Friends – Rusty Heurlin Writes to Ced – An Arctic Bum – March 25, 1944

This letter is written to Ced from Rusty Huerlin, probably received after he had returned to his job in Anchorage after his lengthy stay in Trumbull and his quick visit with Lad and Marian.

Rusty Heurlin

Nome, Alaska

3—25—44

Dear Ced,

Word by mukluk telegraph informs me that you are back in Anchorage. Fine guy you turned out to be not to write to your dear old pal. But perhaps you’ll get the pin out of your tail now and drop us a line to let me know how Al (Grandpa) is doing and how you enjoyed your trip outside.

Since arriving here have been tied up with ATG (Alaska Territorial Guard Association, Inc.) work but going to start painting in a couple of days. The Major (Major Marvin “Muktuk” Marston, https://alaskahistoricalsociety.org/muktuk-marstons-five-point-plan/ and I have located a cabin for ourselves. Real cold weather here and have never seen as much snow. Twill be a late break up this year in case you would like to know. I should say between the fourth and the eighth.

On visit down from Palmer I emptied your pent-up mailbox and left mail with Bob Hall. Hope I did the right thing and that he contacted you or left it where you could get it before he went outside.

If Ted Kogan got luggage left in my wake, kindly get it back from him. Hold everything for me if you are not going into service. May write for frames in a couple of weeks. Keep stretchers and jib sail bag together. If you have no room for them, best place may be at George’s. Expect to be in Nome until break up time when I will go north with years supply of grub. But if you should happen to know of anyone traveling to Nome by CAA it would be all mighty swell, if no trouble to that person, to load on my frames, bag and stretchers. If Dale or Dell, the fellow who brought us out, is making the trip this way soon, I am sure he would be glad to do me this favor. You might be driving by his place sometime and can drop in to see him on this. Had I come the way planned for me, I could have handled everything.

Sorry I did not get to see you before I left. Confidentially, as I do not want it to get about, I pulled a fast one on Governor Gruening. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Gruening It resulted in him commandeering an army car and paying me a visit at Palmer. But it wasn’t exactly a fast one and it took me one month of careful planning. It is too long a story to go over at this early hour of the morning. I only want you to know that it was honest. Or should I not say to a trusted and tried friend that he, the Governor, fell for my rubber salmon egg. Two days later he was in Fairbanks, then came a telephone call from Fairbanks for me to proceed to Nome on next Army transport. At Fort Rich a week later I got my traveling orders but no planes to Nome were available. To wait longer for transportation was like waiting for the invasion. I finally decided to put tongue in cheek and go by Star. That was why I had to cut down on baggage. But trip here is not known to Star officials so I am now one jump and the hop ahead of them.

Water is $.10 a gallon here. Whiskey cannot be had. When you see George again tell him I really like my scotch cut with water. I think he will understand. Ha ha!

Contact Ted Kogan through weather Bureau or Juanita at OPA. Drop out of an evening and see their nice home which they bought. Also see Maurie and Helen. Best to you and Hans and Ruth and all good Scandahoovis. Sorry I cannot or it’s sad I cannot add the name of dear old Kjosen,

Thank Ted for his trouble and will write him soon. Let’s hear from you soon Sonny boy… Till we meet again,

Yours to be an Arctic bum —– Rusty

During stop-over at Nulato I pissed in the Yukon. Did it the hard way too— if you know what I mean? Aim to do the rest the hard way to— if I can— and I have shot and killed a bear.

I believe the following is Ced’s memory of this trip, although he may have incorrectly remembered the approximate dates. I don’t know if we’ll ever know the complete story. This is taken from the childhood memories I recorded with my Uncle Ced on one of two occasions.

