Special Picture # 319 – Dan and Raymond Zabel, Jr., (Butch) – 1940


Tomorrow, another Special Picture.

On Monday, I’ll begin posting letters written in 1946. Both Lad and Dick are home in Trumbull with their wives, Ced remains working in Anchorage, Alaska, Dave is expecting to arrive home in a couple of months and Dan and Paulette await the arrival of their firstborn in France before returning to Trumbull.

Judy Guion


Special Picture # 318 – Dan in Venezuela with Some of His Surveying Crew – 1939


Tomorrow, I’ll begin a week of letters written in 1944. Lad and Marian are in Texas. Ced has been home but is traveling back to Anchorage, Alaska, hopefully with a stop in Texarkana to see Lad and Marian. Dan is quite busy in London, Dick is in Brazil and Dave seems happy with his new situation in Uncle Sam’s Army. Grandpa tries to keep the home fires burning.

Judy Guion 

Trumbull – Dear Ceddie, Dearie (1) – News From Family and Friends – September 13, 1942

It is now September, 1942. Dan has been in the Army since January and Lad went in at the beginning of May. Both are in training, Dan in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Lad in Aberdeen, Maryland. They were close enough to come home for the weekend whenever they could get a pass. For Grandpa’s birthday they were both able to get home and several of their friends were gathered at the Trumbull house. They all contributed to this letter to Ced, in Anchorage, Alaska.

Ced @ 1945

Trumbull, Conn., September 13, 1942

Dear Ceddy, Dearie,

We have been gaping at the photographs of those odd natives you sent us. We were particularly intrigued by an old, hairy, buck with a siwash mop-whiskers. The disheveled moss halo lends a certain amount of character to an otherwise stolid face. In one of the photos I was able to distinguish the nondescript physiognomy of “Fish-wheel Red”, that nefarious White Indian who used to perform orgies with panties pilfered from unwary clotheslines. Shabby Schaller is still infesting your locality, I see.

Since this is destined to assume the proportions of a round-robin letter, I shall limit myself to three or four pages, which will be concerned primarily with allowing others to have their say, effective immediately……………………………



Although this is the first word that you will hear from me, it is not the first attempt at writing you a letter. Some time ago I wrote to you and just the other day the letter came back to me saying that I had made mention of something of military value, so that the letter could not be forwarded to you in that condition. Well, naturally, I intend to make the necessary corrections and will, in due time, forward the original or a corrected copy. But as was so aptly stated by our literary friend and comrade in arms previously, this is to be a combination letter from various of those infesting Trumbull, and therefore I do not like to take up the necessary space here to write all that I would like. I notice that Dan has omitted the most important fact, that being that we all, with the exception of you, were able to make Trumbull for Dad’s birthday.

Ced – I am going to leave now so I have interrupted Alfred’s note to put in my two cents worth. My branch of the family is fine except for the usual bumps and bangs that kids usually get. Zeke is working 13 hours a night now and guess he will continue so for the duration. However, it gives us a nice income and at the rate we are going, we hope to have the house paid for by 1 March. Please write me a nice long letter and I promise I will answer it within a year. Both the kids are getting pretty big now and I will send you a picture of them when I get your letter.

—Biss & family

(continuation of the addition above) As usual, he paid off instead of accepting. However we did make a little token in his behalf. But I’ll let him take care of that end himself. And now since my time has reached the end of the allocated space, I shall nonchalantly set aside and let the next in line it take up the touch…


On Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, I’ll post the rest of this letter. On Friday, a letter from Dan’s girlfriend, Barbara to Ced.

Judy Guion


Trumbull – Dear DB, CD and DP – Short Notes and Local News – February 10, 1946

Trumbull, Conn., Feb. 10, 1946

Dear DB, CD and DP,

A cablegram from Dan, a New Year’s greeting from the Senechal’s (Paulette’s parents), a letter from Dave and a letter from your mother’s Aunt Marian (Rudolph Peabody’s mother) in Morgantown, W. Va., is what the mailman left in my lap — yes, even the cablegram arrived by mail, so you’re not as smart as you thought you were in catching me in a misstatement. I am also enclosing for your perusal copy of chapter 2 of Ced’s trek to the far North which I stated in my last letter I had left at the office but afterward remembered I had given it to Elizabeth to read and she had not returned to me. I did however, leave Dave’s letter at the office where I had taken it to make correction in my Addressograph stencils, as in this letter he stated his unit had been transferred to Tokyo, leaving him, however, in Manila. His revised address is Sgt. etc. 4025 Sig. Svc. Det., 5th Plt. Hq. Det. 1, APO 75, c/o PM, S.F. etc. This was about all he had time to write before he was called to duty (Yes, Dave, I called Kilner at once and let her know the new address).

