Army Life – Dear Dad – A Birthday and an Anniversary – November 4, 1944

Saturday

 In Camp.

Nov. 4, 1944

Dear Dad: –

Since I don’t expect I’ll be able to get home for Marian’s birthday, I sent, under separate cover, a small bottle of Marian’s favorite perfume. I would like you to wrap it for me and give it to her on the great day (Nov. 11) or if a celebration is held, on that day.

Nov. 14 will be our 1st anniversary, and again, circumstances still being the same, I’d like you to get her an appropriate token of my appreciation for her. A bouquet of flowers or something – you probably have a good idea for this –, and any expense should be added to the sum already owed you by us. Marian will repay you as fast as possible beginning after her arrival.

She wants to get some sort of work and if you can have a talk with her maybe you might be able to give her some idea of what she should do. I told her to consult you on any problems which may arise so please try to get her to do so if it looks like she may be bashful or retentive.

I guess I didn’t tell you, and she may be there now, but she left here Friday morning with the Buick and trailer. She should be in Trumbull sometime before late Monday night. Her route followed US 11 to west of Washington DC where she turned east on US 211 and then from Washington DC to New York – US 1. From G. Washington Br. to Henry Hudson; Cross County; Hutchinson River, and Merritt Parkway. I hope she arrives with no difficulties.

I’m going to write her a letter which will give you all the news.

My regards to everyone.

Love,

Laddie

*****************************************************

APG - V-mail giving new address - writing to Marian only - Nov. 1944

In using the cable address just put my name and the code address. That’s all. As you have probably realized, I’m writing to Marian only and relying on her to keep you all at home, posted. I hope she is doing a good job. I also hope she is not in the way there or is not unhappier then she need be. I’ve not gotten any letters yet due to moving too fast. Laddie

Tomorrow, more Memories of Arla Mary (Peabody) Guion. Next week I will be posting letters written in 1939, when both Lad and Dan are away from home and working in Venezuela.

Judy Guion

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Army Life – A Telegram and Letter From Lad and Marian – November 1, 1944

 

APG - telegram asking for $35 traveling money for Marian -Oct., 1944

A D GUION

FONE BPT4-2928 DANIELS FARM ROAD, TRUMBULL, CONN=

HOLD CHECK FOR MARIAN CAN YOU WIRE $35.00 IMMEDIATELY TO MARIAN I GUION 303 LONGINO JACKSON MISS FOR TRIP TO TRUMBULL DEPARTURE THIRD=

LAD MARIAN

 

MIG - letter to Grandpa - Thanks for the $35., Nov., 1944

Wednesday

Jackson   11/1

Dear Dad,

What a peach you are to send the $35.00 so speedily, without any question. We thought that we could wait here until our first government check arrived but Uncle Sam began rushing things too much. Today (Nov. 1st) is the dead-line as far as Uncle Sam is concerned. All the wives are supposed to have gone home, and no more private cars on the Post. But Lad took the car today, anyway. He’s going to park it outside the gate, so that I can pick it up if he gets restricted. He called me this noon to say that he thought he would be able to get out tonight.

Just to be on the safe side however, we packed the trailer last night, so that it will only take me a few minutes to put the last minute things into the car and be on my way home.

Incidentally, Dad, I’m really looking forward to living there at Trumbull. It seems to me to be the best place of all, other than actually being with Lad, and think of the extra nice company I’ll have. Your comments and P.S.’s in your recent letters have made me feel that I’m really coming home, so that this doggone separation has one bright side, anyway.

I’m leaving here tomorrow or Friday, at the very latest. When Lad comes home tonight, he’ll know a little more about their coming restriction, I think, so that he’ll have an idea whether or not he will be able to get home tomorrow night. If he can, I’ll stay until Friday, but I’m pretty certain I’ll leave then. So if everything goes according to schedule, I should be home sometime Sunday, probably late in the evening.

APG - letter to Grandpa - Nov., 1944

Dad: –

Marian has told you just about everything it is possible to tell, so far. I don’t know anything further about tomorrow night than I knew last night. It is quite disconcerting to say the least to have to make plans when everything is so unsettled, but I can’t get anything definite concerning just what we are going to do. That, I guess, will have to wait until it happens.

Marian is a wonderful girl, Dad, so please take care of her for me. My happiness, and practically my life, is wrapped up in her. I know you will, tho’, even without my asking. Incidentally, her birthday (29th) is Nov. 11.

