mary and Aunt Lillian (Aunt Betty Duryee was probably taking the picture).

You can see Alfred that your genealogy is one of the best, and that you come from a long line of ancestors you can well be proud of. You may have a certain responsibility to live up to, but never forget that it is just a background after all, and that it is the character of the man himself, his life and achievements that really matters in his generation. 

Tomorrow and Sunday, I will continue pictures of the Trumbull House and The End of an Era. 

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Our Branch of the Family Tree (1) – December 6, 1939

This document was created by Aunt Betty Duryee from (possibly) her own research or at least papers belonging to her family.

 

Peabodys and Duryees - Our Branch of the Family Tree (1) - December 6, 1939

Tomorrow, I will be posting the last page of the documents Aunt Betty Duryee sent to Lad while he was working in Venezuela in 1939.

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – History of the Duryee Family – A Note From Aunt Betty Duryee – December 6, 1939

This is a re-post of last week’s letter to Lad from Aunt Betty which included  The History of our Family. I thought I might remind you of the sequence of events leading up to Aunt Betty sending this information to Lad.

Dec. 6, 1939

Dear Alfred,

It occurred to me while I was writing the letter I sent to you on Monday that perhaps you would like a copy of the History of the Duryee Family.

I hunted up my papers and had a copy typewritten.

You will see it was as I said that David (I don’t know who this is but my guess is that he was someone Lad met in Venezuela named David Duryee. Lad may have written to Aunt Betty to see if she know whether they were related.) may be descended from the ancestor mentioned in the paper and I think he also will be interested.  The crest is really not complete, it should have underneath a scroll with the motto (Future Promise) but in French, not English.  But I do not have the complete copy here.

Both on your Grandfather Duryee’s and Guion’s side you have a fine lineage.

Lots of love to you and my best regards to David.

Aunt Betty

The beginning of this history has two pages of illustrious ancestors from France, Holland and Scotland. I am not going to post this information but tomorrow and Friday, I will post  Our branch of the Family Tree, prepared By Aunt Betty Duryee, beginning with our original ancestor,  Joost Durie (Duryer, Duryea or Duryee). He was a French Huguenot who emigrated from Manheim and settled in New Utrecht, Long Island and then moved to Bushwick Long Island.

Judy Guion

A Few Days Off – October 15, 2021

For the last few days, my computer tech guys have been in the process of upgrading my computer. Not everything is at 100 % yet. I had planned on taking a few days off and usually schedule posts to cover any days missed, but that has not been possible. I will begin posting again on Tuesday when I return from a weekend get-away. You will hear from me then.

Judy Guion

Friends – Dear Al – Job Opportunities in Venezuela – December 4, 1939

Friends - Dear Al-Job Opportunities in Venezuela-December 4,1939

12-4-39

Wallingford, Conn.

Dear Al –

At last, after all these months, I finally found out why you didn’t answer my letter.

Well Al, I sat down one sunny day last spring, and wrote an eight-page letter just so some darn fool could turn over in a truck and mess up the letter so badly you couldn’t even read it.  That’s life for you.

It seems as tho’ last spring you wrote to Mr. Hagan telling him of the opportunity for trained men down in Venezuela.  In fact you were so convincing that I sat right down and wrote to see if you knew of anybody who could use me.

I don’t know if you know what I have been doing, so I will give you an idea.  I was operating engineer at the Connecticut Gas Prod. Co, of So. Meriden, Conn. where we produced oxygen.  This is, of course, all high-pressure compressors, etc.  I was handling air comp’s up to three thousand #/__.  I was also in charge of an old 4 cyl. 2 cycle Worthington.  Boy did I have my hands full there?  I would no more than get the breather valve fixed, when an old crack in the cylinder would open up and I would have to replace the cylinder.  Get that running a few days when the fuel pumps would go on the lam.  It was a lot of fun but a lot of headaches too.

I was offered more money by the Wallingford Ice Co. so I went to work for them.  Here I had a 2 cycle  15″x20″ Fairbanks-Morse and a small 3 cyl, 4 cycle 9 1/4″ x 14″ Wolverine to play with.  You must remember the engine, it was on the floor while we were at school.  When the cold weather set in the job blew up so I am now with the Wallingford Steel Co., but I am most anxious to get back to diesels.

