Army Life – Dear Dad – Lad and Marian Search For A Home In Pomona, California – March, 1944

Marian Irwin

Marian (Irwin) Guion

1416 Stratford Ave.

South Pasadena, Calif.

Box 491

Dear Dad –

Your “Valentine” has arrived safely and is a most welcome addition to our household belongings – and just think – no laundry problem! Such attractive paper towels are really a big help and I’m a firm believer in using the placemats any chance I get. Thanks very much for thinking of me, Dad.

Lad’s package arrived, too, just in time for St. Patrick’s Day – and matching the day beautifully. He’d send his thanks in person, if he had time to write any letters, but Uncle Sam keeps him so busy that he only has time to eat and sleep when he’s at home. So I’m saying “thank you”, for him, this time.

We are still house hunting – but not very successfully. Last Sunday we combined house hunting with the picnic – it was a beautiful day for it – cloudy and a drizzle that was very much like rain! But we didn’t let that stop us. The house we were looking at was about 10 or 12 miles from the Pomona, and if it were on a more traveled road we would have taken it. It was really a weekend cabin – not too modern, but clean and quiet. No electricity nor hot water, but we wouldn’t have minded that. The only drawback was that if anything happened to the car, Lad would have practically no way of getting to Camp. And Uncle Sam is sort of particular about his being there on time and when he is supposed to. So we very regretfully had to say “No”. We have now acquired a trailer, so the next time we moved it won’t be quite so hard on the car. This isn’t the house variety, although we’ve threatened to get one of those, too. But our trailer is a two -wheel kind, about 6 feet long and 2 feet high and about 4 feet wide. It is very sturdily built, and is good-looking, too.

Remember my saying that I was having my allotment check sent to you and that you could forward it to us? Well it must take time to change the address in their files, for I’m still receiving it at South Pasadena. But you will probably receive the next one.

Love to everyone.

Lad and Marian

Tomorrow and for the next week, I will be posting letters written in 1940 when Lad was the only son away from home. He is working for the Socony-Vacuum Oil Company as a mechanic, keeping their vehicles and Diesel pumps at their wells operating smoothly.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Dear Dad, Aunt Betty, etc., – New Rating – February 28, 1944

Blog - Lad's telegram with new address and new insignia with four stripes - Feb., 1944

Feb., 28, 1944

Dad, Aunt Betty, etc.,:-

Lad'swedding photo (2)

Alfred Peabody Guion (Lad) 

As stated in the telegram I have been upped of grade. It is no longer a straight rating however. It is a technicians rating known to us as ”T” ratings. My official title in writing like Dan’s and Dick’s, is T/3, but I am still addressed as Sgt. The big point is that it puts me up into the “first three grader” classification, and means $18 more per month. I now draw $96 plus $35 for Marian.

It looks like this – 3 up and 1 down enclosing a “T”. It should not be mistaken for what is called a Tech Sgt. This latter rating draws $114. I am a T/3 or a Sgt. Technician, third grade.

Three days before leaving for California from Texas, the Buick clutch started to slip so I had to put in a new one. To do it I needed a free day and the first one I could get was the Monday of last week which was the first day of traveling time. Therefore, we stayed in Hooks until Monday instead of leaving Sunday night. Had it not been for the clutch, we would never have seen Ced. He showed up at Hooks early Monday morning. We all went into Hooks together and while the car was being fixed, we ate, chatted, took a couple of pictures and Ced left at 3 PM. He seems fine, but has changed a little in the interval since I last saw him over five years ago. He’s a little heavier and his hair is darker, and he has matured a great deal. He’s still the same old Ced otherwise. The details of the trip out here will come later. Love to all.

Laddie

Tomorrow, a letter from Marian with more information on their visit with Ced and the trip from Texarkana, Texas, to Pomona, California.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Boy, Am I Soft – June 18, 1942

Lad Guion with friend - Pomona - 1944 (2) head shot

Alfred Peabody Guion (Lad)

Aberdeen Hospital – June 18th

Dear Dad – etc.: –

Boy, am I soft. One night on bivouac and I got sick. A second night and I’m sent to the hospital. Here is the story. As you may remember, I had a slight cold when I left home (May 15, 1942). The first night in Devens (Ft. Devens, Ayer, Massachusetts) didn’t help much and since then I have been going so hard that I have not had a chance to get enough rest. And anyway, Aberdeen is rather a humid place. Well, one day, my cold would be pretty good and then the next it would be worse, and I figured that if I could hold out until my first five weeks were up, I’d be able to get a little rest or even go to the hospital and get well cured.

