Special Picture # 294 – Lad and Marian’s Trip to New Hampshire – 1945

 

After my Father returned from France but before he was released from the Army, he had a furlough and he and my Mom, took a tour of New Hampshire, with one stop at the Island. I don’t know where two of the pictures were taken but I believe one was on Lake Winnipesaukee and the other was at the top of Mt. Washington.

Lad and Marian next to the train engine at the top of Mt. Washington, New Hampshire.

Marian and Lad relaxing at their campsite.

Lad taking a quick nap at their campsite.

A friend, Marian and Lad boating on Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire.

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Special Picture # 293 – Dave and Butch’s Baptism – June, 1940

This is an excerpt from a letter written to my father, Lad, while he was in Venezuela in June of 1940.

This morning I got up at nine and got the dinner started and then rushed up and got dressed for church, because this was the day Mr. Bollman had appointed for baptismal services, and not only was young grandson to be baptized along with three other babies, but our own David was also to receive the same sacrament along with Evelyn Hughes and Robert Shattuck. Your nephew was very good during the entire ceremony but celebrated by wetting himself afterwards while his father was holding him. They decided to leave on this account before the ceremony was over and stopped at MacKenzie’s drugstore on the way home because Zeke was thirsty. Baby evidently did not approve of this because he upset a glass of Coca-Cola and Mac, in his haste to mop up the spilling, upset another glass himself.

These pictures were all taken on the same day. Both Dave and Raymond, Jr. (Butch) were baptized on June 9, 1940

Grandpa, Dick, Ced, Biss, Zeke holding Raymond, Jr. (Butch) and Dan.

Biss and Raymond Jr. (Butch)

Dan holding Butch and Ced

 

Raymond, Jr. (Butch) and Dan on the side lawn

Trumbull – Dan’s Furlough and Dick’s Physical – June, 1942

 

Trumbull, Conn., June 28, 1942

Dear Boys:

Dan-uniform (2)

The big News this week is the telegram I got from Dan Thursday telling me his 10-day furlough had just been granted and to wire him 20 smackers so that he could pay his fare home. He arrived Friday about supper time but alas, having eaten something that did not digest so well along with hot weather, lack of sleep etc., he felt rather low upon arrival, but after heaving up what remained of the causus “belli” and getting some sleep, he attained his pristine condition and has since been luxuriating in doing just what he darned pleases to do whenever and wherever the fancy strikes him. No high-pressure parties or exciting doings such as you see described in LIFE as the typical doughboy on leave doin’s, but all that is necessary is for it to satisfy him. He has to be back by reveille July 4th and there is just a bare possibility I may be able to arrange things so that I can go back with him, stopping at Aberdeen enroute to check up on my other soldier. Of course what I should like to do would be to make this trip via Anchorage and drop in on my pilot son and find out why he doesn’t write a bit more frequently, but until they get that road finished I guess I’ll have to forgo that pleasure. Dan says he has come to place little credence on the many rumors that continually float around as to where his unit might be sent, but one which he hopes will materialize is a report they might be sent to Alaska to do some mapping work.

Dick took his physical at Shelton Tuesday and apparently the doctor found no reason why he should not be acceptable to his Uncle Sammy, so I suppose hefore long I shall be driving my third boy up to the Derby railroad station. Apparently I’m supposed to keep this up indefinitely.

As for your requests, Lad old bean, don’t you know one way to make me happy is to give me something to do for any of you boys. I only regret in true Nathan Hale style that I can do so little. Perhaps I will bring down with me what you want in the way of boxes, watch and coat hangers. If I don’t go I’ll mail them to you. On the battery, I called up Remington Rand and they told me they did not handle these anymore but did give me the name of a concern in the west to whom I immediately wrote for information, prices, but have not yet had a reply. I was a bit puzzled on the razor matter. You asked if we had one we could spare. I could not dope out whether you meant a dry shaver or a safety razor. If the former and you did not have a battery I could not see how that would help it, if the latter, you said the Army had furnished you with a Gillette, so I’m kinder up a tree on that one.

Aunt Betty

 

Aunt Betty says: “Give my love to the boys and tell them I think of them often even though I don’t say anything.”

For your information, Ced, Lad is out of the hospital. His stay was brief and on return to duty he was transferred to Co. D, 8th Bn. for his second period of training. It lasts 8 weeks and he will not be able to get leave until sometime after the middle of July. He is now being trained for a non-com rating and instructorship which means a pretty heavy schedule from _ A.M. to 8 P.M.