About 1940-41, things were getting red-hot. Major Marston was up there in charge of the Alaskan defense command. He was based in Anchorage. Rusty made friends with him – he made friends with everyone he talked to. He met the Governor of Alaska through Major Marston. Rusty came home one night and he said, “Know what they’re going to do? Major Marston says that the Governor wants to go around the whole perimeter of Alaska and try to develop a reasonable defense system for Alaska. I guess it was Major Marston’s idea. Major Marston said, ’None of us know anything about Alaska, the Eskimos, the Indians. We should go around and meet these native people. They know the land and if any problems develop with the days coming, we’d be lost. We wouldn’t know what to do.’ He said, ‘We want to get an Alaskan defense going with native people.’ Governor Gruening says, ’Well you know what? I don’t know any. I’m the Governor of this territory and I’d like to go around with you and meet these people that I’m supposed to be Governor of.’ “ So, Rusty sat and listened to all this talk and he said, ”You wouldn’t want to take me along, would you? I’ve had this in the back of my mind for years, that I would like to do a series of pictures on the discovery of Alaska.” His whole goal, idea and the love of his life was Alaska. He said, ”I’d like to have a chance to go around to all those places, and make sketches.” “OK, come on along.” they said. That’s where he got this series of 18 pictures, starting with the fellow who came from Russia, sailed to Alaska and took it for the Russians. That was the first painting, he did the Gold Rush and 16 others. This was after he moved to Fairbanks.” (Rusty Heurlin’s large panels depicting the history of Alaska are visible at Pioneer Park in Anchorage. http://fairbanks-alaska.com/pioneer-museum-big-stampede.htm

Tomorrow and Sunday, more Special Pictures and Memories of our Family Island Retreat know as “Liquid Heaven”.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Ex-Trumbullites (and Marian) (1) – Ced’s Travel Plans – February 20, 1944

Trumbull, Conn. February 20, 1944

Dear Ex-Trumbullites (and Marian)

Judy_0003Cedric Duryee Guion

You may perhaps recall, gentle readers, that at the close of last week’s chapter we had left our hero, Ced, out on a limb. Upon his return from New York he reported the best reservation he was able to obtain for his return journey was February 22, and quite ironically this Washington’s Birthday reservation was on the Jeffersonian, the crack Pennsylvania train to St. Louis, whence he expected to proceed to Texarkana for a stopover long enough to visit the. A.P.‘s. (A.P.’s  – Alfred Peabody Guion (Lad) and his wife, Marian (Irwin) Guion)  A few days later however, having received another wire from Art Woodley advising him to start immediately, he again visited New York Friday to try for an earlier reservation only to find the Jeffersonian date could not be better but he could take his chance without reservation on one of the other regular trains. This he decided to do so yesterday (Saturday) he held a hasty and quite informal Farewell Sourdough Flapjack Party attended by we inmates, Alta Gibson, (Arnold had already left for work) Flora Bushey, Mrs. Ives and Ethel. The one o’clock express from Bridgeport to Penn Station was very late and thus the first section gathered up those on hand for both sections which not only crowded the Bridgeport station but filled the entire length of the long platform. When the train finally pulled in it was already so crowded that people were packed standing in the aisles and also on the platform, so that we were hardly able to crowd up the steps of the train. We did manage to squeeze in but whether the rest of the waiting crowd were able to wedge themselves in I don’t know. Arriving at the station which was also packed with the usual wartime weekend crowd, Ced finally managed to get his baggage checked. We then went over to the Grand Central to say goodbye to Elsie, ate an early supper and got back to Penn Station just before Jeffersonian train time. Still no last minute cancellations on any of the St. Louis trains, but on the basis of “nothing ventured, nothing won”, Ced asked me to go through the gate with his 22nd reservation while he picked up his bags and made a last try. I waited at the foot of the stairs and finally won from the reluctant brakeman the admission that Ced might board the train on the slim chance that someone who had not canceled might still fail to show up, but that if this did not happen, he would have to get off in Philadelphia and wait for some other train. The minutes clicked by, the conductor stood with watch in hand, yelled, “All aboard.” when Ced appeared at the top of the steps, rushed down with his bag in one hand and a ticket in the other and announced, “I got it”. We said a hasty goodbye and the train pulled out leaving me with the comforting feeling that he would have a comfortable ride at least as far as St. Louis where he was due at 1:35 this afternoon. From there he goes by way of the Missouri Pacific to Texarkana. There is a train which leaves shortly after the Jeffersonian arrives, which would land him at Texarkana at 2:20 AM Monday morning. The next train to my mind is better, leaving St. Louis at 5:50 PM and arriving at Texarkana at 6:05 AM.. Possibly permitting him to have Monday breakfast with Lad and Marian. I am waiting to hear just what did happen.

