Army Life – Dear Dad – Back to California – February, 1944

Blog - Lad's new address in Pomona, CA - Feb., 1944

Blog - Lad's telegram with new address and new insignia with four stripes - Feb., 1944

1416 Stratford Ave.

South Pasadena, Calif.

Box 491

Dear Dad –

Your “Valentine” has arrived safely and is a most welcome addition to our household belongings – and just think – no laundry problem! Such attractive paper towels are

Marian Irwin

Marian Irwin

really a big help and I’m a firm believer in using the placemats any chance I get. Thanks very much for thinking of me, Dad.

Lad’s package arrived, too, just in time for St. Patrick’s Day – and matching the day beautifully. He’d send his thanks in person, if he had time to write any letters, but Uncle Sam keeps him so busy that he only has time to eat and sleep when he’s at home. So I’m saying “thank you”, from him, this time.

We are still house hunting – but not very successfully. Last Sunday we combined house hunting with the picnic – it was a beautiful day for it – cloudy and a drizzle that was very much like rain! But we didn’t let that stop us. The house we were looking at was about 10 or 12 miles from the Pomona, and if it were on a more traveled road we would have taken it. It was really a weekend cabin – not too modern, but clean and quiet. No electricity nor hot water, but we wouldn’t have minded that. The only drawback was that if anything happened to the car, Lad would have practically no way of getting to Camp. And Uncle Sam is sort of particular about his being there on time and when he is supposed to. So we very regretfully had to say “No”. We have now acquired a trailer, so the next time we moved it won’t be quite so hard on the car. This isn’t the house variety, although we’ve threatened to get one of those, too. But our trailer is a two -wheel kind, about 6 feet long and 2 feet high and about 4 feet wide. It is very sturdily built, and is good-looking, too.

Remember my saying that I was having my allotment check sent to you and that you could forward it to us? Well it must take time to change the address in their files, for I’m still receiving it at South Pasadena. But you will probably receive the next one.

Love to everyone.

Lad and Marian

Tomorrow I’ll post a letter from Grandpa bringing everyone up-to-date on what has been happening with various members of the family.

Judy Guion


Army Life – Marian Writes to the Home Folks – I Took a Civil Service Exam – February, 1944

Marian Irwin Guion (Mrs. Lad)

Marian Irwin Guion (Mrs. Lad)

Wednesday –

Dear Dad, Aunt Betty and Jean – Ced, too – ‘cause I imagine he’s there also—

Life in Texas seems very serene these days. Not too much excitement, and Uncle Samuel has been keeping Lad so busy that he hasn’t had time to think, but he has gotten home every night so far, so I’m not complaining in the least – for that is much more than I expected. Don’t know how long this will continue, but just being near enough that I can see him occasionally is all I ask.

Valentine’s Day being our third (month) anniversary, we were going to celebrate, but Uncle Sammy stepped in and decided that Lad should work until 9 PM that evening. However, we did have dinner together, slightly rushed, I will admit. – but that in itself is an occasion! Just think of all the celebrating we are going to be able to do when this is all over!

Dad, we are sending you one of our wedding gifts that we would like to have you put in Lad’s safe deposit box. It is a $25 War Bond, and we don’t want to carry it around with us.

I took the civil service exam yesterday, so if I passed the test and they still need office workers, I may be working at the Red River Ordnance Depot. I should know the results the first of next week, so perhaps our next letter will tell whether or not I have a job. Being a lady of leisure has been very nice so far, but with no house to take care of, I’m hoping to be able to work at least part of the time, so that I’ll have something to keep me busy during the day.

I’m going to wait to mail this letter, and also one to Dan, in case Lad gets home early enough to add a few lines to them. He’s had to work every night this week, so far, so I’m not sure whether he will even get home – needless to say – I hope so – .

Love to all



P.S.   Sorry, Dad, but I better get this in the mail before you think a Texas tornado has done away with the Lad Guions! Received your letter yesterday – we were glad to hear that Ced has been deferred and are waiting in hopes that we will be able to see him before he returns to Alaska. If he left immediately, I guess he couldn’t stop off in Texas, for he would have been here by now, but if he couldn’t get a reservation until later this week, perhaps we will see him after all. Needless to say, we certainly hope so!

