Family – Dear Ced – Biss Writes a Short Note – March 31, 1944

Elizabeth (Biss) Guion Zabel

            Elizabeth (Biss) Guion Zabel

Friday afternoon

2:07 P.M.

3/31/44

Dear Ced: —

I am going to do a mean thing to you and write a very short note, as it is well into the PM already and I have touched nothing at all in the house. Besides I have just finished writing five other letters and am beginning to get tired. I wrote Alfred, Aunt Dorothy, (Peabody, Grandma Arla’s youngest sister) ) Uncle Burton, (Peabody, one of Grandma Arla’s brothers) Peg and Viv. Viv was disappointed because she didn’t get to see you while you were home. I am writing mainly to find out how you made out with your deferment and whether or not this new law, of all under 26, will spoil your deferment for you – I hope you will be able to hold off until June and maybe you will be able to keep out altogether.

I got a letter from Aunt Dorothy this morning and she is up and around again – that is what started me on this writing spree. I had been meaning to write her ever since I found out she was laid up. I am beginning to feel like my old self again, thank goodness. Butch is supposed to be in bed with a cold but I think he is out more than in – I have told him to get back to bed so far about 100 times at least. Marty just came in from outside with wet feet and pants so he has to go to bed as soon as he is through  in the bathroom. They’re going to have their pictures taken tomorrow night in their sailor suits. I wish it would get nice and warm out – we have had a couple of warm days so far and it just makes one inpatient for more of them. Marty is calling so I guess I had better close here.

Love,

Biss

P.S. – My arm is so tired it is stiff and sore – that is my real reason for stopping.

Tomorrow, another letter from Grandpa covering news of  family and friends. 

Judy Guion

Army Life – Letter From Dan to Ced – My Poor Salacious Siwach – August 7, 1942

Dan is in Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, being trained by the Army in survey work and his younger brother, Ced,  remains in Anchorage, Alaska, working at the air base there, repairing and maintaining planes and flying as a Bush Pilot. Before Dan was drafted into the Army, he was also in Anchorage,  living with Ced and working.

DBG - My Poor Salacious Siwach - envelope front, Aug., 1942

Cedric “Frump” Guion

Anchorage, Alaska

DBG - My Poor Salacious Siwach - envelope back - Aug., 1942

The Examination Stamp

DBG - My Poor Salacioius Sewach - Dan to Ced - Aug., 1942

letter written on yellow lined paper in pencil

Dan-uniform (2)

                              Daniel (Dan) Beck Guion

8/7/42

Roanoke Rapids

My Poor Salacious Siwach —

I again take up my pen(cil, sadly) with mounting misgivings, fearful lest the next letter from you, inspired by this one, will divulge some new heinous outrage perpetrated by you (and that handful of masculine harlotry living with you) against the gentle folk of pastoral Alaska.

But when duty calls, it always finds me right “on the ball” (eight) (or should I say “testicles”, to rhyme with “calls”?), Except when it comes to changing my luck – – – – I have decided to stop changing my luck, not because I do not need any better luck, but rather because I have learned, to my consternation, that these blue ball dispensing black belles are better un-bumped, taken from either side.

Kitty and Cortina:

If you or Kay can find any use in Anchorage for those records, or any potential customer (anything over $10), you may return them (or sell them). If they are serving no purpose, you might send them back home before the Japs mistake them for rye crisps and suffer indigestion !

Volly P. –

My best regards, and stick around! I’ll be back after the war if there is any after.

Rusty’s pipe –

The curfew tolls the knell of parting bedbugs. It is cheaper than conventional fumigation, anyhow!

Buick –

You are free to use your own judgment. Cars are actually worth less around here at present, but values will leap when gasoline and rubber become available and  new cars are not yet on the production lines. I suppose Alaska faces a similar situation.

Dad’s allusion about my being sent to Alaska – mostly the old A. D. imagination. I told him that rumors were extant concerning possible moves in the fall to foreign lands – – – – and Alaska was one meager possibility among several others, equally as meager.

My being pleased with the Army –

It’s malicious slander, that’s what it is! I like the place I live in. I like the survey work. I like the men who are on it with me, but my greatest pleasure would be to stand with my legs spread out and my cock in both hands, and piss on everything military, from the whistle at reveille until the whistle at “recall”, wetting down particularly the sections relating to discipline and silly military customs.

