Army Life – Dear Dad – Back to California – February, 1944

Blog - Lad's new address in Pomona, CA - Feb., 1944

Blog - Lad's telegram with new address and new insignia with four stripes - Feb., 1944

1416 Stratford Ave.

South Pasadena, Calif.

Box 491

Dear Dad –

Your “Valentine” has arrived safely and is a most welcome addition to our household belongings – and just think – no laundry problem! Such attractive paper towels are

Marian Irwin

Marian Irwin

really a big help and I’m a firm believer in using the placemats any chance I get. Thanks very much for thinking of me, Dad.

Lad’s package arrived, too, just in time for St. Patrick’s Day – and matching the day beautifully. He’d send his thanks in person, if he had time to write any letters, but Uncle Sam keeps him so busy that he only has time to eat and sleep when he’s at home. So I’m saying “thank you”, from him, this time.

We are still house hunting – but not very successfully. Last Sunday we combined house hunting with the picnic – it was a beautiful day for it – cloudy and a drizzle that was very much like rain! But we didn’t let that stop us. The house we were looking at was about 10 or 12 miles from the Pomona, and if it were on a more traveled road we would have taken it. It was really a weekend cabin – not too modern, but clean and quiet. No electricity nor hot water, but we wouldn’t have minded that. The only drawback was that if anything happened to the car, Lad would have practically no way of getting to Camp. And Uncle Sam is sort of particular about his being there on time and when he is supposed to. So we very regretfully had to say “No”. We have now acquired a trailer, so the next time we moved it won’t be quite so hard on the car. This isn’t the house variety, although we’ve threatened to get one of those, too. But our trailer is a two -wheel kind, about 6 feet long and 2 feet high and about 4 feet wide. It is very sturdily built, and is good-looking, too.

Remember my saying that I was having my allotment check sent to you and that you could forward it to us? Well it must take time to change the address in their files, for I’m still receiving it at South Pasadena. But you will probably receive the next one.

Love to everyone.

Lad and Marian

Tomorrow I’ll post a letter from Grandpa bringing everyone up-to-date on what has been happening with various members of the family.

Judy Guion


Army Life – Marian Writes to the Home Folks – I Took a Civil Service Exam – February, 1944

Marian Irwin Guion (Mrs. Lad)

Marian Irwin Guion (Mrs. Lad)

Wednesday –

Dear Dad, Aunt Betty and Jean – Ced, too – ‘cause I imagine he’s there also—

Life in Texas seems very serene these days. Not too much excitement, and Uncle Samuel has been keeping Lad so busy that he hasn’t had time to think, but he has gotten home every night so far, so I’m not complaining in the least – for that is much more than I expected. Don’t know how long this will continue, but just being near enough that I can see him occasionally is all I ask.

Valentine’s Day being our third (month) anniversary, we were going to celebrate, but Uncle Sammy stepped in and decided that Lad should work until 9 PM that evening. However, we did have dinner together, slightly rushed, I will admit. – but that in itself is an occasion! Just think of all the celebrating we are going to be able to do when this is all over!

Dad, we are sending you one of our wedding gifts that we would like to have you put in Lad’s safe deposit box. It is a $25 War Bond, and we don’t want to carry it around with us.

I took the civil service exam yesterday, so if I passed the test and they still need office workers, I may be working at the Red River Ordnance Depot. I should know the results the first of next week, so perhaps our next letter will tell whether or not I have a job. Being a lady of leisure has been very nice so far, but with no house to take care of, I’m hoping to be able to work at least part of the time, so that I’ll have something to keep me busy during the day.

I’m going to wait to mail this letter, and also one to Dan, in case Lad gets home early enough to add a few lines to them. He’s had to work every night this week, so far, so I’m not sure whether he will even get home – needless to say – I hope so – .

Love to all



P.S.   Sorry, Dad, but I better get this in the mail before you think a Texas tornado has done away with the Lad Guions! Received your letter yesterday – we were glad to hear that Ced has been deferred and are waiting in hopes that we will be able to see him before he returns to Alaska. If he left immediately, I guess he couldn’t stop off in Texas, for he would have been here by now, but if he couldn’t get a reservation until later this week, perhaps we will see him after all. Needless to say, we certainly hope so!

Lad has been working so hard he hasn’t had time to think, let alone write letters! Maybe next time – and that roast beef you mentioned had us practically drooling! How we would have loved to be there! In fact we got so hungry that we had a late evening snack. The best Texas had to offer was crackers spread with peanut butter and one lone candy bar! A far cry from delicious roast beef!