We left Aberdeen Sunday morning as planned and got to our camp location about 10:30 A. M., attended a conglomerate service and started clearing land for tent locations. Went to eat and returned to finish cleaning. Pitched tents and prepared everything for the evening. Went for a swim in the bay and dressed for supper. Ate and had the evening to ourselves. I went down and sat on the beach until sundown and retired.

Monday – after a cold sleepless night on damp ground – most of the Co. had some sort of cold, some of their’s worse than mine. After calisthenics and breakfast, Co. A, & B attended a lecture ending with one on map reading and then a treasure hunt. I had no ambition and did not even come in 15th. Then lunch and Co. A & B started clearing the campgrounds where C & D had left off. Here I got a good dose of poison ivy. Since we had no water except in the bay and chlorinated drinking water, in order to clean up we had to swim so I went in again. Afterward, I really felt better. Then retreat, supper, a rifle check and another free evening. Watched a ballgame and saw Co. B lose to Co. A., then I retired.

Slept fine but got up Tuesday feeling lousy, and with a sore throat and chills. Had my throat painted and went on with regular work. By noon the chills were worse and I reported to the First Aid tent. Then I was told to pack my stuff and be ready to sail back at 2:30 with the mail boat. We left at 3:00. Got to A.P.G. (Lad’s initials but here it means Aberdeen Proving Grounds) at 5:00 and ate supper. Reported to hospital at 7:30 and was assigned to a bed (No. 18) in Ward 15. Was given enough medicine to kill everything I ever had or will have (except poison ivy) and went to bed.

Wed. I felt better but stayed in bed and slept most of the day. Given med. three times per day.

Today, my throat is quite sore, but I feel better otherwise than I have since I entered the Army. I think that with a little rest, I’ll be tip-top again.

Well, that is up to the present. For the future – – – I don’t even think that I’ll be released from here to make it home this weekend, but I’m still hoping. Nothing further as yet on my immediate future.

I’ve not received any mail, because it came out to the camp on the same boat that took me back, and it was not distributed until after I had gone. However, I should get some sometime today.

You had better not expect me home this weekend. More later – – my love to Aunt Betty and the rest.

Lad

Tomorrow, a letter from Grandpa with a little hint about getting letters from his sons.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Lad Wonders What The Army Has in Store For Him – June 13, 1942

Lad - 1943

Alfred Peabody Guion (Lad)

June 13

Dear Dad: –

Excuse me for not writing sooner, but I have been trying to find out something definite as to my status with the U.S. Army. It looks as though I am to stay here for some time yet, and I can have a car here later, but it all depends on what the bank says as to whether I will sell it or not. In case I have to sell it, I’d accept $700 or even $675 in cash. I’ll let you more or less decide that issue. If this new bill goes through concerning the raise in pay for soldiers, I could probably pay $25/month, but not much more.

Today we finish our basic training and tomorrow at 4:00 a.m. we get up in preparation for departure at 5:15 on our bivouac.  At the termination of this, our basic training will be over. Then there will be eight weeks more of technical training which will terminate my training and I will be able to bring down a car. But what comes afterward, I have not been able to determine. Possibly when we return next Thursday or Friday and I’m transferred to another Co. for additional training, I may be able to get a slant on the future. If I’m not transferred next weekend, I’ll have a chance to come home, and in connection with this event, do you suppose you could send me $5.00? This bivouac sort of took enough cash for cigarettes, shaving equipment, etc., to bring my $9.00 pay down to is some too low to buy a round trip ticket. Boy, we all certainly put out plenty for $.07 an hour. We make, at present, $.70 per day, which is really quite small when all items necessary during the first couple of weeks are purchased, mainly on the dribble plan, a little now and a little then. You have my permission to open any mail addressed to me, and do as you see fit. I think your judgment is reasonable.

Love,

Laddie

Tomorrow, a letter from Grandpa to his three sons away from home, one in Alaska and two in the Army, updating them on the happenings of their siblings. On Thursday, another letter from Lad and on Friday, I will finish out the week with another letter from Grandpa.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Guard Duty Puts Lad to Sleep – June 8, 1942

It has been less than a month since Lad was inducted into the Army and he is stationed at  the Ordnance Training Center at Aberdeen Proving Grounds  in Maryland for Basic Training.  

Alfred Peabody Guion (Lad) in Trumbull during a furlough from the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland

Aberdeen letter with Lad's normal script

                 Aberdeen letter with Lad’s normal script

Aberdeen letter when Lad is really tired

                Aberdeen letter when Lad is really tired

June 8, 1942

Dear Dad: –

Since we went on guard duty rather suddenly Sunday noon and did not get off until 6 AM this morning, I did not get a chance to write yesterday and if I can stay awake long enough tonight I’ll finish this letter.