I get up at 0400 and packing the trailer last night kept me up until almost 2300 last night, so I’m so sleepy I can hardly keep my eyes open, so I’m “gonna quit” here, and as they say in Mississippi – hurry back and see us.

Lad

From the looks of things it might be later than Sunday before I arrive. Lad wants me to stay as long as possible – and I want to, too. However, it would make it easier for him, I think, if he knew that I had arrived home safely, so I just don’t know. The best I can do, I guess, is to say, “Look for me when you see me.” It won’t be very long before I’m there – Love from Marian and Lad

Tomorrow I’ll post a letter from Lad, letting Grandpa know a little more. 

On Saturday and Sunday, more Memories of Arla Mary (Peabody) Guion .

Next week, I’ll be posting letters written in 1939. Lad has been in Venezuela for over month and Dan has been there for about three months. Grandpa holds down the fort in Trumbull.

Judy Guion

 

 

Army Life – Dear Dad – Marian Writes from Jackson – October 26, 1944

Blog - Marian Irwin - 1942

Thursday

10/26/44

Dear Dad –

I wish I could arrange to have one day when I write to you and Mother and Dad, but somehow I always manage to hit a different day of the week. I suddenly realized that here it is Wednesday or Thursday, and still no letter written to you. And even tho’ they are often times just one thin page, I do like to write every week.

Altho’ I wonder sometimes just how I can make them interesting, or at least newsy. It seems as tho’ there isn’t much happening in the way of special events, and except for the now familiar “time bomb” feeling that is such an important item in our daily life, everything else goes along very much as usual.

The battalion has been issued new clothes, and they have been given until Nov. 1st to dispose of their cars, but it seems to me we went through this routine once before at Pomona, and look how long it took us to get out of there! Nevertheless, we are rearranging and packing as much as we can, so that I can leave here on a moments notice. We haven’t the slightest idea where P.O.E. the fellows will be sent to, but in case it is New York, or its vicinity, I’d like to be around there as quickly as I can get there, in case Lad has a chance to get away for even a few hours.

Unless we send you a telegram to the contrary, will you forward our check as soon as it arrives, the way you always do? But I think you had better send it to me at 303 Longino, in case the fellows are restricted and I can’t get in touch with Lad. He would have to mail it to me and it would take just that much longer. Our other check goes to California so I’ve asked Mom to mail it to you. Will you please hold it there until you hear from us? For all we know, I might be there by the time it arrives, but we don’t know for sure.

Everything else is pretty much the same. We are having some lovely fall weather, but we need a good hard rain to clear the air and settle the dust. I hope it doesn’t reach the proportions of your last storm, however!

Love to all from

Lad and Marian

The rest of the week will be postings of letters written by Grandpa to all his boys – and Marian – regarding war news, local news and news of the family.

On Saturday Lad’s first letter home from Caracas telling of his first week in Venezuela. The story will continue on Monday with Grandpa’s letters to his sons so far from home. And so begins six and a half years of weekly letters written to whichever sons – and daughter-in-laws who join the family – are away from Trumbull. The letters are filled with news on the home front, news about friends and news from the boys – and girls – when they write home. This was Grandpa’s way of cheering up his boys and keeping everyone connected.

On Sunday, more Special Pictures.

On Monday, I’ll begin a week of letters written in 1939, when Lad and Dan are working in Venezuela.

Judy Guion 

Army Life – Dear Dad – Plans for Christmas – December 21, 1943

 

Marian (Irwin) Guion

Tuesday

December 21, 1943

Dear Dad, Aunt Betty, Jean, Dave and anyone else of the Guion clan who is present —

Last Wednesday Uncle Sam gave us a Christmas present that we find rather hard to take. Lad has been transferred from Camp Santa Anita to Texarkana, and he left this morning to drive there in the Buick. It isn’t an embarkation depot (Thank God) but as far as we know now, he is in a cadre that are being organized and trained for overseas duty. This shouldn’t happen right away, however, ‘cause it’s supposed to take from 6 to 8 months to get the company ready for overseas work. He is going to wire you his new address (the one I have may not be right) and will probably be able to explain a little more in detail just exactly what the setup really is. For the present, until he sees what the post is like and what housing conditions are, I am going to stay here. As soon as he can find a room, a tent or a packing box, I’m going to join him! We should be used to this business of being anywhere we can- after all, we’d only been in the apartment 12 days, so we shouldn’t be too much in a rut, and too used to domestic life. Somehow, we haven’t quite been able to see the funny side of the situation as yet, altho’ we should be able to very soon. Everything has been so perfect and so wonderful so far, that we are sure everything will be all right in the very near future.

