Special Picture # 294 – Lad and Marian’s Trip to New Hampshire – 1945

 

After my Father returned from France but before he was released from the Army, he had a furlough and he and my Mom, took a tour of New Hampshire, with one stop at the Island. I don’t know where two of the pictures were taken but I believe one was on Lake Winnipesaukee and the other was at the top of Mt. Washington.

Lad and Marian next to the train engine at the top of Mt. Washington, New Hampshire.

Marian and Lad relaxing at their campsite.

Lad taking a quick nap at their campsite.

A friend, Marian and Lad boating on Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire.

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Trumbull – Dan’s Furlough and Dick’s Physical – June, 1942

 

Trumbull, Conn., June 28, 1942

Dear Boys:

Dan-uniform (2)

The big News this week is the telegram I got from Dan Thursday telling me his 10-day furlough had just been granted and to wire him 20 smackers so that he could pay his fare home. He arrived Friday about supper time but alas, having eaten something that did not digest so well along with hot weather, lack of sleep etc., he felt rather low upon arrival, but after heaving up what remained of the causus “belli” and getting some sleep, he attained his pristine condition and has since been luxuriating in doing just what he darned pleases to do whenever and wherever the fancy strikes him. No high-pressure parties or exciting doings such as you see described in LIFE as the typical doughboy on leave doin’s, but all that is necessary is for it to satisfy him. He has to be back by reveille July 4th and there is just a bare possibility I may be able to arrange things so that I can go back with him, stopping at Aberdeen enroute to check up on my other soldier. Of course what I should like to do would be to make this trip via Anchorage and drop in on my pilot son and find out why he doesn’t write a bit more frequently, but until they get that road finished I guess I’ll have to forgo that pleasure. Dan says he has come to place little credence on the many rumors that continually float around as to where his unit might be sent, but one which he hopes will materialize is a report they might be sent to Alaska to do some mapping work.

Dick took his physical at Shelton Tuesday and apparently the doctor found no reason why he should not be acceptable to his Uncle Sammy, so I suppose hefore long I shall be driving my third boy up to the Derby railroad station. Apparently I’m supposed to keep this up indefinitely.

As for your requests, Lad old bean, don’t you know one way to make me happy is to give me something to do for any of you boys. I only regret in true Nathan Hale style that I can do so little. Perhaps I will bring down with me what you want in the way of boxes, watch and coat hangers. If I don’t go I’ll mail them to you. On the battery, I called up Remington Rand and they told me they did not handle these anymore but did give me the name of a concern in the west to whom I immediately wrote for information, prices, but have not yet had a reply. I was a bit puzzled on the razor matter. You asked if we had one we could spare. I could not dope out whether you meant a dry shaver or a safety razor. If the former and you did not have a battery I could not see how that would help it, if the latter, you said the Army had furnished you with a Gillette, so I’m kinder up a tree on that one.

Aunt Betty

 

Aunt Betty says: “Give my love to the boys and tell them I think of them often even though I don’t say anything.”

For your information, Ced, Lad is out of the hospital. His stay was brief and on return to duty he was transferred to Co. D, 8th Bn. for his second period of training. It lasts 8 weeks and he will not be able to get leave until sometime after the middle of July. He is now being trained for a non-com rating and instructorship which means a pretty heavy schedule from _ A.M. to 8 P.M.

And Lad, I have been intending in every letter to tell you that the Gladstone bag with your clothes in it arrived safely. I had the soiled things washed and put away and your woolen outerwear hung in my moth proofed closet.

DAD

*************************************

This penny postcard from Lad to his father, Grandpa, was written on June 30, 1942 and post marked July 1, 1942. It was sent to Grandpa’s business address in Bridgeport, probably because mail sent there would be delivered sooner.Notice there is no zip code. Penny postcards really did exist.

APG - Postal from Lad at Aberdeen - June, 1942

APG - Postal from Lad at Aberdeen - message - June, 1942

Tues. Aft. 6/30/42

Dear Sir:-

I am trying to put 4 years of teacher training into my head in 6 days__!  Wow!!! I shouldn’t even be taking this time, but I have 10 minutes between classes for a smoke and instead of writing my lessons, I’m trying to tell you that this is the longest “letter” you will get this week. I spent Sunday in a little preparatory reading and didn’t write at all. I got your letter this noon and sincerely hope you can find time to make a stop in Aberdeen. However, I would not be able to see you if you come before Friday, I’m afraid. Also, there is a rumor that there may be a parade in Balto (Baltimore?). Saturday, and if so, I may have to go. If so, why not wait here for me to return? Anyhow – here’s hoping. I don’t remember if I mentioned the receipt of the $5.00. Anyhow I got it. Thanks. See you soon, and there goes the whistle – Lad

Tomorrow and Sunday, more Special Pictures.