Now what I hoped for, Al, was that you might know of some outfit down there that could use a man around engines, or that you could tell me where I could write.  I also wish that when you answer this, which I hope you do soon, you will give me some idea as to the cost of the trip down, and how much I will need to carry me over till I get located.  You might also give me an idea as to what kind of clothes, and how much of the same I will need.  I would also like to know what kind of country for a woman.  I have an idea I should like to get married sometime this coming year.  In other words Al, I would greatly appreciate any and all the advice you can give me.

Well I guess that sort of takes care of that end of things.  Now for a little news.  Since I am up in Wallingford, I don’t see many of the fellows or know what they are doing.  You must remember Walt Budnick, don’t you? he up and got married a couple of weeks ago.  He is still in the Bakery and I guess he will stay there.  I guess you know that George Strom is still with Mr. Hagan.  You know that Mr. Hagan bought a new house?  Boy he sure has a beautiful home.  Last week he bought a 1940 Ford.  He still sticks to the V8’s.  I understand that you fellows use quite a few of them down there.  That must be tough country on any car.  I finally got rid of my old Buick, and now I drive a ’34 Chev.  I can’t say that I am any too fond of it either.  It’s O.K. but it’s not the car that the Buick was.

Well this letter just seems to go on and on, but I think I had better bring it to a close.

I don’t think I will get a chance to write again before the holidays so I shall take this opportunity to wish you a very Merry Christmas and I do wish you all the luck in the world.

Please answer this soon as I am most anxious to hear from you.

Ever yours,

Dick

Richard W. Huskes

218 No. Elm St.,

Wallingford, Conn.

For the rest of the week, I will be posting a letter from Aunt Betty Duryee and her copy of “History of the Duryees”.

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Holiday Greetings From Grandmother Peabody – December 4, 1939

Grandma Peabody

Grandmother Peabody (Anna Charlotta (Westlin) Peabody, Mrs. Kemper Peabody). This picture was taken in 1914 shortly after my Dad, Alfred Peabody Guion, was born.

New Rochelle, N.Y.

December 4, 1939

Dear Laddie,

I have waited a very long time in writing and thanking you for your dear and welcome letter. It’s so long ago maybe you have even forgotten you wrote to me!

Your letter was one of the most interesting I have ever had, and all the family enjoyed it so much. You know I have been very sick, having had two major operations. The second operation was to complete the first. The only out-of-doors I have had since July 16th are four rides in the ambulance between the hospital and our apartment. But I think that in another two or three weeks I may be able to take a real auto ride.

Well, how do you feel about being an uncle? I haven’t heard from Elizabeth since I wrote congratulations to them. I hope she and the Raymonds are all fine.

You mention Biss’s marriage. Laddie, she could have done an awful lot worse. As I saw him, he seemed like a really nice fellow, and they certainly seemed very happy. They seemed really congenial, and all we Peabodys like him very much.

Ted and Helen (Peabody) Human) have been staying with us (Dorothy and myself) for some time. Of course you know, Anne (Peabody) Stanley and her children), Gweneth and Donald went to Staunton, Virginia, to make their home for a while. We are hoping they will spend Christmas with us.

Sometime ago I received a letter from Cedric saying they wanted to make us a visit one Sunday. Then he called up and said he had to work that Sunday. We were disappointed not to see them.

My letter is pretty tame compared with yours but there is really so little to write about. Everything is tame here.

I hope this letter will reach you by Christmas and that your Christmas may be very happy. I know we shall be thinking about you. I don’t dare to say I would like to hear from you again.

My love and best wishes,

Grandmother Peabody

Tomorrow, a letter from a classmate of Lad’s, wondering about job opportunities in Venezuela. On Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, a letter from Aunt Betty (Duryee) with a copy of “The History of the Duryee Family” enclosed.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Dave, Dear Dan and Paulette, Dear Ced (5) – A Note to Paulette – October 21, 1945

The final chapter in this quite lengthy letter from Grandpa to his family members who are away from home this week.