During the week I learned that sometime this week, probably Thursday, I will have to go out on bivouac, so I won’t be able to get home this weekend. And again, the weekend of the 21st is unsettled. More information on that when I know.

I was a member of Relief # 1 so my guard duties began at noon yesterday. I walked from then until 2 PM in the broiling sun and my feet and muscles were really tired. Then, due to the fact that my back was not accustomed to carrying a rifle and a gas mask, my shoulders and back were really aching. The four hours I had off were not enough to overcome the effects. Then two more hours – 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. and another all too short 4 hour sleep. Then finally, again, 12:00 to 2:00 in the morning. By this time I was pretty well worn out. I got into bed and had just gotten to sleep when we had a call to arms and a simulation of actual war conditions. Therefore, I am pretty tired now, not having had much sleep and in a short time I have to fall out for retreat formation. By the time that I finish that and have had supper, I really don’t know if I will be able to finish this letter. In fact, I just fell asleep and that accounts for the crossed out words. I think that I had better stop now. Remember me to all please.

Love,

Laddie

APG - Aberdeen Proving Grounds insignia

This paper is printed by the Adams Paper Company of Holyoke, Mass., And I was wondering if the Mr. Adams I met a couple of times in your office was connected with that Company. It seems to me that he also came from Mass?

Well, Dad, it is getting close to 7:00 p.m. and since we have to get up so dog – gone early tomorrow, I think that I’d better retire. So until the next letter, adios.

My love to all – – – –

Lad

Starting tomorrow and for the rest of the week, I will post another letter from Lad, one from Grandpa, another one from Lad and on Friday, one last letter from Grandpa.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Lad – Just To Show You How Sore I Am – April 7, 1940

Alfred Peabody Guion

       Alfred Peabody Guion

Blog - Just To Show You How Sore I Am - April 14, 1940

 

R-70          April 7, 1940

Dear Lad:

Just to show you how sore I am I am starting in to write a double spaced letter to you, but before long I shall probably repent and make up a lot of excuses for you and change to single space again. No letter again this week, which coupled with the fact I am still not feeling so hot physically, is doubly disappointing.

Yesterday and today Dan has chopped the three dead Locust trees down by the cottage. Mrs. Burr has finally decided to move in and fix the place up so that it will be livable, putting the rent money into repairs for a while.

Ced has been spending what spare time he has last week looking into the relative merits of various makes of cars in the $1000 class. So far he has been favorably impressed with the Nash, Studebaker and Buick. What would be your preference?

Rusty (Heurlin, family friend and painter, who went to Alaska and became quite famous for his paintings of Alaskan life) suddenly appeared on the scene late last night. He has been staying a couple of weeks with Sydney (Bagshaw) while Brita (his wife and Rusty’s sister) and the baby have been visiting Mama in Wakefield.

Today has been a beautiful sunshiny day, a little cool when not in the sun and quite a breeze blowing. I walked around a bit in the afternoon which I hope did some good. It seems to be some sort of sinus trouble but is very slow clearing up. Usually that means some infection somewhere like teeth or tonsils, but as far as I know I have no trouble in either place so it must be something else because I have not felt energized or really myself for a number of months. Maybe with the sunny days of spring rapidly approaching I will absorb more vitamin D and get back some pep.

The company check for the regular amount arrived last week and has been deposited as usual.

There is practically no news I can think of that would interest you. Ex-mayor Behrens of the Behren’s Market died last week, the lady in the dry-cleaning shop has had some trouble with her eye and had to wear a black patch last week. She said a cinder got in her eye and scraped the eyeball.

Rusty wants to be remembered to you.

I do hope I’ll get a letter from you soon because as far as I have heard the draft for $50 I sent you may have been lost in transit. I have never received the photos nor have I heard whether you changed your plans about visiting Trinidad for your Easter vacation. The night of your birthday when we were all gathered around the supper table in the kitchen we all concentrated on sending you a thought message of goodwill and best wishes which I hope you were tuned in to receive.

I’ll turn in now and think of you and maybe cuss you a time or two for neglecting your old dad for three weeks at a stretch, ending up with the hope that Kurtz (the Post Office is located in Kurtz’s Grocery Store) will be holding a letter from you when I stop in there tomorrow morning. To be fair I don’t suppose the kind of letters I have been sending you lately rate as letters at all. The only thing you can say for them is that at least you have heard from us regularly.