From there Ced continues on to Los Angeles, thence to Seattle and from there by boat to Alaska. For your information, Ced, Aunt Betty says she mailed your Seattle letter and Elsie’s card in the mailbox in the medical building at about two o’clock, a collection from which was scheduled to be made at three. Of course everyone felt they would like to have Ced stay longer, but we did have him for such a long visit that we were more reconciled to his leaving as contrasted with Lad’s flying visit in the early fall.

David Peabody Guion

Nary a word has been received this week from Dave outside of a letter received last Monday, written the Saturday previously and expressing doubt as to his future movements. I assume he has been sent to some other camp for basic training and has been so busy he hasn’t had time to write. I hope tomorrow’s mail will bring some definite word.

Tomorrow, page 2 of this letter filled with bits and pieces of news about the rest of the family and some friends.

Judy Guion.

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (32) – P. S. – October 8, 1934 and March 18, 1935

These two notes provide a post script to Ced’s Amazing Adventure.

PEABODY - Helen Gillespie s note to Ced - 1934

Dear Cedric,

You don’t know how disappointed we were at not seeing you when you were in this part of the country this summer. I received your card and had planned on going down to Uncle Frank’s to see you when, according to our local physician’s diagnosis, Dale was overcome by the heat and the doctor refused to give his consent to Dale’s leaving. When we did get away you had left for the farm again and we couldn’t take time to go up there. We were terribly sorry not to have seen you and hope you, and the others of the family, will come this way again soon. (Dale’s trouble turned out to be atropine poisoning so wasn’t as serious as it might have been.)

Love,

Helen (Gillespie)

October eight

This note was mailed in Little Falls, Minnesota. I’m not sure how Helen Gillespie is related to Franklin Peabody and when I get some extra time I will try to figure that out. She may have been his younger sister, Helen Sophia, but I need to do some more digging to confirm that.

**************************************************************

Peabody - Putnam Burton Peabodys note to Ced re photo - 1935

PEABODY - Kemper Foster Peabody, - 1886

2011 Park Ave., Topeka, Kansas, March 18/35

Dear Cedric:-

I am gathering up, and sending out to my various kindred, a number of trinkets that might interest them. My years must be growing steadily shorter, – and I wish to place my treasures with those that will appreciate and value them.

To YOU, therefore, I am sending an unusually good photo – portrait of your grandfather (Kemper Foster Peabody, Arla Peabody’s father), taken when he was young. It looks exactly as HE did, those days.

I have never been more busy, in all the 79 years of my life, than I am, just now. Several hours at the typewriter, daily, and I am compelled to make EVERYTHING BRIEF.

But I send love to you all: with my very best wishes,

Faithfully yours,

PB Peabody

(Putnam Burton Peabody, oldest brother of Kemper Foster Peabody, Arla Peabody Guion’s Father.)

And so we come to the end of Ced’s Coming of Age Adventure in September, 1934. Ced’s next adventure begins in 1940 when he and his older brother Dan, back from Venezuela for a year, leave Trumbull to travel to Anchorage, Alaska, where they hope to find jobs. 

Tomorrow, I will begin posting letters written in 1942. Dan is already in the Army and Lad is expecting to be inducted in the next few months.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (30) – A Letter From Grandma Peabody – September 13, 1934

Grandma Peabody

Grandma Peabody

September 13

Dear Cedric,

Your welcome letter came several days ago. I am so glad you are home again because I could not help worrying about you.