Dan’s cablegram was short but a bit disconcerting. It read: “Register parcels henceforth. Theft evident. Dan.” Unfortunately most of the things he had asked for from time to time, including items of jewelry and a fur coat from Sears Roebuck, representing in all several hundred dollar’s worth of merchandise, had all been shipped before his cable arrived. We are now awaiting follow-up letter which will undoubtedly give us more details on the “theft evident” feature. There has hardly been sufficient time since the coat was shipped to have had it arrive, so I am hoping that will get through O.K. I am sorry now that I did not meticulously set down for record purposes the date of each parcel shipped and the contents thereof so that, if it would do any good, which I doubt, claim could be entered for missing articles. Without this date however, I am afraid filing a claim would be useless. Besides it may not have been that the looting occurred until after it left the jurisdiction of the U.S. authorities, if the packages have been chasing Dan around France under French government auspices. The Senechal card is a very attractive reproduction of the official seal of the City of Calais in colors and extends New Year’s greetings from the Senechal’s to all of us here.

Aunt Marian says her daughter Ruth (Rudolph’s sister) who is a teacher of _______ in the Univ. of Morgantown, has gone on a week’s vacation. She says Rudolph’s hospital unit turned over their hospital to a younger unit last September and then “sat in the mud” until Nov. 14th before starting home, thus missing Thanksgiving at his Madison home. He is now back at Wayne University.

Art Mantle and his new wife are home. She is from California I believe, but I have talked to no one yet who has met her. Red Sirene is now a civilian but it is too soon to have given him time to make any plans for his future. His wife works at McCall’s Magazine and they live in Brooklyn. Nellie Sperling is in the hospital with some tropical hold over from his service in the East. I am not sure whether it is malaria or some other tropical disease. Paul (Warden, he and his family live in the small apartment in the Trumbull House) is now working at Remington and is busy with plans to build a boat in collaboration with Walter Mantle. Zeke (Biss’s husband) is not making as much money now as his time at Singer’s (Sewing Machine) has been cut. G.E. strike still continues. A threatened Bpt. (Bridgeport) Brass strike has been averted. Dave Cronin died very suddenly of a heart attack while driving on White Plains Road in his car.


Tomorrow, more Special Pictures.

Next week I’ll be posting letters from 1942 when Grandpa is writing to his sons who are away from home.

Judy Guion


Trumbull – Dear Rover Boys (1) – Trumbull – News From Dan and Ced – February 3, 1946


Trumbull, Conn., Feb. 3, 1946

Dear Rover Boys:

Well, here it is February again. The groundhog came out yesterday, glanced at his shadow and went back in again, until six more months of cold weather have passed and then he will peek out again to see if Dave or Dan have made any definite homecoming plans, and I shall be looking over his shoulder to see what he sees. As for Ced, with rocket ships making the trip from coast to coast in four hours, all we need do is wire him in the morning that another of the family has come home and he can be with us in time for supper, provided of course he doesn’t have to spend too much time shinnying up the front porch pillar to make a surprise entry as he did before (Of course by that time he may have thought of some other method of ingress). But as I started to say before that groundhog switched me off the track, this is a short month and less than four weeks from now we will be in March and that comes pretty near marking the end of winter and the beginning not only of the Spring season but that welcome time when Europe and Asia will loosen their grasp on the rest of the Guion’s, and (in Dan’s case) plus.

Yesterday, Dan, your blanket started on its overseas journey and next week we will start on the civilian clothes for you. By the way, yesterday, two government checks by your order reached me and have been deposited to your account. This restores a good credit balance again so you can keep right on ordering your Trumbull purchasing agent to function without letting your conscience bother you.

For the delectation of the rest of you, here is what Dan says in the two letters that arrived last week, which by the way, marked up a 100% record with letters also from Ced and Dave. But unfortunately I find I left part of these at the office, so that there will not be a complete quotation. Here is what Dan says: “Epinal, France, 1/17/46, This is one of those persistent notes which serve merely to assure you that I am alive and well. I expect to be here in the Moselle Valley for a couple of weeks. I see Chiche more often these days. She is still at Douai and both she and “Jean-Pierre” are doing well. Please include half a dozen bibs in the layette – even our baby will probably drool a bit, or spill things. I get homesick quite often these days  — conditions are far from comfortable, in spite of posters which have been appearing throughout France lately  “Ca va deja mieux” – it goes already better. Ah well, each day brings me 24 hours closer to home.

(2 days later) In this Yankee deserted town it has taken me two days to borrow a stamp to mail this letter. In the interim it has suddenly become possible (through the kindness of the establishment in this hotel) to have Chiche come here to stay until the survey is finished. Naturally I am all excited at the prospect, so if you no longer get a 5-page letter from me every day during the next couple of weeks, I’m sure you’ll understand. Received the “Christmas Report” and a card from Al and Marian. Glad to hear that Cedric is back among his klootches.”

And here is what Ced contributes: “Things have settled down to the old routine — drab and uninteresting and too darn much to do with too little time to do it. Sunday I begin the week to the sound of Big Ben’s sweet and faithful chime from its face down position on the dressing table. I quit work at 4 in the afternoon, go home and clean up, out to dinner at a local boarding house, where for a dollar one can get a good home-cooked meal and eat as much as he likes. Then I generally go out to visit someone I have promised perhaps a dozen times to drop in on. To bed fairly early as work starts Monday morning at 7 A.M.