And Lad, I have been intending in every letter to tell you that the Gladstone bag with your clothes in it arrived safely. I had the soiled things washed and put away and your woolen outerwear hung in my moth proofed closet.

DAD

*************************************

This penny postcard from Lad to his father, Grandpa, was written on June 30, 1942 and post marked July 1, 1942. It was sent to Grandpa’s business address in Bridgeport, probably because mail sent there would be delivered sooner.Notice there is no zip code. Penny postcards really did exist.

APG - Postal from Lad at Aberdeen - June, 1942

APG - Postal from Lad at Aberdeen - message - June, 1942

Tues. Aft. 6/30/42

Dear Sir:-

I am trying to put 4 years of teacher training into my head in 6 days__!  Wow!!! I shouldn’t even be taking this time, but I have 10 minutes between classes for a smoke and instead of writing my lessons, I’m trying to tell you that this is the longest “letter” you will get this week. I spent Sunday in a little preparatory reading and didn’t write at all. I got your letter this noon and sincerely hope you can find time to make a stop in Aberdeen. However, I would not be able to see you if you come before Friday, I’m afraid. Also, there is a rumor that there may be a parade in Balto (Baltimore?). Saturday, and if so, I may have to go. If so, why not wait here for me to return? Anyhow – here’s hoping. I don’t remember if I mentioned the receipt of the $5.00. Anyhow I got it. Thanks. See you soon, and there goes the whistle – Lad

Tomorrow and Sunday, more Special Pictures.

On Monday, I’ll begin posting a week of letters from 1943. It is December and the is coming to a close.

Judy Guion

 

Army Life – Dear Dad – Moving Up the Ladder – June, 1942

 

APG - Letter from Aberdeen, Moving up the ladder, June 21, 1942 - pg. 1

APG - Lad's Letter from Aberdeen - Moving up the ladder - June, 21, 1942 - pg. 2

APG - Army Life - Letter from Aberdeen - Moving up the ladder - June 21, 1942 - pg. 3

June 21st, 1942

Dear Dad –

Please note change of address above. I have succeeded in the first step up the ladder, but it also has its drawbacks. I cannot leave here for at least five weeks. And then, between then and the termination of my second period of training, I might be able to get home once. At most twice. This second period covers eight weeks from today.

I am now located in the Cadre School, where I will receive the training for a non-com and instructorship. If I go through with flying colors, I have a chance at Officers Training. Our Co. Commander gave us a little talk yesterday afternoon and apparently we will have little time for anything but study. Therefore, please don’t feel slighted if you don’t hear much from me in the next two months. I’ll do the best I can, but study is going to come first. Our days starts at 7:15 AM and ends at 8:30 PM. Between 6:00 and 7:15 AM we clean house and shave and eat breakfast.

I got out of the hospital yesterday morning at 8:30 and upon my arrival at Barracks 2-Bn. 1, I was told that I had to be ready to move to Co. D at 9:00. I really had to rush to make it, but I did. I helped put up tents, we live in 12’ x 12’ tents, and heard a lecture given by our C.O. Other than that, we did very little except to arrange our own stuff and clean up around our tent. Six men live in each tent, and since there is no electricity, we can’t do much after 9:00.

Today, being Sunday, we haven’t had to do very much, but it has been far more than had we still been in Bn. 1. Our Co. is made up of 4 platoons, and I’m in the second. Each day one of the four is assigned to guard duty about the area, and today is plat. 2. Then Guion being right up near the top of the list, since 2nd plat. is made up of men in G,H,I,J,K & L, I am on guard at present, on relief # 3. I have just finished the first guard, 4:00 is 6:00 P.M. I go on again at 10:00 till 12:00 and once more at 4:00 to 6:00 A.M. More on Co. D of the 8th when I get a chance.