I would certainly like to see you and hear of your visits and all about the relatives you visited. You must have had a great time

Did you like haying and threshing? I know all about such things. You should have seen us (the Westlin’s) carrying lunches out to the men haying, and to the threshing crews when that work started usually late in September, sometimes as late as October. The wind would blow and it was cold. The men were always so glad for the hot coffee, sandwiches and cake.

I believe I told your father I am moving to New York City in a short time to live with Aunt Dorothy. I am wondering if it will be easier for you to come to New York to make a visit rather than Ossining. We are all anxious to hear any news.

No news from here, everything seems to go jogging along as usual.

Lovingly,

Grandma

My love to all of you.

Tomorrow, I will begin a week of letters written in 1940, when Lad is the only son away from home.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (29) – Ced’s Plans for Coming Home – September 1, 1934

Ced is on his way home, with a few stops on the way. This will be a much quicker trip, First, because Ced has seen almost everyone he wanted to see or meet, and second, because he is anxious to get home and see the family.

Cedric Duryee Guion

Chagrin Falls, Ohio

Sat. Sept. 1

Dear Dad:

I saw Vivian and Aunt Anna before I left Star Prairie and they gave me five dollars to “have a good time on”. I got good rides all the way down to Madison Monday and Tuesday headed for Chicago and found cousin Rudolf there where he is staying. I spent Wednesday at Chicago with him and we went to the fair Wednesday night and saw The Black Forest and the “Standard Oil Line Power Show” and then went to the Ford building and saw their movie which was excellent and then we heard the Ford Symphony band.

I started for Cleveland Thursday morning expecting to get there by night but I didn’t get a ride until four o’clock in the afternoon. I had a terrible day of it and first went to bed on the road at 3 AM. I made Cleveland at three o’clock yesterday and here I am at Chagrin Falls. We are going to the air races tomorrow and I will leave for home on the third or fourth and probably won’t arrive home until the seventh or eighth or maybe the ninth.

I am anxious to get back home again and see you all and am glad to hear that Alfred is going back to school.

Packard and Mack

A Packard and Mack (short for Mackenzie, named after the river in Alaska.)

The next line, about the 1934 Packard, makes me wonder if the Packard that Lad drove was a 1934. This picture might have been a ’37 or ’39 Packard. I know the family had at least those three. Here’s a picture of one of the Packards. Can you tell? If you have any information, please leave a comment.

On the trip from Madison to Chicago I rode in a 1934 Packard, what do you think of that? I have lots of things to tell you when I get back and hope I can remember them all. There are so many that I’m afraid many of them have gotten lost back in my mind but I guess they’ll come out in the wash. It will certainly be nice to get home and until next week, goodbye.

Lots of love to you and the kids.

Ced

Tomorrow, another letter as Ced moves closer and closer to Trumbull and the old homestead.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (28) – A Letter From Aunt Mary Peabody – August 21, 1934

The following letter was originally sent to St. Paul but was forwarded to Star Prairie and I believe Ced received it before he left for Ohio and the Air Races. 

CDG - Coming of Age Adventure - Pettigrew Museum envelope - Aug., 1934.jpeg

CDG - Perrtigrew Museum (1) - Aug., 1934

CDG - Coming of Age Adventure - Pettigrew Museum (2) - Aug., 1934

August 21, 1934

Dear Cedric:

Aunt Marian, cousins Ruth, Nora, Edith and I were glad to have your card and were sorry we could not go to see you in St. Paul. This is a busy place – 800 visitors shown through the building already this month, which keeps us busy indeed. Ruth is here for a short visit, leaving tomorrow for Morgantown, West Virginia. Edith is staying here and attending Business college. She hopes to get some kind of work in September; is now devoting her time to shorthand and typing. It is good that one of you at least has had a glimpse of your Western home. It seems too bad when families scatter and lose track of each other. All of great grandfather Peabody’s nieces and nephews were as old or older than my mother’s. That makes cousins on that side much older than me. No one knew more than two first cousins on that side and five cousins once removed. There are probably more than 100 people nearby related to us who are utter strangers to us. Don’t let your generation do that – the world is so very much smaller than it was 70 years ago, and it is so much easier to go from one place to another than it was some 35 years ago. Please give my love to your family when you see them again. I was happy to have a glimpse of some of you last fall. Aunt Marian and all her cousins send greetings.