Page 2   2/3/46

necessitating a 6 o’clock arising again. Monday night after dinner at the boarding house I have a couple of hours to write or do some other necessary chore, then at 8 P.M. to bed and up at 4 A.M. Tuesday and out to work at 4:30. Off at 2 P.M. in the afternoon, and by the time I warm up the T-Craft and put in an hours flying time, it is again 4 P.M. and I go home, clean up and go out to eat at Lomen’s boarding house. To work at 7 A.M. Wednesday, and as I’m tired from the 4:30 A.M. morning, I haven’t much ambition and usually content myself with a short visit with friends again, and turn in early. So goes the rest of the week until Saturday which is my day off, but there are only 52 Saturdays in a year and if one happens to be cloudy it is more or less lost for recreational purposes. That becomes far too inadequate for my peace of mind, and so far I haven’t any more than looked at a pair of skis. Of course any work on the airplane has to be done on Saturday, and with all the work necessary on the Buick, things are in one heck of a shape. What is really wrong, I guess, is that the days are still too short. I am always droopy on the short days. Last Saturday I flew for about an hour and a half in the morning then I tore the engine of the plane apart and ground a valve which had been leaking since somewhere in Canada on the way up. I guess there was too much high octane gasoline put into it on the Canadian leg of the trip. What I did to the engine fixed it up in fine shape anyhow, and in spite of the fact that I worked on it till 2 A.M. Sunday morning, I was pleased to have the job done satisfactorily.”


Special Picture # 312 – Daniel Beck Guion and Alfred Peabody Guion – circa 1919

This is a 24 x 17  framed photograph that my parents, Lad and Marian Guion, had in their apartment. It is one of my favorites. I love the small smile on my Dad’s face. I didn’t really see his sense of humor very often. Then I saw pictures of Mom and Dad wearing costumes that Mom had made after they moved to California. They had joined an RV group and went on the weekend trips about once a month. I’ll find those pictures and post them soon.



Army Life – My Poor Salacious Siwash – Letter From Dan to Ced – August, 1942


     Daniel (Dan) Beck Guion

          Cedric (Ced) Duryee Guion

Dan is in Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, being trained by the Army in survey work and his younger brother remains in Anchorage, Alaska, working at the air base there, repairing and maintaining planes and flying as a Bush Pilot. 

DBG - My Poor Salacious Siwach - envelope front, Aug., 1942

Cedric “Frump” Guion

Anchorage, Alaska

DBG - My Poor Salacious Siwach - envelope back - Aug., 1942

The Examination Stamp

DBG - My Poor Salacioius Sewach - Dan to Ced - Aug., 1942

letter written on yellow lined paper in pencil


Roanoke Rapids

My Poor Salacious Siwach —

I again take up my pen(cil, sadly) with mounting misgivings, fearful lest the next letter from you, inspired by this one, will divulge some new heinous outrage perpetrated by you (and that handful of masculine harlotry living with you) against the gentle folk of pastoral Alaska.

But when duty calls, it always finds me right “on the ball” (eight) (or should I say “testicles”, to rhyme with “calls”?), Except when it comes to changing my luck – – – – I have decided to stop changing my luck, not because I do not need any better luck, but rather because I have learned, to my consternation, that these blue ball dispensing black belles are better un-bumped, taken from either side.

Kitty and Cortina:

If you or Kay can find any use in Anchorage for those records, or any potential customer (anything over $10), you may return them (or sell them). If they are serving no purpose, you might send them back home before the Japs mistake them for rye crisps and suffer indigestion !

Volly P. –

My best regards, and stick around! I’ll be back after the war if there is any after.

Rusty’s pipe –

The curfew tolls the knell of parting bedbugs. It is cheaper than conventional fumigation, anyhow!

Buick –

You are free to use your own judgment. Cars are actually worth less around here at present, but values will leap when gasoline and rubber become available and  new cars are not yet on the production lines. I suppose Alaska faces a similar situation.

Dad’s allusion about my being sent to Alaska – mostly the old A. D. imagination. I told him that rumors were extant concerning possible moves in the fall to foreign lands – – – – and Alaska was one meager possibility among several others, equally as meager.

My being pleased with the Army –

It’s malicious slander, that’s what it is! I like the place I live in. I like the survey work. I like the men who are on it with me, but my greatest pleasure would be to stand with my legs spread out and my cock in both hands, and piss on everything military, from the whistle at reveille until the whistle at “recall”, wetting down particularly the sections relating to discipline and silly military customs.


I have become a part (1/4) of a quartet, during the last week or so, and already have performed for the royal awestruck congregation at the 1st Baptist church, and for the local version of the R.F.A.D. (the vice of the Golden South). Tonight we four shall offer unction to the oafs at some corny revival meeting. It is for this meeting that I must close this letter, for time is bisecting itself with alarming rapidity, and I must away!

Give my regards to everyone, even Rutting Red, the Renegade –



The rest of the week will be filled with a letter from Lad to his Father, a letter from Grandpa to his “Truants”, another letter from Lad and another, longer letter from Grandpa, all written in August of 1942.

Judy Guion