Lad has been working so hard he hasn’t had time to think, let alone write letters! Maybe next time – and that roast beef you mentioned had us practically drooling! How we would have loved to be there! In fact we got so hungry that we had a late evening snack. The best Texas had to offer was crackers spread with peanut butter and one lone candy bar! A far cry from delicious roast beef!

Love —


Tomorrow, a long letter from Grandpa, on Wednesday, another letter from Marian and on Thursday and Friday, another letter from Grandpa.

Judy Guion


Trumbull – Dear Rover Boys (2) – Dave Speaks His Mind – February 3, 1946

And Dave says: Jan. 11, Manila. “We got a message through our code room last night from Eisenhower to Gen. Styer and other base commanders stating that all men with 2 ½ years service and 45 points will be home by Apr. 30. All men with two years service and 40 points will be out by June 30th. This second group will include me. I have 32 points as of VJ Day and two years active service as of Jan. 13th — 2 days from now. The message stated that the plan was a must and a minimum. If the men could be released faster than they should by all means be released. After the 2 ½ year man leave Manila (in early April if they are to be in the states by the deadline), then they will start sending the 2-yr. 5-mos., then 2-yr. 3 mos., etc. I figure that I should leave at the latest by May 15th, getting me home about June 15th. If we keep bringing pressure to bear on Washington it can be sooner than that. If we’re actually needed over here “for the good of the country” then I’m the last one on earth that would ask to be allowed to go home, but I think that if the Govt. had worked for weeks they couldn’t have thought of a poorer excuse than to say they don’t have replacements. I may sound cynical but I think that if there is really a dire need for us out here the government could have given us a better reason for keeping us here — even granting that the real reason may be a diplomatic or military secret. Therefore, I’ve come to the conclusion that politics of one sort or another has entered into the matter. I hope I’m wrong but I’ll have to have proof to the contrary if I’m to believe anything else. (Here follows some comments about work at the office) I got your “book” on Christmas activities at Trumbull. I especially liked the part about Marty. There should be more people in this world like him. I hope “growing up” doesn’t change him. I’m in for T/4 again. Some of these days it will come through. This is the 4th or 5th time I’ve gone in for it. (In a letter written the next day Dave says the rating did come through). Do you remember some time ago I had a large filling put in one of my teeth? Well it came out before we landed on Okinawa. (Teeth chattering that much, Dave?) It therefore

Page 3   2/3/46

has to come out. My appointment for the dentist today was canceled due to the fact that a Major asked him to do something for him this morning. So now I have to think about how much I don’t want to get my tooth pulled, from now until Monday. I intend to write Lad and Marian to congratulate them, etc., but I know myself too well, so I’ll say it here. “Congratulations to you both! (Or should I say to you three). Here’s wishing you all (that’s leaving it open for more additions) every kind of happiness throughout all the years to come. Love. Dave.

Last night we here discussed plans for the forthcoming house to be erected on the Island and Dick and Marian thought it would be a good idea if they now all pooled their respective ideas (Ced and Dick talked the thing over pretty thoroughly last time Ced was on) and arrived at something more concrete that might form the basis for a place representing the composite of everyone’s ideas. That will leave Dan and Dave yet to be heard from, and when I say Dan, of course I also include Paulette. With Spring now so far off and building materials possibly more generally available, it might not be too soon to look into the preliminary phases of the matter. Financing, of course, is one of the first things to consider and before we can get anywhere with this phase of the matter, we have to have more or less of an idea what the structure will cost and as this will be determined by the size, style, character of building, etc., it behooves us to get our ideas pretty well pooled and in agreement, so open up, ye “furriners” and let us have your European and Asiatic ideas before the crocuses start out of the ground.

Things here are going along as usual. Strikes still occupy news headlines, food shortages, certain articles of clothing, notably men’s shirts and women’s hosiery, still are bothersome, but by the time you get back perhaps things will be more normal. Jean and Dick this afternoon have gone over to visit their in-laws and Lad and Marian have invited Aunt Betty and myself to go to the movies with them — The Bells of St. Mary’s” I believe it is, which means that I shall now have to write finis to this, my weekly offering, and with hope in my heart and a great deal of love and good wishes to you all, subscribe myself, as usual, the same old


I’ll finish out the week with another letter from Grandpa to DB, CD and DP, the boys who are not in Trumbull.