Dear Paulette: I am going to answer Dan’s letter through you, thinking perhaps if I send a copy to you it might happen to get through before the one I am also mailing to Dan’s Army address. (When you get through reading and understanding “American” sentences like the above, you can feel confident of writing me in English without hesitancy). Of course I and all the rest of us here are more disappointed than you know at not seeing you and Dan (and the baby) as soon as we expected, but these things do happen time and again during a person’s lifetime the only wise thing to do is to accept them philosophically, after you have done everything humanly possible to remedy them, and look forward to a happier day, and that is the attitude which apparently both of you have sensibly adopted and that shall also be mine. However I am as disappointed really as I could be in for two cents I’d turn my business over to Dave, hop a liner to France and visit you “somewhere in Europe”, possibly even kidnapping you and little Daniel, leaving old man Daniel to keep house for himself while you get acquainted with Connecticut. Maybe I won’t have to resort to such extreme measures but this might be taken as a warning, at that. The things you wanted on Dan’s list, as he has probably told you, were all sent in boxes addressed to Dan’s Army address. In one of the boxes was the wool for knitting babies things. I hope they reach you soon. The next things we send I am going to addressed to you at Calais, to see if they don’t make better time that way. Tell Dan that in one of these boxes also was the winter addition of Sears Roebuck catalog (and it isn’t Montgomery Ward) Dan asks for photographs of the family see you can see what a handsome bunch of people we are. I wish you could see one of Ced in Alaska dressed in trappers costume, sporting a full beard, which we have on a slide. Dan says he would also like a picture of his mother. The best one I have of her is one taken in Larchmont Gardens, a family group, showing all the children when they were little (except Dave who had not yet made his entrance). This I will also send in the next box that goes to you, and I shall also see what I can do about getting photos of the others. For several years past they have all been so scattered around the globe that it is rather difficult to locate any that are “tame”. Tell Dan I was glad to get the snapshot. He looks a bit thinner than he was when he left, as well as a bit more serious, due undoubtedly to his efforts to make arrangements for your homecoming, etc. His job does sound very good and, outside of its keeping you both away, I am quite pleased he was able to land it. In fact, if it is what he expects, I could almost get enthusiastic. Of course I’m sure everything is going to come out happily but it’s the waiting for it that is the hardest. Another thing, it is very seldom that Dan ever answers questions that I ask. I do want both you and Dan to give me quite a full answer to the questions asked of the lake cottage proposition, as I know you both (all) will get a lot of enjoyment out of this place in the years to come. His views will be particularly interesting and I would surely want to have them to consider along with others before anything definite was decided.

Before very long I should like to send to you and the family a box containing a few things to make your Christmas season a bit happier, and I would appreciate it, daughter dear, if you would write down a few things that perhaps you cannot obtain readily yet in France, that you would like to have. I would like so much to do this but it would please me much more if I knew what I was sending was exactly what you would like most. And don’t forget something for Father Senechal (Paulette’s step-father Maurice Senechal, a pharmacist), for whom I have a warm place in my heart, every time I think of that friendly letter he sent me. My best regards also to your mother, brothers and sisters, not neglecting to keep a great big share for yourself.

I will be so happy when I get my first letter in English from you. I am sorry I cannot write in French to lead the way, but you know the saying about teaching an old dog new tricks, particularly when the old dog is too busy making a living to take time off to learn any new tricks. Dan says you are pretty good at English, so here’s hoping, whether you write or not, Paulette, my dear, we love you just the same.

DAD

Tomorrow and Sunday I will post more pictures of the Trumbull House and The End of an Era.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Dave, Dear Dan and Paulette, Dear Ced (4) – News From Dan – October 21, 1945

Dan Guion, far left, working in France after his marriage.

Dear Dan:

I received your letter of Oct. 8th. To wit: “I have been transferred out of the 1539th and into the 19th Separation Depot where I am busily sitting around waiting action on the discharge ritual. I shall send you my new address when. Paris must get along without me for the next two or three days, after which – – –?. Chiche (Dan’s special name for Paulette) left for Calais Sat. A.M. You can write to her there, 8 rue de Temple.