I’m sorry I never mentioned having received the hangers, but I did (7) and I would like some more if you can find any (6). The stronger the better, and only all-steel. And there are a few other things I would like. In repairing my razor, Schick did not do such a good job and I’d like to send it back again, and therefore, send me one from home to use temporarily, Fine, if not, just say so. The Army supplied me with a safety razor which I’m using just now. Also, since we have no electricity, I would like to have you send me one of those 110 V. Batteries. The only ones I have seen so far have been made by Rem. Rand Shaver Div. Maybe you can’t get one of those either, but I’d like to have you try. I intended to go into Baltimore or Philadelphia and get one, but I can’t get out of here at all. Another thing is my watch. I left it upstairs in the attic, on the little table by the N. E.  window near a book called “Semper Fidelis”. My Elgin came in this book (or box as it actually is) and you can use it for the watch. In turn I will send back my Elgin for cleaning and general checking I don’t like to ask you to do all of these things, but I was really planning to be home either this  weekend or next weekend, and now I can’t make it for quite some time, and it all has to be done. However, don’t put yourself out, as there really isn’t any terrific rush. I think that is all, at present. Oh!! No –2 things more. I took with me to Camp Devens, Dick’s Gladstone bag. Did you or he ever get it back with clothes of mine in it? And also, I would like three or four rather sturdy, but small, boxes, like candy boxes (1 lb.) or the like and not too shallow. A couple of inches deep, 4” to 6” x 4” to 8”. They will be used put loose things of like materials (shoe shining equip., etc.) in my duffel bag. We do not have footlockers here.

You asked me what “Addere Flamman” means. Literally, I don’t know, but I suppose it means “Flaming Bomb”, which is the Ordnance Dep’t. Insignia.

Well, I seem to have run out of thoughts, Dad, so I guess I’ll have to call it quits. Remember me to all and sundry, and good health and luck.

Lad

Tomorrow, a quick postcard from Lad and a letter from Grandpa.

On Saturday and Sunday, more Special Pictures.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Students (2) – Lad’s Car and Dave at the Office – June, 1942

 

Dave’s school term is pretty nearly over, but I hastened it a bit by keeping him out of school Thursday and Friday to help rush out a 15,000 letter mailing for Ashcroft which had to be in the mail last week to comply with a government ruling (They are doing 100% war work over there). We did it, too, although we were delayed in getting the necessary letterheads until Wednesday noon. He is

 

Page 2   6/121/42

developing into quite a considerable help to me in the work at the office and is getting on to things in good shape. I may put him out on sales work this summer and he is considering the advisability of changing his school course from college prep. to commercial. The only full-time employee I have at the office has returned from a two weeks honeymoon and then had to stay out half the week with a cold, in addition. In spite of this, if I hear from Dan favorably, I may be able to arrange to get off for a few days to go down to see Dan and Lad in their natural habitat, leaving Dave to run the office and Aunt Betty to hold down the doormat.

Dick has received notification to appear for his physical exam at Shelton at 2:30 Tuesday, and Red also received a similar notice for the same day and hour later. The latter, however, is trying to get a deferment so that he can finish his summer course at Pratt.

The sewer drain pipe, which for a week has been leaking back into the cellar and filling the house with a most unholy stench, has now been fixed, and while there is still water in the cellar, the bad smell is clearing up. This condition has prevented our making a search of the cellar for old rubber in the national drive to “get in the scrap”.

As there seems to be no further news of interest to report, I shall and with a little poem:

A stamp’s a tiny, flimsy thing

No thicker than a beetle’s wing

And yet, ‘twill roam the world for you

Exactly where you tell it to.

But Dan and Ced too often fail

To put the damn thing in the mail.

                                      DAD

Tomorrow, another letter from Lad at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Aberdeen, Maryland. On Friday, another letter from Grandpa.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Students (1) – Lad’s Car and Dave at the Office – June, 1942

 

???????????????????

Trumbull, Conn., June 21, 1942

Students!

In true K. Kyser fashion, I have been putting myself through a series of mental tests and believe I have the right answers. There’s Lad, to start off with the oldest. He is at the Proving Grounds. “Proving what?”  you ask. Why, proving that no matter how tired or overworked he is, he can still find time to write a weekly letter home. Dan has recently had T-5 tacked onto his name. I don’t know how the  C. O. got wind of the fact that he is very reticent about boosting morale of the boys back on the home front, but I suspect “T” stands for taciturn raised to the 5th degree. And as for Ced, it’s beginning to dawn on me that the word Anchorage, according to Webster meaning that to which anything is fastened, must refer to the difficulty Ced finds in prying letters free from his typewriter. In any event, Lad is the only one this week that has kept the home fires burning, and to him, therefore, on this June day go our grateful thanks.