On Saturday and Sunday, Special Pictures.

Judy Guion


Army Life – Hello! Everyone at Home – Birthday Gifts For Lad – February, 1944


Hello! Everyone at Home –

Here we are “deep in the heart of Texas”, and altho’ it isn’t a place that we would choose to build our own home, at least it isn’t too bad. I know that it is quite disconcerting to Lad, but I’ve taught school for three years in a place in California that is exactly like this, so I know what to expect. And as long as it is possible, I intend to stay with Lad, no matter where he is sent.

For the time being we are staying at a fairly nice Auto Court – The Blue Streak! (Room and bath, if you please!) And have our application in at the Federal Housing Tract which is near. We could move in right away, if we had furniture, or wanted to buy it, but we don’t want to get anything right now, so we have to wait until they can furnish some more of the houses.

We are about 5 miles from Camp, and except when he has a night hike or C.2. (?) scheduled, Lad can get home practically every night. Just so that I will have something to do during the day, I am going to try to get some kind of a job. Exactly what, I don’t know, but am going to see about it in a few days.

Lad’s training is really strenuous, and what with the wet, rainy weather we have been having, is none too pleasant. He doesn’t complain however and I’m so glad to be here that the water could be a foot deep outside and I wouldn’t even notice. It rains in California, too – the Chamber of Commerce, notwithstanding!

We don’t know what our mailing address will be, so for the time being continue to send those very interesting letters of yours to Lad’s address at Camp.

I forgot to warn you, Dad, that I was sending some of Lad’s things home – they are things that can just be stored until he gets there to sort them out.

We think your suggestion about a picture is an excellent one – in fact, we had it in mind to do as soon as we were settled – so we will send one to you as soon as we can.


Needless to say, I’m extremely glad Marian is here. It makes Texas quite a bit nicer, and she apparently likes it better than I had dared hope. Now you all may get a little more attention from me again. Since Marion wrote, we have acquired a mailing address. It is Box 154, Hooks, Texas.

Our basic training should end this Saturday and on Monday we will begin our 11 weeks of technical training. I am to help out with the instruction, along with 8 or 10 others. I’m supposed to sort of cram automotive electricity into the already cluttered brains of the trainees. It seems that this post is slightly understaffed for a Bn. as large as this. But everyone is glad Basic is nearly finished. We have our inspection tomorrow, and to be on the ball I’ve got to get some sleep so —– Laddie


Dad – I have a Valentine for you, but until we can get suitable packing material I shall have to wait to mail it to you. But it is coming –

With all our love,




P.S. – Fellow conspirator –

I received your letter in the mail tonight and I honestly don’t know what to tell you to get Lad for his birthday. Everything in the way of clothes that he needs is issued to him – and the Army has specific ideas about the type they should be. He does need some plain white (no initial) handkerchiefs – the kind that don’t have much of a border on them. And he wants a small sewing kit – and I do mean small. No bigger than the size of a spool of thread – with needles and pins and tiny spools of black, white or khaki colored thread. I have been unable to find one here. He can always use cigarettes (Luckies) if you are able to get a carton of them – And some plain white stationary – (rather lightweight paper)

Practically the only things he uses outside of things issued by the government are his electric razor (still in good condition) and his fountain pen – (he has two of those)

You see what I mean? I realize that I’m not much help, Dad, but this is absolutely all I can offer. Perhaps you have a few ideas on the subject that would be most acceptable. I think you do remarkably well as it is.

Love –



Army Life – Dear Dad and Assembled Members of the Guion Family – Moving Without a Car – January, 1944



1416 Stratford Ave.

South Pasadena, Calif.

Dear Dad and assembled members of the Guion family,

I’m afraid that I’ve neglected you this past week – not in my thoughts, however – tho’ very definitely in regards to letter writing.

This business of packing sort of has me stumped. Here to fore,  Mother has always been on hand to forward anything I happened to forget, or take care of the many things I didn’t know what to do with. This time, however, I have to figure it out by myself – and not being able to move in a car is another handicap. Now I have to wrap everything or put it in a box or suitcase instead of just throwing it in the back of the car! It’s been so long since I’ve tried to move without a car that I don’t know how to act.