And yesterday I received your Oct. 3rd letter, as follows:” Far-reaching changes have developed during the last week. Hold your breath – – here it comes:

(1) I shall not get home for several months – – perhaps a year – – unless some unforeseen event crops up. (2) Within a week I expect to be a civilian. (3) I have found me a job with the Army on civil service – – surveying for “Graves Registration”. I do not know the details of the job yet, but this is what I am led to believe: the work will be surveying. A base pay rate is $2100 per year. I shall get 25% more for overseas service plus extra pay for any overtime that might develop. The quoted total is $3417 per year! Lodging will be furnished by the government at cheap rates, and food, too. I shall be entitled to Army rations such as PX, officers clothing and QM Sales. It is supposed that arrangements will be made soon to supply facilities for the families of such employees as desire them. The work might be in any part of the European theater. Contract will be for six months or a year, with a clause stating that if the work is finished sooner, I will be sent home at government expense. If this does not occur until next summer, I shall be able to come home with Chiche and any additions to the family which might exist at that time. Until I know better what to expect, Chiche will live in Calais. You may continue to send me packages and mail through Army P.O. but I suggest that you wait until I send you my new address. You can imagine how disappointed I am at not getting home. Before accepting employment here I tried every possibility to get Chiche home this year, but civilian agencies (Cooks, etc.) say that they can do absolutely nothing at the present time. On the other hand, my job is a good one. It pays well and might lead to a permanent job with the government back home. It’s a good solution to a knotty problem. I write again as news develops. None of the packages has arrived but I suppose they will reach me later at my new address.”

Tomorrow, I’ll conclude this lengthy letter with a note to Paulette.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Dave, Dear Dan and Paulette, Dear Ced (3) – More Business News – October 21, 1945

This long letter continues.

DPG - Dave in uniform nexct to barn - Dec., 1944 cropped - head and shoulders)

David Peabody Guion

Now coming to Dave’s letter received this week (dated Oct. 8th) from Manila, he mentions how slow they seem to be sending boys home, even one with as high as 81 points. He asks if things at the office have improved any. Can you get help? Are orders increasing? What are the chances of getting new machinery?

Now, of course, I could take up the rest of the evening and my available supply of paper answering in detail all of these questions but then I would not have a chance to tell you the interesting news about Dan and the disappointment that goes along with it. However we’ll try to hit a few of the high spots on the business angle.

For the last three or four years, I have not made a single sales call. Every customer I have has either continued from old times, been recommended by some other customer or has seen our ad in the city directory or phone book. And if I may be a bit crude, this is a hell of a way to run a business. It does hold out rosy promise however, for the time when there is a young guy in, who, with the enthusiasm of youth, up-and-at-‘em spirit, will go out and do some aggressive sales work, for without any adequate sales effort or direct mail advertising, we can hold a backlog of business, it will stand us in mighty good stead when we start up a real fire. From a financial standpoint I have learned a very significant thing. We are better off on a profit and loss basis than we have been for 10 years and this, in spite of curtailed business, shortage of supplies, high taxes and inadequate help, which we have had to struggle during the past four years (and are still struggling for that matter). It is almost solely because the only laborers wages I have had to pay have been exclusively for work performed. No salaries, which quickly eat up profits in non-productive hours during the day. If you could find some worker who would be willing to work steadily from opening time in the morning to quitting time at night, and had orders flowing in regularly to correspond, then the income from sales would be sufficient to pay salaries and leave a margin of profit, but for the six or eight years when I had salaried help and a bigger volume of business than we have now, we always ended the year in the red. That, Dave, my boy, is one of the management problems that will be dumped in your lap when you take over. As for the help situation, the green, irresistible, unreliable, inexperienced people that will come in and work for a high salary would soon make for bankruptcy, so I am forced to hire mere children with no sense of responsibility, no business sense, no idea of dependability or sense to know how they can tie things up when they failed to show up after saying they will come in at a certain time to do a certain job, high school kids or even grammar school children, letting them do the routine while I devote my time to operations that require even the most elementary brain work. It’s exasperating and if I would let it be, nerve-racking and I would very much like to take a vacation from it all for a spell, but we hold the fort awaiting the arrival of the new commander in chief, and in the meantime we are not doing so bad. As for machinery, we are keeping the old stuff going and getting fairly good results by patching and replacing and repairing, but I am looking forward to the day when the surplus property release some of the equipment the Army has taken off the market for the last few years at which a service man, theoretically at least, would have a far better opportunity of obtaining than a mere civilian. Months ago I asked for a list of this equipment that might be available but in true government fashion, I got a letter referring me to someone else and promising the information, not a bit of which has yet materialized. Among the items I have tentatively put on this Wanted List are: a new power mimeograph, possibly a multility, new multigraph, possibly a varityper, a new variscope (or similar), a paper cutter, keyboard graphotype, etc. (I realize all this is very uninteresting to any but Dave and perhaps not too much for him, but I’m over it now). Dave’s letter goes on to tell about a symphony orchestra but I guess I’d better skip this and go on to the French Dept.