Love —


Tomorrow, a long letter from Grandpa, on Wednesday, another letter from Marian and on Thursday and Friday, another letter from Grandpa.

Judy Guion


Special Picture # 317 – Alfred Peabody Guion – 1917

These are pictures of my Dad, Lad, taken about 1917.





Tomorrow, another Special Pictures.

On Monday letters from 1944 .Marian is following Lad wherever the Army sends him. Dan is overseas. Ced is still in Alaska, Dick is in Brazil and Dave is working on his Basic Training.

Judy Guion


Trumbull – Dear Ceddie, Dearie (1) – News From Family and Friends – September 13, 1942

It is now September, 1942. Dan has been in the Army since January and Lad went in at the beginning of May. Both are in training, Dan in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Lad in Aberdeen, Maryland. They were close enough to come home for the weekend whenever they could get a pass. For Grandpa’s birthday they were both able to get home and several of their friends were gathered at the Trumbull house. They all contributed to this letter to Ced, in Anchorage, Alaska.

Ced @ 1945

Trumbull, Conn., September 13, 1942

Dear Ceddy, Dearie,

We have been gaping at the photographs of those odd natives you sent us. We were particularly intrigued by an old, hairy, buck with a siwash mop-whiskers. The disheveled moss halo lends a certain amount of character to an otherwise stolid face. In one of the photos I was able to distinguish the nondescript physiognomy of “Fish-wheel Red”, that nefarious White Indian who used to perform orgies with panties pilfered from unwary clotheslines. Shabby Schaller is still infesting your locality, I see.

Since this is destined to assume the proportions of a round-robin letter, I shall limit myself to three or four pages, which will be concerned primarily with allowing others to have their say, effective immediately……………………………



Although this is the first word that you will hear from me, it is not the first attempt at writing you a letter. Some time ago I wrote to you and just the other day the letter came back to me saying that I had made mention of something of military value, so that the letter could not be forwarded to you in that condition. Well, naturally, I intend to make the necessary corrections and will, in due time, forward the original or a corrected copy. But as was so aptly stated by our literary friend and comrade in arms previously, this is to be a combination letter from various of those infesting Trumbull, and therefore I do not like to take up the necessary space here to write all that I would like. I notice that Dan has omitted the most important fact, that being that we all, with the exception of you, were able to make Trumbull for Dad’s birthday.

Ced – I am going to leave now so I have interrupted Alfred’s note to put in my two cents worth. My branch of the family is fine except for the usual bumps and bangs that kids usually get. Zeke is working 13 hours a night now and guess he will continue so for the duration. However, it gives us a nice income and at the rate we are going, we hope to have the house paid for by 1 March. Please write me a nice long letter and I promise I will answer it within a year. Both the kids are getting pretty big now and I will send you a picture of them when I get your letter.

—Biss & family

(continuation of the addition above) As usual, he paid off instead of accepting. However we did make a little token in his behalf. But I’ll let him take care of that end himself. And now since my time has reached the end of the allocated space, I shall nonchalantly set aside and let the next in line it take up the touch…


On Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, I’ll post the rest of this letter. On Friday, a letter from Dan’s girlfriend, Barbara to Ced.

Judy Guion


Army Life – Hello! Everyone at Home – Birthday Gifts For Lad – February, 1944


Hello! Everyone at Home –

Here we are “deep in the heart of Texas”, and altho’ it isn’t a place that we would choose to build our own home, at least it isn’t too bad. I know that it is quite disconcerting to Lad, but I’ve taught school for three years in a place in California that is exactly like this, so I know what to expect. And as long as it is possible, I intend to stay with Lad, no matter where he is sent.

For the time being we are staying at a fairly nice Auto Court – The Blue Streak! (Room and bath, if you please!) And have our application in at the Federal Housing Tract which is near. We could move in right away, if we had furniture, or wanted to buy it, but we don’t want to get anything right now, so we have to wait until they can furnish some more of the houses.

We are about 5 miles from Camp, and except when he has a night hike or C.2. (?) scheduled, Lad can get home practically every night. Just so that I will have something to do during the day, I am going to try to get some kind of a job. Exactly what, I don’t know, but am going to see about it in a few days.

Lad’s training is really strenuous, and what with the wet, rainy weather we have been having, is none too pleasant. He doesn’t complain however and I’m so glad to be here that the water could be a foot deep outside and I wouldn’t even notice. It rains in California, too – the Chamber of Commerce, notwithstanding!