Affectionately,

Aunt Mary

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (27) – Grandpa’s Lost Letter – August, 1934

This letter was written by Grandpa on July 30, 1934 and mailed to Ced to reach him while he was visiting the Chicago World’s Fair and staying at the Chicago YMCA. Ced left Chicago Monday morning, July 30th, and the letter arrived on Wednesday, Aug. 1, 1934. The YMCA held the letter for 14 days.  They marked it “Unclaimed” on Aug. 14 and mailed it back to Grandpa. Grandpa wrote a note on the envelope  before sending it to Ced at Star Prairie, Wisc.

CDG - Lost letter, July 30, 1934

 

CDG - Lost letter (Note) - July 30, 1934

Grandpa’s note reads:

Thurs, 8/16/1934

This was just returned to me this morning.

Brief News Summary

Uncle Fred (Stanley) stayed overnight. He brought Lyman with him.

Arnold (Gibson, Lad’s best friend)  is O.K. He had some infected sore in his leg which the doctor took care of.

He went to school yesterday.

The girls can now say they have been to Yale. I had to go to New Haven yesterday on business,

so I took them with me. They had only time to walk around a bit and go through two of the buildings.

=======================

Next time you write include a list of those you would like to have invited to a “Welcome Home”

party. I am rather puzzled as to how many and who to invite and hesitant to leave it to the girls’

judgement.

How is the raincoat standing up? Did you loose your knife with the address book?  Based on your experiences, what additional equipment would you take on a trip of this sort next time?

DAD

****************************************************
This is the letter:

Trumbull, July 30

Dear Ced,

Monday night, dishes are washed and Elizabeth (Bissie, Grandpa’s only daughter) and Peg (Peg Beebe, her friend) are out in Irwin’s (Laufer) truck and Dick is just putting the finishing touches on his packing. He leaves for camp at 8:30 tomorrow.

But to go back. A week ago yesterday Aunt Helen ((Peabody) Human) and Dorothy (Peabody) came up and told of your visit at New York and Ossining. Dan and Lad came home (from their work at the CCC Camps). Lad of course spent most of his time on the motorcycle. During the week Arnold (Gibson) took off the generator which I left with Mr. Page and I also had the battery rebuild by Carr. Cost $3.75. Lad came home Friday PM, having first stopped at Page’s and retrieved the generator. We had a rush job Saturday at the office, so the whole gang, including Lad, went down and finished up a 5000 mimeograph job, run both sides – 10,000 impressions. We then got Lad’s battery. Saturday afternoon Rusty (Huerlin) came up to get me to help him on an idea for a Lucky Strike advertising series. Dan did not come home at all this weekend and I have not heard from him. Sunday was uneventful.

Tonight I stopped at the store (Kurtz’s Store, which houses the Trumbull Post Office) and got your letter from Chicago – which brings us up to date. Incidentally, here is a cartoon from today’s telegram which amused Dick. It might also be interesting to show to some of those, like the man in the Auburn who related his story about his hitchhiker experience, who seemed a bit hesitant.

One day last week we had a severe rainstorm, with wind, which evidently dislodged a Chimney Swift nest in the dining room chimney. When we got up in the morning we heard a very queer noise and found two baby Swift’s who had fallen down the chimney into the dining room. In spite of Dick’s and Elizabeth’s efforts at feeding them, they expired within a day of one another and were buried under the Lilac Bush near the back door.

Blog - Lilac Bush

Lilacs

We have been pretty busy at the office this week. George had the automatic going today, imprinting 10,000 letterheads for Mercer.