News From Dan tomorrow and I’ll end the letter on Friday with a note from Grandpa to Paulette.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Dave, Dear Dan and Paulette, Dear Ced (1) – Thoughts About Cars – October 21, 1945

Trumbull, Conn., October 21, 1945

Dear Dave

Dear Dan and Paulette

Dear Ced:

The above are the extent of my “foreign correspondence” this week in view of the fact that Lad came home again last night – – or rather Friday night – – on another six-day furlough and of course Dick’s furlough is not yet up, and as Marian and Jean are still living with their respective husbands and neither has yet “gone home to mother”, my world has considerably shrunk and is now rounded merely by Manila, Alaska and France. Further, the order of the names salutated (how’s that for a $64 word?) above is determined by the dates when respective letters were received during the week, except for the last-named, who still is suffering from paralysis of the typewriting finger. So, in an orderly way, let’s take them as they come.

Dear Dave:

First, let’s go back to yours of September 12th which I previously did little more than acknowledge. Events, however, move so swiftly that it takes only a few weeks to make a letter quite obsolete. For instance, your step-by-step instructions as to how Lad is to find your Manila office will probably not be needed, for although he has not yet been discharged, the chances are pretty good he will not be sent to the Pacific theater. Actually, he knows no more about the Army’s plans for him then you do. So, we just quit guessing and hope.

Next, and I quote: “I’ll tell you one of the D.P.Guion  postwar plans, submitted here for your approval. I am sending home $50 per month, but I won’t have enough to buy a car when I get home – – even if I wanted to spend my money on getting one. So I thought that I might take your car off your hands, use it during the day for business and at night for – – well, use it at night. You don’t like to drive, so I would do the driving and pay for the entire upkeep on it – – tires, gas, repairs, grease jobs, etc. what do you think?”

Well, here’s what I think. You are submitting the idea for my “approval”. Sort of a one-way street, isn’t it? If I don’t approve it isn’t submitted, I take it. In passing, I might remark, Dick has been flirting with the same idea. For instance, the other night he asked me how much I would sell the car for. The Buick people told Lad the other day that it would be approximately two years before the buyers they now had on their books could be supplied with cars (and that was before the strike). If we use the car for business for a while, which I think we will, the company stands the running costs, as part of the legitimate cost of doing business, and if the boss takes an occasional day off along the line of your previous suggestion, to make up for the 10 or so years he has kept his un-pretty nose close to the w.k. grindstone without vacations, he might want to use said car to go to the island for weekends, visiting friends or relatives, etc. In fact, looking ahead to just such a situation as seems to be developing, I, some years ago, at the time that fabulous prices were being offered for used cars for sale to Western war workers (and the used car market is still very good) decided that instead of selling Dan’s old Chevy, I would have Steve fix it up, knowing you boys would want some sort of transportation when you got home and that not a thing would be available except Dad’s car. That is what Dick is using now, and while it is nothing to get enthusiastic about, it runs and is a lot better than nothing. So, I think I shall retain title to the Buick for a while. Incidentally, it has just come home from the A.L. Clarke place (they now occupy the old Packard place on Fairfield Avenue., Ced, which you will doubtless recall) with a new clutch, tailpipe, etc. – – $50 worth of tinkering – – and with a few other things that Lad says can be done by himself or at the gas station, it will come pretty near being as good as new except for dented mud guards, etc. It is getting a real tri-out now, however, as Saturday morning early, Dick and Jean, Marian and Lad and Audrey pointed its nose toward Lake Winnipesaukee and right now, at 7:15 Sunday night, they have not yet returned. The autumn foliage right now is at its best, we are having a spell of Indian summer weather, and altogether it ought to be a very enjoyable trip for them all.

For the rest of the week, I’ll be posting additional sections of this very long letter.We’ll cover news from two of Grandpa’s sons who are away from home right now.

Judy Guion