On Monday, I’ll begin posting a week of letters from 1943. It is December and the is coming to a close.

Judy Guion

 

Army Life – Dear Dad – Moving Up the Ladder – June, 1942

 

APG - Letter from Aberdeen, Moving up the ladder, June 21, 1942 - pg. 1

APG - Lad's Letter from Aberdeen - Moving up the ladder - June, 21, 1942 - pg. 2

APG - Army Life - Letter from Aberdeen - Moving up the ladder - June 21, 1942 - pg. 3

June 21st, 1942

Dear Dad –

Please note change of address above. I have succeeded in the first step up the ladder, but it also has its drawbacks. I cannot leave here for at least five weeks. And then, between then and the termination of my second period of training, I might be able to get home once. At most twice. This second period covers eight weeks from today.

I am now located in the Cadre School, where I will receive the training for a non-com and instructorship. If I go through with flying colors, I have a chance at Officers Training. Our Co. Commander gave us a little talk yesterday afternoon and apparently we will have little time for anything but study. Therefore, please don’t feel slighted if you don’t hear much from me in the next two months. I’ll do the best I can, but study is going to come first. Our days starts at 7:15 AM and ends at 8:30 PM. Between 6:00 and 7:15 AM we clean house and shave and eat breakfast.

I got out of the hospital yesterday morning at 8:30 and upon my arrival at Barracks 2-Bn. 1, I was told that I had to be ready to move to Co. D at 9:00. I really had to rush to make it, but I did. I helped put up tents, we live in 12’ x 12’ tents, and heard a lecture given by our C.O. Other than that, we did very little except to arrange our own stuff and clean up around our tent. Six men live in each tent, and since there is no electricity, we can’t do much after 9:00.

Today, being Sunday, we haven’t had to do very much, but it has been far more than had we still been in Bn. 1. Our Co. is made up of 4 platoons, and I’m in the second. Each day one of the four is assigned to guard duty about the area, and today is plat. 2. Then Guion being right up near the top of the list, since 2nd plat. is made up of men in G,H,I,J,K & L, I am on guard at present, on relief # 3. I have just finished the first guard, 4:00 is 6:00 P.M. I go on again at 10:00 till 12:00 and once more at 4:00 to 6:00 A.M. More on Co. D of the 8th when I get a chance.

I’m sorry I never mentioned having received the hangers, but I did (7) and I would like some more if you can find any (6). The stronger the better, and only all-steel. And there are a few other things I would like. In repairing my razor, Schick did not do such a good job and I’d like to send it back again, and therefore, send me one from home to use temporarily, Fine, if not, just say so. The Army supplied me with a safety razor which I’m using just now. Also, since we have no electricity, I would like to have you send me one of those 110 V. Batteries. The only ones I have seen so far have been made by Rem. Rand Shaver Div. Maybe you can’t get one of those either, but I’d like to have you try. I intended to go into Baltimore or Philadelphia and get one, but I can’t get out of here at all. Another thing is my watch. I left it upstairs in the attic, on the little table by the N. E.  window near a book called “Semper Fidelis”. My Elgin came in this book (or box as it actually is) and you can use it for the watch. In turn I will send back my Elgin for cleaning and general checking I don’t like to ask you to do all of these things, but I was really planning to be home either this  weekend or next weekend, and now I can’t make it for quite some time, and it all has to be done. However, don’t put yourself out, as there really isn’t any terrific rush. I think that is all, at present. Oh!! No –2 things more. I took with me to Camp Devens, Dick’s Gladstone bag. Did you or he ever get it back with clothes of mine in it? And also, I would like three or four rather sturdy, but small, boxes, like candy boxes (1 lb.) or the like and not too shallow. A couple of inches deep, 4” to 6” x 4” to 8”. They will be used put loose things of like materials (shoe shining equip., etc.) in my duffel bag. We do not have footlockers here.

You asked me what “Addere Flamman” means. Literally, I don’t know, but I suppose it means “Flaming Bomb”, which is the Ordnance Dep’t. Insignia.

Well, I seem to have run out of thoughts, Dad, so I guess I’ll have to call it quits. Remember me to all and sundry, and good health and luck.

Lad

Tomorrow, a quick postcard from Lad and a letter from Grandpa.

On Saturday and Sunday, more Special Pictures.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Lad Writes From Aberdeen Hospital – June, 1942

 

Aberdeen Hospital – June 18

Dear Dad – etc.: –

Boy, am I soft. One night on bivouac and I got sick. A second night and I’m sent to the hospital. Here is the story. As you may remember, I had a slight cold when I left home. The first night in Devens (Ft. Devens, Massachusetts) didn’t help much and since then I have been going so hard that I have not had a chance to get enough rest. And anyway, Aberdeen is rather a humid place. Well, one day, my cold would be pretty good and then the next it would be worse, and I figured that if I could hold out until my first five weeks were up, I’d be able to get a little rest or even go to the hospital and get well cured.