We don’t know what our mailing address will be, so for the time being continue to send those very interesting letters of yours to Lad’s address at Camp.

I forgot to warn you, Dad, that I was sending some of Lad’s things home – they are things that can just be stored until he gets there to sort them out.

We think your suggestion about a picture is an excellent one – in fact, we had it in mind to do as soon as we were settled – so we will send one to you as soon as we can.


Needless to say, I’m extremely glad Marian is here. It makes Texas quite a bit nicer, and she apparently likes it better than I had dared hope. Now you all may get a little more attention from me again. Since Marion wrote, we have acquired a mailing address. It is Box 154, Hooks, Texas.

Our basic training should end this Saturday and on Monday we will begin our 11 weeks of technical training. I am to help out with the instruction, along with 8 or 10 others. I’m supposed to sort of cram automotive electricity into the already cluttered brains of the trainees. It seems that this post is slightly understaffed for a Bn. as large as this. But everyone is glad Basic is nearly finished. We have our inspection tomorrow, and to be on the ball I’ve got to get some sleep so —– Laddie


Dad – I have a Valentine for you, but until we can get suitable packing material I shall have to wait to mail it to you. But it is coming –

With all our love,




P.S. – Fellow conspirator –

I received your letter in the mail tonight and I honestly don’t know what to tell you to get Lad for his birthday. Everything in the way of clothes that he needs is issued to him – and the Army has specific ideas about the type they should be. He does need some plain white (no initial) handkerchiefs – the kind that don’t have much of a border on them. And he wants a small sewing kit – and I do mean small. No bigger than the size of a spool of thread – with needles and pins and tiny spools of black, white or khaki colored thread. I have been unable to find one here. He can always use cigarettes (Luckies) if you are able to get a carton of them – And some plain white stationary – (rather lightweight paper)

Practically the only things he uses outside of things issued by the government are his electric razor (still in good condition) and his fountain pen – (he has two of those)

You see what I mean? I realize that I’m not much help, Dad, but this is absolutely all I can offer. Perhaps you have a few ideas on the subject that would be most acceptable. I think you do remarkably well as it is.

Love –



Army Life – Dear Dad and Assembled Members of the Guion Family – Moving Without a Car – January, 1944



1416 Stratford Ave.

South Pasadena, Calif.

Dear Dad and assembled members of the Guion family,

I’m afraid that I’ve neglected you this past week – not in my thoughts, however – tho’ very definitely in regards to letter writing.

This business of packing sort of has me stumped. Here to fore,  Mother has always been on hand to forward anything I happened to forget, or take care of the many things I didn’t know what to do with. This time, however, I have to figure it out by myself – and not being able to move in a car is another handicap. Now I have to wrap everything or put it in a box or suitcase instead of just throwing it in the back of the car! It’s been so long since I’ve tried to move without a car that I don’t know how to act.

We were so sorry to hear about Ced. It must be very nice to have him home for a longer time than you expected, but I wish it were under more favorable circumstances. I sincerely hope that everything will work out just the way he wishes.

What a very interesting person Lad’s Grandmother must have been. I wish that I could have met her. Your lives have been just that much richer, haven’t they, by having her with you for as long as she was here.

I also received a very interesting letter from Aunt Elsie last week. She spoke of having been to California some years ago and having liked it very much. I’m looking forward to meeting her, and I hope it will be very soon.

Thank you Aunt Betty for your letter – I am glad the sweater meets with your approval, and Lad is the one who deserves the credit for the right size.

I’m surprised that I can get anything done this week. I’m so excited about finally being able to join Lad that I’m practically in a daze! Did I tell you that he has found a place for us to stay? Not too fancy, but that makes absolutely no difference.

With love to everyone,


P.S. You see, I took your suggestion about the green ink, Dad. I like it very much.


I believe this writing paper was a Christmas gift from Lad to Marian, but Grandpa actually printed it from Lad’s design suggestion.

Tomorrow I’ll post a letter from Grandpa to the Gang, then another letter from Marian (and Lad), and I’ll finish off the week with two letters from Grandpa.

Judy Guion


Special Picture # 312 – Daniel Beck Guion and Alfred Peabody Guion – circa 1919

This is a 24 x 17  framed photograph that my parents, Lad and Marian Guion, had in their apartment. It is one of my favorites. I love the small smile on my Dad’s face. I didn’t really see his sense of humor very often. Then I saw pictures of Mom and Dad wearing costumes that Mom had made after they moved to California. They had joined an RV group and went on the weekend trips about once a month. I’ll find those pictures and post them soon.