Lad’s car is not yet sold but the wife of the man who was interested in it called me up yesterday and said her husband was still interested. I told her the least we could accept was $675 cash. She said her husband would probably get in touch with me later as he still had bought no other car. The morning following that on which I received Lads letter naming this bottom price, as I went out to the barn to get into my own car, I saw that Lad’s left front tire was as flat as they ever get, so I had Carl come over at once to fix it up, so that I would not be embarrassed in having my customer come up to look at the car and find the tires kaploot. (Siwash for flat.)

The Government has just passed a new miracle, as they say in Green Pastures, to the effect that all notes for less than $1000 must be paid off within a year, and accordingly the bank notified Lad, through me, that the current payments of $50 a month he had been paying were not large enough to comply with this ruling. I pointed out the hardship placed upon the boys drafted into the service at that low rate of pay, even with the proposed raise, in paying off debts contracted in good faith and with every indication of being able to reasonably meet payments while employed in industry, under the new ruling. They agreed with me that it was most unreasonable but pointed out they had not made the law. I finally took it up with the head of the bank and finally wangled a renewal of Lad’s note without further payment on principle, but with interest, until August 5th, by which time it was thought that some adjustment might be found. That is the way the matter stands today.

Lad says he is now about starting and 8 weeks technical training course, at the end of which time he may be permitted to bring down a car. He had mentioned the possibility of perhaps coming home this weekend, so I got an extra box of strawberries from Mr. Laufer for dessert and kept one ear cocked for a phone call until 10:45 last night – – and then sadly retired to my little bed.

Tomorrow, the rest of this letter, then one from Lad and another from Grandpa.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Lad Writes From Aberdeen Hospital – June, 1942

 

Aberdeen Hospital – June 18

Dear Dad – etc.: –

Boy, am I soft. One night on bivouac and I got sick. A second night and I’m sent to the hospital. Here is the story. As you may remember, I had a slight cold when I left home. The first night in Devens (Ft. Devens, Massachusetts) didn’t help much and since then I have been going so hard that I have not had a chance to get enough rest. And anyway, Aberdeen is rather a humid place. Well, one day, my cold would be pretty good and then the next it would be worse, and I figured that if I could hold out until my first five weeks were up, I’d be able to get a little rest or even go to the hospital and get well cured.

We left Aberdeen Sunday morning as planned and got to our camp location about 10:30 A. M., attended a conglomerate service and started clearing land for tent locations. Went to eat and returned to finish cleaning. Pitched tents and prepared everything for the evening. Went for a swim in the bay and dressed for supper. Ate and had the evening to ourselves. I went down and sat on the beach until sundown and retired.

Monday – after a cold sleepless night on damp ground – most of the Co. had some sort of cold, some of their’s worse than mine. After calisthenics and breakfast, Co. A, & B attended a lecture ending with one on map reading and then a treasure hunt. I had no ambition and did not even come in 15th. Then lunch and Co. A & B started clearing the campgrounds where C & D had left off. Here I got a good dose of poison ivy. Since we had no water except in the bay and chlorinated drinking water, in order to clean up we had to swim so I went in again. Afterward, I really felt better. Then retreat, supper, a rifle check and another free evening. Watched a ballgame and saw Co. B lose to Co. A., then I retired.

Slept fine but got up Tuesday feeling lousy, and with a sore throat and chills. Had my throat painted and went on with regular work. By noon the chills were worse and I reported to the First Aid tent. Then I was told to pack my stuff and be ready to sail back at 2:30 with the mail boat. We left at 3:00. Got to A.P.G. (Aberdeen Proving Ground) at 5:00 and ate supper. Reported to hospital at 7:30 and was assigned to a bed (No. 18) in Ward 15. Was given enough medicine to kill everything I ever had or will have (except poison ivy) and went to bed.

Wed. I felt better but stayed in bed and slept most of the day. Given med. three times per day.

Today, my throat is quite sore, but I feel better otherwise than I have since I entered the Army. I think that with a little rest, I’ll be tip-top again.

Well, that is up to the present. For the future – – – I don’t even think that I’ll be released from here to make it home this weekend, but I’m still hoping. Nothing further as yet on my immediate future.

I’ve not received any mail, because it came out to the camp on the same boat that took me back, and it was not distributed until after I had gone. However, I should get some sometime today.

You had better not expect me home this weekend. More later – – my love to Aunt Betty and the rest.

Lad

For the rest of the week, I’ll be posting a letter from Grandpa to Dan and Lad, the only boys in Uncle Sam’s service right now, then another from Lad and a final letter from Grandpa.

Judy Guion