___________________________

I have become a part (1/4) of a quartet, during the last week or so, and already have performed for the royal awestruck congregation at the 1st Baptist church, and for the local version of the R.F.A.D. (the vice of the Golden South). Tonight we four shall offer unction to the oafs at some corny revival meeting. It is for this meeting that I must close this letter, for time is bisecting itself with alarming rapidity, and I must away!

Give my regards to everyone, even Rutting Red, the Renegade –

Really,

Dan

Tomorrow and Sunday, more about “Liquid Heaven”, with Special Pictures and Memories of our Family Island Retreat. 

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Dick – An Anniversary, Travel Woes and Roast Beef – February 13, 1944

Trumbull, Conn.,   February 13, 1944

Dear Dick:

Richard (Dick) Guion

     Richard  Peabody(Dick) Guion

Jean (Mortensen)(Mrs.Richard)Guion                                                                                                                           

Tomorrow for me marks the anniversary of my most highly prized and noteworthy official activity as Justice of the Peace — you won’t have to search far to guess why. (Last year, in early February, Dick received notice from the local Draft Board that he had to report for induction on February 20th, so he and Jean decided to get married before he left. A very hasty plan was put into effect and they were married on February 14th at the Trumbull House with Grandpa, a Justice of the Peace, performing the ceremony. They left for a few nights in New York City, came back to Trumbull and Dick was inducted into the Army.)  While your first year of married life has been spent under conditions as far removed from what newlyweds have a right to normally expect as they could possibly be, there are several aspects in the situation from which you might justly derive considerable satisfaction. As I see it, first, both you and Jean have been darn good sports about the whole thing — no complaining or indulgence in self-pity over your hard luck. Second, you may not realize it now but in later years you will both derive a sense of contentment in the realization that at considerable personal sacrifice, you have done your full duty and played a man’s part in a great worldwide struggle. Third, because of the self-denial you youngsters have faced so resolutely there is apt to be a corresponding compensation and an all the more lasting appreciation of a happy married life when it is all over. So, while on this occasion particularly you both may feel a bit resentful of the circumstances that keep you apart, there is always the dawn of a new tomorrow to look forward to, and one that will glow with more sunshine and comfort because of the present darkness. So be of good cheer. There are better days ahead.

Ced and car - 1940 (2)

Cedric Duryee Guion

For Ced this week has been one of quick changing circumstances. In fact fate has tossed him about in a way that reminds me of those movies you took in Alaska of the natives being tossed up and down in a blanket. Early in the week he received a notice dated February 3rd from the President of the United States, through the Anchorage draft board, ending his long period of uncertainty by ordering him to report for his physical examination on February 13th. On Friday, however, a telegram dated February 10th  arrived from A.G. Woodley, as follows: “Board has approved appeal. Suggest you return immediately to work as they cannot reclassify unless you are actively engaged in  essential work. Have a good trip. Regards from all.” So yesterday he hurried to New York to make reservations for his return journey. Up to this writing (6:30 P.M.) he has not returned so I cannot at this time give you more definite news as to his departure. Unless his present return routing by way of Texarkana is changed, it is quite possible he will be able to stop off to visit the new Texas branch of the family en route.

We have our upsets in civilian life too. By virtue of the fact that this was to be Ced’s last Sunday in the bosom of his family and Dave also expected to be home for possibly the last time before leaving for some unknown camp to undergo his basic training, I figured a reckless expenditure of ration points was warranted, so I blew in 50 Brown points on a piece of prime roast beef, done to a turn in the famous Guion manner, only to find that Ced evidently succumbed to the lure of the big city and a big snowstorm or other unknown cause has kept our little Dave for making his expected trip home. So Auntie (Aunt Betty Duryee, Grandpa’s Mother’s sister), daughter Jean (Dick’s wife) and Dad spent a quiet Sunday by themselves.

Dan briefly reports by V-mail that he is happy in a new job which, although temporary, is both interesting and educational, while faithful Marian probably has a letter on the way telling of her arrival. Lad, I take it, is too busy with his new training and getting a new home fixed up for his bride to find time for letters home. (2 pkgs. by express from L.A.)

Aunt Betty has her Accousticon (hearing aid) and is having a bit of a struggle getting used to it. I am waiting for tomorrow to see if a letter from Dave explains his failure to get home.

DAD

Tomorrow I will post a letter from Marian writing about her first few days n Texas. I will finish the week with another epistle from Grandpa to the Ex-Trumbullites (and Marian).