In the meantime, we try not to think about the time we are separated, and are looking forward to the day when I can meet him in Texarkana.

Somehow, we hated to take time out to finish our Christmas cards (we are making them this year), but I’ll get them out to everyone even if they don’t arrive until the 4th of July! Our Christmas box to you also, was delayed a little, so we’re not too sure it will arrive in time for Christmas. However, we know you’ll understand, and we want you to know that the lateness of arrival in no way dims our Christmas wishes for you.

I find that I’m not as good a soldier’s wife as I thought I was so I’m trying to get a reservation home. I’ll know tomorrow morning whether it’s possible or not, but I rather think I will get there.

Lad and I had a wonderful Christmas celebration last night. We had our tree and gifts then, and although it wasn’t quite the way we had planned, at least we celebrated our first Christmas together, in spite of the fact that it was a little earlier than is customary.

I seem to have rambled on quite a bit. I hope you won’t feel that I am too blue or depressed. You do know of course, how disappointed we both are, but we have known all along that it might happen this way and that we would just have to take it and no questions asked. It’s particularly hard for Lad, though. They did the same thing to him last year and moved him just at Christmas time. I guess, however, that Uncle Sam can’t afford to be sentimental, and as his nieces and nephews, we all have to take things as they come and be cheerful about it. It can’t last forever!

I sincerely promise that my next letter to you will be much more cheerful. With love to all of you–

Marian

P.S. We both enjoyed your Christmas box, Dad. You do things just the way I like – (specifically- the little Christmas tree, candy and raisins enclosed with the gifts), Lad took them with him to eat along the way. (The food, I mean, the gifts will be used in appropriate places).

M

We also got a chance to play your Christmas record, Dad. Enjoyed it very much —

 

Tomorrow, a letter from Lad on board the Santa Rosa and mailed in Curacao.

On Sunday, more Special Pictures. Next week, letters written in 1944.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Dear Dad – The Lost Has Been Found – December 9, 1943

It is December, 1943. Grandpa is excited about the coming visit from son # 3, Ced, from far-off Anchorage, Alaska. Lad and Marian have been married for only a few weeks and Uncle Sam has a Christmas surprise waiting for them.

 

Alfred (Lad) Peabody Guion

             Alfred (Lad) Peabody Guion

Wednesday

12/9/43

Dear Dad –

The lost has been found! Lad’s picture finally caught up with us at – of all places – the Hospitality Center. It had evidently been there for quite a while, but no one knew about it, ’cause it was put away in a drawer. And we haven’t been up there as much as we used to be either, so that probably accounts for the fact that I didn’t get it.

I’m so glad it finally got to me and I’m just as pleased and thrilled with it as I can be. It’s an awfully good picture of him, I think, and 100% better than the only one I have of him that was taken out here in his uniform. Thanks so much, Dad, for your thoughtfulness in sending it to me. His baby picture is darling, and he had light hair, too, didn’t he? I commented on that fact to Lad and he said, “Yes, I’ve been lightheaded all my life, too!” See whats happened to him? But he’s mighty nice to have around, nevertheless.

Received a letter from my sister yesterday saying that the pictures of the wedding have come back and that they’re very good. We are very anxious to see them, of course, and  are planning on having some of the Kodachrome slides developed into regular pictures. Will send them to you as soon as we get them developed. Wish you could see the movie films. Peg says they are very good too.

Peg Irwin, Maid-of-Honor and Marian Guion, Nov. 14, 1943 - with hats and coursages

Margaret Irwin and Marian (Irwin) Guion

 

Lad and Marian Guion's wedding - Nov. 14, 1943 - close-up with hat and coursage

Mr. and Mrs, Alfred Peabody Guion

 

Lad and Marian Guion's wedding, with her parents - Nov. 14, 1943

My Mom’s parents, Mowry Addison Irwin, Edith (Rider) Irwin, Marian (Irwin) Guion and Alfred Peabody Guion

 

Lad and Marian Guion's wedding, Nov. 14, 1943 (both standing)

Al (Lad to family and friends) and Marian Guion

 

We’re hoping to get up to Orinda for Christmas but won’t be sure until the last minute whether or not we can make it. At any rate, Lad and I will enjoy our first Christmas together, and will be looking forward to the time when we can all be “Home for Christmas.”

This office stationery isn’t too good, but I knew you’d want to hear about the picture right away.