David is still at camp. After supper one day last week (ink has run out of pen) we all took a trip up to the Hemlock’s (on same road as Huntington’s junk place) and paid him a visit. While he did not admit it, he seemed happy and cheerful enough, is eating better and looks well. He may come home next week. Here is a card I received from him. The little boy blue he refers to is a wooden door stop which he made up there under their direction.

That’s all the home news I can think of right now. It is certainly good to know you are so nicely fixed at the YMCA. Inside rooms are often quieter and better to sleep in than outside. I’m also glad you had a chance to visit with the Draz’s and renew old family contacts. Will be much interested to hear all about them in detail when you get back.

One man told me of a stunt some boys did in getting to the Pacific coast by your method. They would go to some leading hotel, clean-shaven, neatly dressed, shoes shined, hair brushed, etc. and ask the clerk if they might look over the register for names of people from their hometown who were checking out that day. When any were located, they would waylay them at the desk as they were leaving and briefly explain just what they were doing, where they were going, etc. and if it would be convenient if they had room in their car etc. Very often, in the case of traveling men, they were glad for the company and they liked it better than picking some unknown up on the road. The conversation I suppose would run something like this: “Pardon me, but aren’t you Mr. Smith from Bridgeport? I saw in the hotel register your name listed as from my own hometown and I wondered if you happen to be going in the direction of St. Paul, and could conveniently let me bum a ride. I came out here to see some relatives by hitchhike method and stopped to see the fair.”

I just noticed that your letter mailed Thursday at 7:30 PM from Chicago did not reach me until Monday PM. Even assuming it arrived last mail Saturday, if you stay only the four days, you are leaving today and this note, which can’t be mailed until Tuesday a.m., Wednesday noon is probably the earliest it will reach the YMCA and I’m wondering if you’ll be there.

You haven’t said anything in any of your letters as to how the finances are holding out. Have you tried to cash in any Travelers checks yet?

I’m awfully glad you are making this trip. It’s something you will always look back on with pleasure. While I hadn’t any fear whatsoever about your being able to take care of yourself, it will broaden your knowledge of human nature, affording additional opportunities of practicing self-reliance and add another interesting chapter to your journey through life. The kind of thing I wish I had done when I was your age. Just the same, I miss you, old standby, and I’ll be really glad to see you march up the driveway soon.

Love

Dad

Tomorrow, another letter written during Ced’s Amazing Adventure.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (26) – Ced’s Travel Journal – Chicago to Star Prairie, Wisconsin – August, 1934

Ced has been writing a diary of his trip and he sends sections of it home to Grandpa for safe keeping. The following are pages 10 – 14.

Ced - 1938

Cedric Duryee Guion 

Thursday

(August 2, 1934)

Dear Dad,

I am staying with Uncle Kenneth, Aunt Nora, and their three children; Allan, Joyce and seven weeks old Muriel, at Star Prairie, Wisconsin. I arrived in New Richmond Tuesday night and Uncle Douglas met me there.

I believe I left off on the “letter diary” at my arrival in Cleveland, therefore I will begin there. The first day at the Fair I started at the 12th St. Gate and then went through the park parallel with the islands, very thoroughly during the day, and also through the island. I looked at everything and went inside everything that looked interesting. There were many interesting things but nothing outstanding.

The second day I went into Old England where I met a friend of the Draz’s which they had told me about there. That evening I saw the Chrysler track where Barry Oldfield and his “hell drivers” put on a demonstration with Plymouths. They took two Plymouths and ran them through some sandpits where they certainly did some wonderful tricks. I saw the Ford building that afternoon and in it were some wonderful old carriages and autos, some of the most interesting I put on the inside cover of the diary from the railway booklet which I sent you with the other junk.