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Dave (2) – News About Trumbull – January 16, 1944

This is the second half of a long letter written by Grandpa to his sons and daughters-in-law with news of the family.

In Brazil, actions speak louder than words — anyway they did last week when there arrived addressed to me a most beautiful box of fine Brazilian cigars which I have since been enjoying very much, not only because the cigars themselves are good but because they came from Dick. And when I say “beautiful box” I mean just that. The wood is highly polished, the box well made and is far superior to any packing even the most expensive cigars in the U. S. A. are given. Your gift is truly appreciated, Dick old boy. Incidentally Jean has just received word from Dick that his base has been changed to another location in Brazil. Evidently they spell it Brasil down there.

Cedric Duryee Guion

And now here’s a newsflash just received from Alaska. Ced had made his reservation and was all ready to leave for Anchorage via Texarkana and South Pasadena, when a telegram from Woodley Airways arrived informing Ced he had been reclassified to 1-A, and advising him to defer his return until Art Woodley (Owner of Woodley Airfield and Ced’s employer) could definitely determine whether another deferment could be procured or Ced would have to be inducted. And that is the status quo of things at the present moment.

And now for local news broadcasts (at this point, Dave, I know you usually tune out, which is your privilege now, but you may under the circumstances stay tuned to this station.)

On invitation from the Lee’s, we all went down to Westport for supper Friday, and as usual, had a very pleasant evening. Ced showed some of the Alaskan slides and movies which they enjoyed. Incidentally, Dan, they have relatives living in London whom they thought you might like to visit – Arthur Toft, 40 Chaucer Rd., Herne Hill, London S.E24.

In today’s paper, Barbara’s (Plumb, Dan’s girlfriend) picture appears in the uniform of a WAAC with news that she has received an assignment to serve overseas.

Smoky has been under the weather for the last few days — either he has been

page 4 (oy, what a letter writer I am tonight)                                                    1/16/1944

grieving over your absence, or in your affectionate adieu,  you may have put ground glass in his Ken-L-Ration. However, he is improving as evidenced by the lowering temperature of his nose.

I’m getting to be a regular old rake — married three women this week — all divorced, too — on the 10th, 12th and 15th  respectively. Grandpa, as the Justice of the Peace, has the honor of performing marriage ceremonies.)

You older boys will be interested to know that in answer to one of my Christmas cards sent to Corrine Flaniken, I received a rather rambling letter from her enclosed in a letter from her sister in Arlington, Texas, stating that Corinne is in a psychopathic Hospital in Colorado Springs. Normal life is much too confusing for her as the slightest responsibility upsets her until she is almost frantic. A letter or card from any of you to her would probably be much appreciated. Address Route 1, Box 47, Colorado Springs, Colo.

And last, a letter from Aunt Anne ((Peabody) Stanley), thanking us for the flowers I sent Grandma, which evidently she appreciated very much. Grandma continues comfortable, and while she sleeps a good deal of the time, she is bright and cheerful when awake. She enjoyed seeing us when we visited her.

Donald, (Stanley,  Anne (Peabody) Stanley’s son), she wrote, is in New York and will be for several more days. Gweneth came down from Vermont and they all spent the weekend together. Don looks fine and is still enjoying the sea. (Donald, only a few years older than Dave, in in the Navy.)

And that, dear children, is about all from your Uncle Don this evening, except Dave, I think there is a present for you under the barrack cot, a big juicy paddle that the first Sgt. will be glad to hand you with much verve and spirit if you don’t watch out. And don’t try to make friends with the bugler because he’ll blow reveille just as quick for you as he will for the rest of the boys.

Remember, there is a brand-new folder in the file with your name on it, and the first insertion should be an essay on Army life from a rookies standpoint. I’m sure Dan and Lad and Dick would enjoy reading it and comparing the memory of their experiences with yours.

A glance at my watch tells me this is been one of those regular three hour broadcasts and undoubtedly others are waiting to get on the air: who knows, even Franklin may be waiting to deliver another fireside chat to “my friends”. Anyway, I’m signing off. This is station ADG, 7 on your dial. (A reference to the mailing address, PO Box 7, Trumbull)

DAD

Tomorrow and Sunday, more of Elizabeth’s St. Petersburg (Florida) Adventure.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (32) – P. S. – October 8, 1934 and March 18, 1935

These two notes provide a post script to Ced’s Amazing Adventure.