Love to everyone –

Marian

The next three days will have letters from Grandpa and I’ll finish out the week with another from Marian to The Guion Clan.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Dear Ced – The Lost Has Been Found – October 2, 1944

Marian Irwin

Marian (Irwin) Guion

Tuesday

(10/2/44 – JGH)

Dear Ced: –

The lost has been found. After collecting dust in the Pomona Railway Express Office for about eight months, your Christmas gift to us was forwarded here last month. And nonetheless welcomed and appreciated in spite of the long delay. Lad’s cigarette case was put into immediate use, and although the weather has been terrifically hot up to now, the last few days have cooled off sufficiently for me to believe that very soon now I can put my slippers to work. They are a little big, sad to relate, but I don’t walk out of them, so I intend to put them to use as soon as we have a frosty morning. Incidentally, do they soften up with use? And what are they made of? They look and feel as tho’ they would last a lifetime.

We had a very pleasant weekend this last week. (Sounds peculiar, but you know what I mean!). After various telegrams to and fro, we finally made connections and were able to spend most of the weekend in Little Rock, Ark. with Dave. He had gotten a three-day pass from Camp Crowder, and Lad had gotten a weekend pass, so, as Little Rock was practically the middle point from camp to camp, we drove up and Dave came down on the bus. We toured the town of Little Rock Saturday, Saturday night, and Sunday until now, when we had to leave to get back to Jackson. Now I’ve had the pleasure of meeting three of the Guion boys – two more to go. I could see more of a resemblance between Lad and Dave than I could see between you and Lad. I think I could pick them out as brothers from any crowd, but I’m not so sure about the rest of you. I hope it won’t be too long before you can all be together once more and I can line you all up to see who’s who.

MIG - Letter to Ced re Christmas gifts and Dave at Little Rock - Oct., 1944

Our life is still as unsettled as ever, but Lad’s hours are pretty swell so we don’t do too much complaining. Lad has been spending most of his spare time working on the car. Remember when we had to have the clutch fixed in Texarkana? Well, they didn’t do a good job of reassembling it. Consequently, the gears have grated and clashed for the last 12,000 miles. So Lad finally found the time and a garage where he could work so he took the whole thing apart and fixed it. She works like magic, now, and what a relief not to have all the noise every time we shift gears. The only reason we would like to go back to Texarkana would be to tell those garage mechanics what we think of them!

How’s the flying coming along? When we were at Little Rock, we went out to the airport for a while. Dave is most enthusiastic about planes and flying – and Lad always has been, too – so in that happy post-war time, you are going to be busy teaching your brothers to fly! Possibly me, too!!!

Thanks again for your Christmas gifts. If you can find the time, write and let us know what you are doing.

As always,

Marian,

P.S. Me too —-

Lad

Tomorrow I will be posting Dan’s impressions of his trip from Curacao to the Base Camp before beginning work on the road they will build between Caracas and Maracaibo in Venezuela. Sunday, I will be posting Special Picture # 339 from Grandpa’s early years in Mount Vernon, New York.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Dear Dad – Marian Writes A Quick Note From Jackson – September, 1944

 

??????????????????????????Thursday

Dear Dad: –

I’m afraid this won’t be a very lengthy letter this week. We don’t have very much to report. Life goes on just about as usual – night classes continue – and the weather remains as hot as it ever was. We had three downpours today, but they didn’t cool us off very much. The natives tell us that this weather won’t last too much longer. By the time it changes, we’ll be transferred I guess, so in any case, we shouldn’t get a change of weather.

Did we tell you that the long-lost package from Ced finally arrived? It has been reclining in the Pomona Railway Express Office for lo these many months. It was none the worse for wear, however – and the presence of Christmas wrapping in September didn’t faze us one bit. It was still fun to open the package. I received a furry pair of slippers – real Alaskan models, and just a trifle too big, but I don’t mind in the least. They are very comfortable, and the fur lining will be wonderful in winter – and Lad received a wooden cigarette case, with a propeller-like top which swings around to reveal the cigarettes.

We were a little worried about Lad’s being able to get gasoline to drive back and forth each day – they are most particular, here, and give out very little extra gas – But due to Lad’s persuasiveness and the fact that he refused to believe them when they said “No” the first time, we now have a “C” book and one less worry.

Sorry this is so short. Maybe we can do better next time.

All our love,

Marian and Lad

Tomorrow,a letter from Grandpa and I will finish off the week with a thank you a letter from Marian to Ced regarding the lost Christmas presents. On Saturday, more about Lad’s Voyage to Venezuela.

Judy Guion