We left Aberdeen Sunday morning as planned and got to our camp location about 10:30 A. M., attended a conglomerate service and started clearing land for tent locations. Went to eat and returned to finish cleaning. Pitched tents and prepared everything for the evening. Went for a swim in the bay and dressed for supper. Ate and had the evening to ourselves. I went down and sat on the beach until sundown and retired.

Monday – after a cold sleepless night on damp ground – most of the Co. had some sort of cold, some of their’s worse than mine. After calisthenics and breakfast, Co. A, & B attended a lecture ending with one on map reading and then a treasure hunt. I had no ambition and did not even come in 15th. Then lunch and Co. A & B started clearing the campgrounds where C & D had left off. Here I got a good dose of poison ivy. Since we had no water except in the bay and chlorinated drinking water, in order to clean up we had to swim so I went in again. Afterward, I really felt better. Then retreat, supper, a rifle check and another free evening. Watched a ballgame and saw Co. B lose to Co. A., then I retired.

Slept fine but got up Tuesday feeling lousy, and with a sore throat and chills. Had my throat painted and went on with regular work. By noon the chills were worse and I reported to the First Aid tent. Then I was told to pack my stuff and be ready to sail back at 2:30 with the mail boat. We left at 3:00. Got to A.P.G. (Aberdeen Proving Ground) at 5:00 and ate supper. Reported to hospital at 7:30 and was assigned to a bed (No. 18) in Ward 15. Was given enough medicine to kill everything I ever had or will have (except poison ivy) and went to bed.

Wed. I felt better but stayed in bed and slept most of the day. Given med. three times per day.

Today, my throat is quite sore, but I feel better otherwise than I have since I entered the Army. I think that with a little rest, I’ll be tip-top again.

Well, that is up to the present. For the future – – – I don’t even think that I’ll be released from here to make it home this weekend, but I’m still hoping. Nothing further as yet on my immediate future.

I’ve not received any mail, because it came out to the camp on the same boat that took me back, and it was not distributed until after I had gone. However, I should get some sometime today.

You had better not expect me home this weekend. More later – – my love to Aunt Betty and the rest.

Lad

For the rest of the week, I’ll be posting a letter from Grandpa to Dan and Lad, the only boys in Uncle Sam’s service right now, then another from Lad and a final letter from Grandpa.

Judy Guion

 

 

 

Army Life – Letter From Marian to the Guion Clan – Lad Sent to Texarkana – December, 1943

Marian (Irwin) Guion

Tuesday

December 21, 1943

Dear Dad, Aunt Betty, Jean, Dave and anyone else of the Guion clan who is present —

Last Wednesday Uncle Sam gave us a Christmas present that we find rather hard to take. Lad has been transferred from Camp Santa Anita to Texarkana, and he left this morning to drive there in the Buick. It isn’t an embarkation depot (Thank God) but as far as we know now, he is in a cadre that are being organized and trained for overseas duty. This shouldn’t happen right away, however, ‘cause it’s supposed to take from 6 to 8 months to get the company ready for overseas work. He is going to wire you his new address (the one I have may not be right) and will probably be able to explain a little more in detail just exactly what the setup really is. For the present, until he sees what the post is like and what housing conditions are, I am going to stay here. As soon as he can find a room, a tent or a packing box, I’m going to join him! We should be used to this business of being anywhere we can- after all, we’d only been in the apartment 12 days, so we shouldn’t be too much in a rut, and too used to domestic life. Somehow, we haven’t quite been able to see the funny side of the situation as yet, altho’ we should be able to very soon. Everything has been so perfect and so wonderful so far, that we are sure everything will be all right in the very near future.

In the meantime, we try not to think about the time we are separated, and are looking forward to the day when I can meet him in Texarkana.

Somehow, we hated to take time out to finish our Christmas cards (we are making them this year), but I’ll get them out to everyone even if they don’t arrive until the 4th of July! Our Christmas box to you also, was delayed a little, so we’re not too sure it will arrive in time for Christmas. However, we know you’ll understand, and we want you to know that the lateness of arrival in no way dims our Christmas wishes for you.

I find that I’m not as good a soldier’s wife as I thought I was so I’m trying to get a reservation home. I’ll know tomorrow morning whether it’s possible or not, but I rather think I will get there.

Lad and I had a wonderful Christmas celebration last night. We had our tree and gifts then, and although it wasn’t quite the way we had planned, at least we celebrated our first Christmas together, in spite of the fact that it was a little earlier than is customary.