PEABODY - Helen Gillespie s note to Ced - 1934

Dear Cedric,

You don’t know how disappointed we were at not seeing you when you were in this part of the country this summer. I received your card and had planned on going down to Uncle Frank’s to see you when, according to our local physician’s diagnosis, Dale was overcome by the heat and the doctor refused to give his consent to Dale’s leaving. When we did get away you had left for the farm again and we couldn’t take time to go up there. We were terribly sorry not to have seen you and hope you, and the others of the family, will come this way again soon. (Dale’s trouble turned out to be atropine poisoning so wasn’t as serious as it might have been.)

Love,

Helen (Gillespie)

October eight

This note was mailed in Little Falls, Minnesota. I’m not sure how Helen Gillespie is related to Franklin Peabody and when I get some extra time I will try to figure that out. She may have been his younger sister, Helen Sophia, but I need to do some more digging to confirm that.

**************************************************************

Peabody - Putnam Burton Peabodys note to Ced re photo - 1935

PEABODY - Kemper Foster Peabody, - 1886

2011 Park Ave., Topeka, Kansas, March 18/35

Dear Cedric:-

I am gathering up, and sending out to my various kindred, a number of trinkets that might interest them. My years must be growing steadily shorter, – and I wish to place my treasures with those that will appreciate and value them.

To YOU, therefore, I am sending an unusually good photo – portrait of your grandfather (Kemper Foster Peabody, Arla Peabody’s father), taken when he was young. It looks exactly as HE did, those days.

I have never been more busy, in all the 79 years of my life, than I am, just now. Several hours at the typewriter, daily, and I am compelled to make EVERYTHING BRIEF.

But I send love to you all: with my very best wishes,

Faithfully yours,

PB Peabody

(Putnam Burton Peabody, oldest brother of Kemper Foster Peabody, Arla Peabody Guion’s Father.)

And so we come to the end of Ced’s Coming of Age Adventure in September, 1934. Ced’s next adventure begins in 1940 when he and his older brother Dan, back from Venezuela for a year, leave Trumbull to travel to Anchorage, Alaska, where they hope to find jobs. 

Tomorrow, I will begin posting letters written in 1942. Dan is already in the Army and Lad is expecting to be inducted in the next few months.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (30) – A Letter From Grandma Peabody – September 13, 1934

Grandma Peabody

Grandma Peabody

September 13

Dear Cedric,

Your welcome letter came several days ago. I am so glad you are home again because I could not help worrying about you.

I would certainly like to see you and hear of your visits and all about the relatives you visited. You must have had a great time

Did you like haying and threshing? I know all about such things. You should have seen us (the Westlin’s) carrying lunches out to the men haying, and to the threshing crews when that work started usually late in September, sometimes as late as October. The wind would blow and it was cold. The men were always so glad for the hot coffee, sandwiches and cake.

I believe I told your father I am moving to New York City in a short time to live with Aunt Dorothy. I am wondering if it will be easier for you to come to New York to make a visit rather than Ossining. We are all anxious to hear any news.

No news from here, everything seems to go jogging along as usual.

Lovingly,

Grandma

My love to all of you.

Tomorrow, I will begin a week of letters written in 1940, when Lad is the only son away from home.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (29) – Ced’s Plans for Coming Home – September 1, 1934

Ced is on his way home, with a few stops on the way. This will be a much quicker trip, First, because Ced has seen almost everyone he wanted to see or meet, and second, because he is anxious to get home and see the family.

Cedric Duryee Guion

Chagrin Falls, Ohio

Sat. Sept. 1

Dear Dad:

I saw Vivian and Aunt Anna before I left Star Prairie and they gave me five dollars to “have a good time on”. I got good rides all the way down to Madison Monday and Tuesday headed for Chicago and found cousin Rudolf there where he is staying. I spent Wednesday at Chicago with him and we went to the fair Wednesday night and saw The Black Forest and the “Standard Oil Line Power Show” and then went to the Ford building and saw their movie which was excellent and then we heard the Ford Symphony band.

I started for Cleveland Thursday morning expecting to get there by night but I didn’t get a ride until four o’clock in the afternoon. I had a terrible day of it and first went to bed on the road at 3 AM. I made Cleveland at three o’clock yesterday and here I am at Chagrin Falls. We are going to the air races tomorrow and I will leave for home on the third or fourth and probably won’t arrive home until the seventh or eighth or maybe the ninth.