CDG - Of interest in the Fird Exhibit

Of  Interest at the Ford and Chrysler exhibits

I took another big section that day and the next day finished up with the trip through the Fairgrounds. I saw the Drama of Transportation which was quite a lot like the Fair of the Iron Horse, which we saw in Baltimore. I was supposed to start Monday morning of this week but I dropped Alfred’s watch on the tile floor in the shower and broke the balance wheel staff, and had to wait to have this fixed. I got started about noon and walked almost out of Chicago before getting a ride. This man carried me about 2 miles and then I walked a mile or so and was carried another 2 miles. I walked about half a mile and was carried about a mile, than I walked another half-mile and rode a mile and then got a ride for two blocks, then I got a 5 mile ride and walked about a mile on a wrong road, but I got a ride to the right one very quickly. Next, I walked 2 miles rode two, walked one, rode two, walked one, rode one, walked one and got a ride in a Ford V-8 truck for almost 100 miles, about that time it got dark and I walked along a little traveled road for about 5 miles when a model T picked me up and took me into Madison, Wisconsin, where I was going to look up Rudolph, but at a drugstore they told me that he was not in the same house and they called Harold’s home and found that Rudolf was in Chicago studying for a higher position   and Harold was in  Wabeno, Wisconsin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabeno,_Wisconsin) for his hay fever but a cousin of theirs was at Harold’s place, and they invited me out for the night. Fred Shaken (the cousin) was there with two classmates and they are all going to the University of Wisconsin. I left early the next morning with Star Prairie as my goal. I walked about 2 miles and discovered I had left my bathing suit but decided not to go back as the house would probably be locked anyway and then the first crack off the bat a 1934 Chevrolet came along and picked me up, the driver decided not to be  the driver and so I took his place. We stopped and he got a glass of beer and gave me a bottle of root beer, then we arrived at the Dells, Wisconsin (a state scenic place in case you don’t know),  (https://dnr.wisconsin.gov/topic/parks/mirrorlake/recreation/camping    he had me drive in and he showed me all one could see from a car and then we went on to his destination. Then I walked about a quarter of a mile and was picked up and carried about 6 miles. I walked another mile and a 1934 Studebaker picked me up. I walked through a small town and was carried about a quarter of a mile and then walked another quarter of a mile when a Packard picked me up and carried me about 3 miles. That I walked about 2 miles and a Ford picked me up. I was going all the way but suddenly the fan pulley broke off, the generator stopped working and the broken piece broke one of the fan blades and caused a big hole in the radiator  (the motor had only been driven 1200 miles since repairs and there was no cooling system) so we limped into a garage with a very hot motor and I went on alone again.

I got a ride in another 1934 Buick and for the first time in my life, much to my sorrow and discomfort, we came upon a very horrible accident, a boy on a bike had been struck and apparently very badly hurt. The one hitting him had apparently evacuated and left the boy to die. The new Buick I was in went on to the next town for a doctor and we did 85 and 90 all the way  (about 4 miles).

Next Saturday I will finish this long letter to Grandpa telling of Ced’s walk/ride from Chicago to Star Prairie, Wisconsin.

Tomorrow I will begin posting letters written in 1942. Dan is in the Army at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia, for his Basic Training. Lad is classified 1-A and expects to be called up any day. The rest of the family attempt to live a normal life but things have changed.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (25) – Letter From Grandma Peabody About a Bus Accident – August, 1934

Grandma Peabody

Grandma Peabody (Anna Charlotta Westlin Peabody)

(Grandma Arla’s mother)

August eight

Dear Cedric,

I was so relieved when I received your card telling of being at Uncle Kenneth and Aunt Nora’s. You did not state how long you expected to stay with them but I am taking a chance hoping this letter will find you still there on the farm.

It’s wonderful to know you are meeting so many of the relatives. I’m sure you will enjoy knowing them all. Don’t you think Uncle Kenneth and Aunt Nora very nice? I fell in love with her when I met her.

Last Sunday afternoon Burton (Peabody) and I went over to Trumbull, having received a letter from Elizabeth inviting us, also telling us Aunt Corinne was there on a visit. I don’t suppose you remember her very much, do you? It was nice to see the family again. Laddie and Daniel were home. Dickey was away at camp. They all seemed fine.