I seem to have rambled on quite a bit. I hope you won’t feel that I am too blue or depressed. You do know of course, how disappointed we both are, but we have known all along that it might happen this way and that we would just have to take it and no questions asked. It’s particularly hard for Lad, though. They did the same thing to him last year and moved him just at Christmas time. I guess, however, that Uncle Sam can’t afford to be sentimental, and as his nieces and nephews, we all have to take things as they come and be cheerful about it. It can’t last forever!

I sincerely promise that my next letter to you will be much more cheerful. With love to all of you–

Marian

P.S. We both enjoyed your Christmas box, Dad. You do things just the way I like – (specifically- the little Christmas tree, candy and raisins enclosed with the gifts), Lad took them with him to eat along the way. (The food, I mean – the gifts will be used in appropriate places)

M

We also got a chance to play your Christmas record, Dad. Enjoyed it very much —

Tomorrow and Sunday, more Special Pictures.

Next week I’ll be posting letters written in December of 1945. Some of the boys are home now but Grandpa waits anxiously for news of those far from home.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Marian Writes to Grandpa – The Lost Has Been Found – December, 1943

Alfred (Lad) Peabody Guion

Alfred (Lad) Peabody Guion

Wednesday

12/9/43

Dear Dad –

The lost has been found! Lad’s picture finally caught up with us at – of all places – the Hospitality Center. It had evidently been there for quite a while, but no one knew about it, ’cause it was put away in a drawer. And we haven’t been up there as much as we used to be either, so that probably accounts for the fact that I didn’t get it.

I’m so glad it finally got to me and I’m just as pleased and thrilled with it as I can be. It’s an awfully good picture of him, I think, and 100% better than the only one I have of him that was taken out here in his uniform. Thanks so much, Dad, for your thoughtfulness in sending it to me. His baby picture is darling, and he had light hair, too, didn’t he? I commented on that fact to Lad and he said, “Yes, I’ve been lightheaded all my life, too!” See whats happened to him? But he’s mighty nice to have around, nevertheless.

Lad and Marian Guion's wedding - Nov. 14, 1943 - close-up with hat and coursage

Lad and Marian Guion's wedding, Nov. 14, 1943 (both standing)

Lad and Marian Guion's wedding, with her parents - Nov. 14, 1943

Received a letter from my sister yesterday saying that the pictures of the wedding have come back and that they’re very good. We are very anxious to see them, of course, and  are planning on having some of the Kodachrome slides developed into regular pictures. Will send them to you as soon as we get them developed. Wish you could see the movie films. Peg says they are very good too.

Peg Irwin, Maid-of-Honor and Marian Guion, Nov. 14, 1943 - with hats and coursages

We’re hoping to get up to Orinda for Christmas but won’t be sure until the last minute whether or not we can make it. At any rate, Lad and I will enjoy our first Christmas together, and will be looking forward to the time when we can all be “Home for Christmas.”

This office stationery isn’t too good, but I knew you’d want to hear about the picture right away.

Love to everyone –

Marian

The next three days will have letters from Grandpa and I’ll finish out the week with another from Marian to The Guion Clan.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Lad Wonders What the Army Has in Store For Him – June, 1942

 

Lad - 1943

June 13

Dear Dad: –

Excuse me for not writing sooner, but I have been trying to find out something definite as to my status with the U.S. Army. It looks as though I am to stay here for some time yet, and I can have a car here later, but it all depends on what the bank says as to whether I will sell it or not. In case I have to sell it, I’d accept $700 or even $675 in cash. I’ll let you more or less decide that issue. If this new bill goes through concerning the raise in pay for soldiers, I could probably pay $25/month, but not much more.

Today we finish our basic training and tomorrow at 4:00 a.m. we get up in preparation for departure at 5:15 on our bivouac. At the termination of this, our basic training will be over. Then there will be eight weeks more of technical training which will terminate my training and I will be able to bring down a car. But what comes afterward, I have not been able to determine. Possibly when we return it next Thursday or Friday and I’m transferred to another Co. for additional training, I may be able to get a slant on the future. If I’m not transferred next weekend, I’ll have a chance to come home, and in connection with this event, do you suppose you could send me $5.00? This bivouac sort of took enough cash for cigarettes, shaving equipment, etc., to bring my $9.00 pay down to is some too low to buy a round trip ticket. Boy, we all certainly put out plenty for $.07 an hour. We make, at present, $.70 per day, which is really quite small when all items necessary during the first couple of weeks are purchased, mainly on the dribble plan, a little now and a little then.. You have my permission to open any mail addressed to me, and do as you see fit. I think your judgment is reasonable.

Love,

Laddie

Tomorrow, a letter from Grandpa to his three sons away from home, one in Alaska and two in the Army, updating them on the happenings of their siblings.

Saturday and Sunday, more Special Pictures.

Judy Guion