I am anxious to get back home again and see you all and am glad to hear that Alfred is going back to school.

Packard and Mack

A Packard and Mack (short for Mackenzie, named after the river in Alaska.)

The next line, about the 1934 Packard, makes me wonder if the Packard that Lad drove was a 1934. This picture might have been a ’37 or ’39 Packard. I know the family had at least those three. Here’s a picture of one of the Packards. Can you tell? If you have any information, please leave a comment.

On the trip from Madison to Chicago I rode in a 1934 Packard, what do you think of that? I have lots of things to tell you when I get back and hope I can remember them all. There are so many that I’m afraid many of them have gotten lost back in my mind but I guess they’ll come out in the wash. It will certainly be nice to get home and until next week, goodbye.

Lots of love to you and the kids.

Ced

Tomorrow, another letter as Ced moves closer and closer to Trumbull and the old homestead.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (28) – A Letter From Aunt Mary Peabody – August 21, 1934

The following letter was originally sent to St. Paul but was forwarded to Star Prairie and I believe Ced received it before he left for Ohio and the Air Races. 

CDG - Coming of Age Adventure - Pettigrew Museum envelope - Aug., 1934.jpeg

CDG - Perrtigrew Museum (1) - Aug., 1934

CDG - Coming of Age Adventure - Pettigrew Museum (2) - Aug., 1934

August 21, 1934

Dear Cedric:

Aunt Marian, cousins Ruth, Nora, Edith and I were glad to have your card and were sorry we could not go to see you in St. Paul. This is a busy place – 800 visitors shown through the building already this month, which keeps us busy indeed. Ruth is here for a short visit, leaving tomorrow for Morgantown, West Virginia. Edith is staying here and attending Business college. She hopes to get some kind of work in September; is now devoting her time to shorthand and typing. It is good that one of you at least has had a glimpse of your Western home. It seems too bad when families scatter and lose track of each other. All of great grandfather Peabody’s nieces and nephews were as old or older than my mother’s. That makes cousins on that side much older than me. No one knew more than two first cousins on that side and five cousins once removed. There are probably more than 100 people nearby related to us who are utter strangers to us. Don’t let your generation do that – the world is so very much smaller than it was 70 years ago, and it is so much easier to go from one place to another than it was some 35 years ago. Please give my love to your family when you see them again. I was happy to have a glimpse of some of you last fall. Aunt Marian and all her cousins send greetings.

Affectionately,

Aunt Mary

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (27) – Grandpa’s Lost Letter – August, 1934

This letter was written by Grandpa on July 30, 1934 and mailed to Ced to reach him while he was visiting the Chicago World’s Fair and staying at the Chicago YMCA. Ced left Chicago Monday morning, July 30th, and the letter arrived on Wednesday, Aug. 1, 1934. The YMCA held the letter for 14 days.  They marked it “Unclaimed” on Aug. 14 and mailed it back to Grandpa. Grandpa wrote a note on the envelope  before sending it to Ced at Star Prairie, Wisc.

CDG - Lost letter, July 30, 1934

 

CDG - Lost letter (Note) - July 30, 1934

Grandpa’s note reads:

Thurs, 8/16/1934

This was just returned to me this morning.

Brief News Summary

Uncle Fred (Stanley) stayed overnight. He brought Lyman with him.

Arnold (Gibson, Lad’s best friend)  is O.K. He had some infected sore in his leg which the doctor took care of.

He went to school yesterday.

The girls can now say they have been to Yale. I had to go to New Haven yesterday on business,

so I took them with me. They had only time to walk around a bit and go through two of the buildings.

=======================

Next time you write include a list of those you would like to have invited to a “Welcome Home”

party. I am rather puzzled as to how many and who to invite and hesitant to leave it to the girls’

judgement.

How is the raincoat standing up? Did you loose your knife with the address book?  Based on your experiences, what additional equipment would you take on a trip of this sort next time?

DAD

****************************************************
This is the letter:

Trumbull, July 30

Dear Ced,

Monday night, dishes are washed and Elizabeth (Bissie, Grandpa’s only daughter) and Peg (Peg Beebe, her friend) are out in Irwin’s (Laufer) truck and Dick is just putting the finishing touches on his packing. He leaves for camp at 8:30 tomorrow.