We were so sorry to hear about Ced. It must be very nice to have him home for a longer time than you expected, but I wish it were under more favorable circumstances. I sincerely hope that everything will work out just the way he wishes.

What a very interesting person Lad’s Grandmother must have been. I wish that I could have met her. Your lives have been just that much richer, haven’t they, by having her with you for as long as she was here.

I also received a very interesting letter from Aunt Elsie last week. She spoke of having been to California some years ago and having liked it very much. I’m looking forward to meeting her, and I hope it will be very soon.

Thank you Aunt Betty for your letter – I am glad the sweater meets with your approval, and Lad is the one who deserves the credit for the right size.

I’m surprised that I can get anything done this week. I’m so excited about finally being able to join Lad that I’m practically in a daze! Did I tell you that he has found a place for us to stay? Not too fancy, but that makes absolutely no difference.

With love to everyone,


P.S. You see, I took your suggestion about the green ink, Dad. I like it very much.


I believe this writing paper was a Christmas gift from Lad to Marian, but Grandpa actually printed it from Lad’s design suggestion.

Tomorrow I’ll post a letter from Grandpa to the Gang, then another letter from Marian (and Lad), and I’ll finish off the week with two letters from Grandpa.

Judy Guion


Army Life – Dear Dad, Aunt Betty, Dave, Dick, etc. – Lad is an Acting Corporal – August, 1942


APG - APG at D_____ ______ a_____, 25 June, 1945

APG - Lad to Grandpa - Acting Corporal - Aug., 1942

Aug. 16, ‘42

Dear Dad, Aunt Betty, Dave, Dick, etc.: –

I am now and acting Corporal, so address my letters as such in the future. It happened this way. Yesterday, being Saturday, we had our usual review and inspection. That was finished about 11:00 A.M. and we were told to turn in our equipment as soon as possible and have our bags ready for transferring at 1:00 P.M. (1300 o’clock) at 1300 we fell out and were assigned to various of the Technical or Basic camps or Battalions I was assigned to Co. C., 2nd Battalion. I got there with my duffel about 1400. It was only about five or six blocks so I made two trips. I reported to the 1st Sergeant and was assigned to the 4th Platoon and he told me to get my corporal stripes. So that is how it is. Since I arrived here after 1200 on Sat. the Co. clerk had left and I could not have a new pass made out, so I can’t leave the post until Monday, anyway, when the clerk will be able to type one for me. As to next weekend, I can’t say definitely as yet. I’ll try to let you know by Sat.

My car registration is in the little pocket below the dashboard at the right of the front seat. If those ration books are definitely marked as to when or what date each coupon is good for, will you please use the coupon yourself or put the gasoline in my car?

We have had rain every day this week and I don’t think this afternoon will be an exception. My love to all –



Army Life – Dear Dad – Lad Drives a Tank – August, 1942


APG - Aberdeen Proving Grounds insignia

Aug. 12, 1942

Dear Dad: –

Got back to Aberdeen with no mishaps except that I had to walk from the station to Camp. There were so many men desiring to get into Camp that I thought it advisable to rely on me instead of taxis and I’m glad I did. Some of the fellows didn’t get back here until after 5:30, A. M.

Monday passed as usual, but yesterday, after supper, I went back to the shops and applied for extra training. So last night I learned to drive a light tank. Sometime in the future I’ll be given instruction in operating a medium tank and also, half-track vehicles, very heavy wreckers, and tractors. I will be given a license to drive whatever of these vehicles I proved to be successful in operating, which is a start in obtaining a license for the operation of all Army vehicles.

A tank is a cross between a car and a tractor in its operation. The clutch and throttle, as in a car are foot operated. In a tractor they are both hand operated as well as the steering. Steering a tank is done, as in the tractor, by hand brake levers. They ride quite well, and only on the real big holes or ditches, do they bump or rock badly. I really enjoyed it.


Tomorrow a letter from Grandpa, to the truants,on Thursday, another letter from Lad and on Friday, Grandpa writes to his sons.

Judy Guion