Monday afternoon I was very pleasantly surprised by (my daughters) Anne (Peabody Stanley) and Dorothy (Peabody), Arla’s sisters) arriving unannounced. They are both fine. Aunt Anne expects to leave for Vermont the latter part of this week. Uncle Larry (Peabody) and Aunt Marian are leaving today. If you could hitchhike to Vermont too, you would have some more happy times.

Things here in Ossining are running along the usual way again. That gruesome accident made quite a stir up. ( http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1934/07/23/page/1/article/14-are-killed-in-bus-crash-23-others-hurt)  (https://www.facebook.com/HistoricOssining/posts/559085660800614) It was horrible. Most of those injured were brought up St. Paul’s Place to the hospital which is some blocks away on the street above us. Also the dead were taken to the undertaker who lives on the other side of St. Paul’s Church. As only one person could be carried in the ambulance and trucks, it took a long time before all were cared for. There was such a clanging of bells, and noise from autos. Hundreds of autos passed our place. Burton (Peabody) was very busy getting all possible information and did not get home till after midnight. One young man lost his father, mother and a sister, 13 years old.

Today’s papers are telling again of the terrible heat wave in the middle west, and that we will get it. Thermometer shows 80° today. I would love to hear from you again. Please give my love to everyone and keep a lot for yourself.

Lovingly,

Grandma

Tomorrow, we hear from Ced who is in Star Prairie, Wisconsin. 

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (24) – A Quick Note From Ced in St. Paul, Minnesota – August, 1934

Ced continues with his Amazing Adventure meeting more family members and enjoying a variety of experiences.

Ced - 1938

Cedric Duryee Guion

cdg-letter-from-st-paul-1st-page-july-1934

cdg-letter-from-st-paul-page-2-july-1934

Here is the list of the Peabodys, in birth order. It might help as Ced mentions various members of the family that he meets.

  1. Putnam Burton, b. 28 July 1856, Alden, Wisc.
  2. Sarah Ester, b. 4 April 1858
  3. Helen Sophia, b. 17 Nov 1859
  4. Kemper, b. 2 Aug, 1861, Sheboygan, Wisc., m. Anna Charlotta Westlin (Grandma Peabody) (Father of Arla Mary Peabody, who married Alfred D Guion, Grandpa to me)
  5. Lloyd, b. 31 Aug 1863, Alden, Wisconsin
  6. Mary Brown, b. Sept, 1865
  7. Ellen Marion, b. 6 April 1867
  8. Eunice Diantha, b. 15 Nov. 1868
  9. Douglas, b. 12 Sept. 1871
  10. Francis Cornet, b. 3 July 1873
  11.  Norman Rex, b. 29 June 1877
  12.  Margaret Smith Osborne, b. 3 Sept. 1879; d. 7 April 1880
  13.  Kenneth Foster, b. 17 Nov. 1881

St. Paul
1736 Laurel Avenue

Dear Dad:
I am fine as usual and hope the same for you and the kidlet’s. Last Sunday Muriel was baptized (in Star Prairie, Wisconsin). Uncle Frank and Aunt Mary came up to get Barbara and brought Uncle Lloyd along. John Dale came with his family and Francis and Mercedes came over from Uncle Douglas’s. Uncle Burton presided and Barbara acted as sponsor. When the St. Paulites came back they brought Francis and me along. Monday night we went out to Robert’s house and saw his wife and little boy. Tuesday we went and had dinner with Uncle Lloyd, Aunt Mary (his wife) and Evelyn. Yesterday (Wednesday) we went down the Mississippi on a rear wheeler River steamboat to Hastings and down through a lock (The whole trip lasted seven hours.) As we came into St. Paul dock coming home, the piano player from the dance orchestra played a regular calliope on the pilothouse roof. It made a lovely trip, if I may call it that. Don’t know what we will do today but there is a boy next door to Uncle Frank’s with a 1927 Harley-Davidson and I have already made his acquaintance.
Lots of luck and love to all.
Ced

Tomorrow, I will begin posting letters written in February of 1940. On Monday, a letter from Rusty to Ced and for the rest of the week, two letters to Lad in Venezuela.

Judy Guion