But to go back. A week ago yesterday Aunt Helen ((Peabody) Human) and Dorothy (Peabody) came up and told of your visit at New York and Ossining. Dan and Lad came home (from their work at the CCC Camps). Lad of course spent most of his time on the motorcycle. During the week Arnold (Gibson) took off the generator which I left with Mr. Page and I also had the battery rebuild by Carr. Cost $3.75. Lad came home Friday PM, having first stopped at Page’s and retrieved the generator. We had a rush job Saturday at the office, so the whole gang, including Lad, went down and finished up a 5000 mimeograph job, run both sides – 10,000 impressions. We then got Lad’s battery. Saturday afternoon Rusty (Huerlin) came up to get me to help him on an idea for a Lucky Strike advertising series. Dan did not come home at all this weekend and I have not heard from him. Sunday was uneventful.

Tonight I stopped at the store (Kurtz’s Store, which houses the Trumbull Post Office) and got your letter from Chicago – which brings us up to date. Incidentally, here is a cartoon from today’s telegram which amused Dick. It might also be interesting to show to some of those, like the man in the Auburn who related his story about his hitchhiker experience, who seemed a bit hesitant.

One day last week we had a severe rainstorm, with wind, which evidently dislodged a Chimney Swift nest in the dining room chimney. When we got up in the morning we heard a very queer noise and found two baby Swift’s who had fallen down the chimney into the dining room. In spite of Dick’s and Elizabeth’s efforts at feeding them, they expired within a day of one another and were buried under the Lilac Bush near the back door.

Blog - Lilac Bush

Lilacs

We have been pretty busy at the office this week. George had the automatic going today, imprinting 10,000 letterheads for Mercer.

David is still at camp. After supper one day last week (ink has run out of pen) we all took a trip up to the Hemlock’s (on same road as Huntington’s junk place) and paid him a visit. While he did not admit it, he seemed happy and cheerful enough, is eating better and looks well. He may come home next week. Here is a card I received from him. The little boy blue he refers to is a wooden door stop which he made up there under their direction.

That’s all the home news I can think of right now. It is certainly good to know you are so nicely fixed at the YMCA. Inside rooms are often quieter and better to sleep in than outside. I’m also glad you had a chance to visit with the Draz’s and renew old family contacts. Will be much interested to hear all about them in detail when you get back.

One man told me of a stunt some boys did in getting to the Pacific coast by your method. They would go to some leading hotel, clean-shaven, neatly dressed, shoes shined, hair brushed, etc. and ask the clerk if they might look over the register for names of people from their hometown who were checking out that day. When any were located, they would waylay them at the desk as they were leaving and briefly explain just what they were doing, where they were going, etc. and if it would be convenient if they had room in their car etc. Very often, in the case of traveling men, they were glad for the company and they liked it better than picking some unknown up on the road. The conversation I suppose would run something like this: “Pardon me, but aren’t you Mr. Smith from Bridgeport? I saw in the hotel register your name listed as from my own hometown and I wondered if you happen to be going in the direction of St. Paul, and could conveniently let me bum a ride. I came out here to see some relatives by hitchhike method and stopped to see the fair.”

I just noticed that your letter mailed Thursday at 7:30 PM from Chicago did not reach me until Monday PM. Even assuming it arrived last mail Saturday, if you stay only the four days, you are leaving today and this note, which can’t be mailed until Tuesday a.m., Wednesday noon is probably the earliest it will reach the YMCA and I’m wondering if you’ll be there.

You haven’t said anything in any of your letters as to how the finances are holding out. Have you tried to cash in any Travelers checks yet?

I’m awfully glad you are making this trip. It’s something you will always look back on with pleasure. While I hadn’t any fear whatsoever about your being able to take care of yourself, it will broaden your knowledge of human nature, affording additional opportunities of practicing self-reliance and add another interesting chapter to your journey through life. The kind of thing I wish I had done when I was your age. Just the same, I miss you, old standby, and I’ll be really glad to see you march up the driveway soon.

Love

Dad

Tomorrow, another letter written during Ced’s Amazing Adventure.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (26) – Ced’s Travel Journal – Chicago to Star Prairie, Wisconsin – August, 1934

Ced has been writing a diary of his trip and he sends sections of it home to Grandpa for safe keeping. The following are pages 10 – 14.

Ced - 1938

Cedric Duryee Guion 

Thursday

(August 2, 1934)

Dear Dad,

I am staying with Uncle Kenneth, Aunt Nora, and their three children; Allan, Joyce and seven weeks old Muriel, at Star Prairie, Wisconsin. I arrived in New Richmond Tuesday night and Uncle Douglas met me there.

I believe I left off on the “letter diary” at my arrival in Cleveland, therefore I will begin there. The first day at the Fair I started at the 12th St. Gate and then went through the park parallel with the islands, very thoroughly during the day, and also through the island. I looked at everything and went inside everything that looked interesting. There were many interesting things but nothing outstanding.

The second day I went into Old England where I met a friend of the Draz’s which they had told me about there. That evening I saw the Chrysler track where Barry Oldfield and his “hell drivers” put on a demonstration with Plymouths. They took two Plymouths and ran them through some sandpits where they certainly did some wonderful tricks. I saw the Ford building that afternoon and in it were some wonderful old carriages and autos, some of the most interesting I put on the inside cover of the diary from the railway booklet which I sent you with the other junk.

CDG - Of interest in the Fird Exhibit

Of  Interest at the Ford and Chrysler exhibits

I took another big section that day and the next day finished up with the trip through the Fairgrounds. I saw the Drama of Transportation which was quite a lot like the Fair of the Iron Horse, which we saw in Baltimore. I was supposed to start Monday morning of this week but I dropped Alfred’s watch on the tile floor in the shower and broke the balance wheel staff, and had to wait to have this fixed. I got started about noon and walked almost out of Chicago before getting a ride. This man carried me about 2 miles and then I walked a mile or so and was carried another 2 miles. I walked about half a mile and was carried about a mile, than I walked another half-mile and rode a mile and then got a ride for two blocks, then I got a 5 mile ride and walked about a mile on a wrong road, but I got a ride to the right one very quickly. Next, I walked 2 miles rode two, walked one, rode two, walked one, rode one, walked one and got a ride in a Ford V-8 truck for almost 100 miles, about that time it got dark and I walked along a little traveled road for about 5 miles when a model T picked me up and took me into Madison, Wisconsin, where I was going to look up Rudolph, but at a drugstore they told me that he was not in the same house and they called Harold’s home and found that Rudolf was in Chicago studying for a higher position   and Harold was in  Wabeno, Wisconsin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabeno,_Wisconsin) for his hay fever but a cousin of theirs was at Harold’s place, and they invited me out for the night. Fred Shaken (the cousin) was there with two classmates and they are all going to the University of Wisconsin. I left early the next morning with Star Prairie as my goal. I walked about 2 miles and discovered I had left my bathing suit but decided not to go back as the house would probably be locked anyway and then the first crack off the bat a 1934 Chevrolet came along and picked me up, the driver decided not to be  the driver and so I took his place. We stopped and he got a glass of beer and gave me a bottle of root beer, then we arrived at the Dells, Wisconsin (a state scenic place in case you don’t know),  (https://dnr.wisconsin.gov/topic/parks/mirrorlake/recreation/camping    he had me drive in and he showed me all one could see from a car and then we went on to his destination. Then I walked about a quarter of a mile and was picked up and carried about 6 miles. I walked another mile and a 1934 Studebaker picked me up. I walked through a small town and was carried about a quarter of a mile and then walked another quarter of a mile when a Packard picked me up and carried me about 3 miles. That I walked about 2 miles and a Ford picked me up. I was going all the way but suddenly the fan pulley broke off, the generator stopped working and the broken piece broke one of the fan blades and caused a big hole in the radiator  (the motor had only been driven 1200 miles since repairs and there was no cooling system) so we limped into a garage with a very hot motor and I went on alone again.

I got a ride in another 1934 Buick and for the first time in my life, much to my sorrow and discomfort, we came upon a very horrible accident, a boy on a bike had been struck and apparently very badly hurt. The one hitting him had apparently evacuated and left the boy to die. The new Buick I was in went on to the next town for a doctor and we did 85 and 90 all the way  (about 4 miles).

Next Saturday I will finish this long letter to Grandpa telling of Ced’s walk/ride from Chicago to Star Prairie, Wisconsin.

Tomorrow I will begin posting letters written in 1942. Dan is in the Army at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia, for his Basic Training. Lad is classified 1-A and expects to be called up any day. The rest of the family attempt to live a normal life but things have changed.

Judy Guion