As always,

Dad

Tomorrow and Sunday, I will post more of Elizabeth’s Adventure in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Dear Dad, Aunt Betty and Jean – Ced too – Serene Texas Life and Civil Service Exam – February 18, 1944

Marian Irwin Guion (Mrs. Lad)

Marian Irwin Guion.  (Mrs. Lad)

Wednesday –

Dear Dad, Aunt Betty and Jean – Ced, too – ‘cause I imagine he’s there also—

Life in Texas seems very serene these days. Not too much excitement, and Uncle Samuel has been keeping Lad so busy that he hasn’t had time to think, but he has gotten home every night so far, so I’m not complaining in the least – for that is much more than I expected. Don’t know how long this will continue, but just being near enough that I can see him occasionally is all I ask.

Valentine’s Day being our third (month) anniversary, we were going to celebrate, but Uncle Sammy stepped in and decided that Lad should work until 9 PM that evening. However, we did have dinner together, slightly rushed, I will admit. – but that in itself is an occasion! Just think of all the celebrating we are going to be able to do when this is all over!

Dad, we are sending you one of our wedding gifts that we would like to have you put in Lad’s safe deposit box. It is a $25 War Bond, and we don’t want to carry it around with us.

Marian’s Civil Service Notice of Rating, February, 1944

I took the Civil Service exam yesterday, so if I passed the test and they still need office workers, I may be working at the Red River Ordnance Depot. I should know the results the first of next week, so perhaps our next letter will tell whether or not I have a job. Being a lady of leisure has been very nice so far, but with no house to take care of, I’m hoping to be able to work at least part of the time, so that I’ll have something to keep me busy during the day.

I’m going to wait to mail this letter, and also one to Dan, in case Lad gets home early enough to add a few lines to them. He’s had to work every night this week, so far, so I’m not sure whether he will even get home – needless to say – I hope so – .

Love to all

Marian

2/18/44

P.S.   Sorry, Dad, but I better get this in the mail before you think a Texas tornado has done away with the Lad Guions! Received your letter yesterday – we were glad to hear that Ced has been deferred and are waiting in hopes that we will be able to see him before he returns to Alaska. If he left immediately, I guess he couldn’t stop off in Texas, for he would have been here by now, but if he couldn’t get a reservation until later this week, perhaps we will see him after all. Needless to say, we certainly hope so!

Lad has been working so hard he hasn’t had time to think, let alone write letters! Maybe next time – and that roast beef you mentioned had us practically drooling! How we would have loved to be there! In fact we got so hungry that we had a late evening snack. The best Texas had to offer was crackers spread with peanut butter and one lone candy bar! A far cry from delicious roast beef!

Love —

Marian

Tomorrow and Friday, a letter from Grandpa to the Ex-Trumbullites (and Marian) mentioning Ced’s  travel plans up until he got on the train and quick updates on the rest of the family.

Judy Guion.

Army Life – Dear Dad and Assembled Members of the Guion Family – Moving Without a Car – January 30, 1944

????????????????????????????????????????

Marian (Irwin) Guion

1416 Stratford Ave.

South Pasadena, Calif.

Sunday

Dear Dad and assembled members of the Guion family,

I’m afraid that I’ve neglected you this past week – not in my thoughts, however – tho’ very definitely in regards to letter writing.

This business of packing sort of has me stumped. Here to fore,  Mother has always been on hand to forward anything I happened to forget, or take care of the many things I didn’t know what to do with. This time, however, I have to figure it out by myself – and not being able to move in a car is another handicap. Now I have to wrap everything or put it in a box or suitcase instead of just throwing it in the back of the car! It’s been so long since I’ve tried to move without a car that I don’t know how to act.

We were so sorry to hear about Ced. It must be very nice to have him home for a longer time than you expected, but I wish it were under more favorable circumstances. I sincerely hope that everything will work out just the way he wishes.

What a very interesting person Lad’s Grandmother must have been. I wish that I could have met her. Your lives have been just that much richer, haven’t they, by having her with you for as long as she was here.

I also received a very interesting letter from Aunt Elsie last week. She spoke of having been to California some years ago and having liked it very much. I’m looking forward to meeting her, and I hope it will be very soon.

Thank you Aunt Betty for your letter – I am glad the sweater meets with your approval, and Lad is the one who deserves the credit for the right size.

I’m surprised that I can get anything done this week. I’m so excited about finally being able to join Lad that I’m practically in a daze! Did I tell you that he has found a place for us to stay? Not too fancy, but that makes absolutely no difference.

With love to everyone,

Marian

P.S. You see, I took your suggestion about the green ink, Dad. I like it very much.

M

I believe this writing paper was a Christmas gift from Lad to Marian, but Grandpa actually printed it from Lad’s design suggestion.

Tomorrow another letter from Grandpa and on Friday, another one from Marian with a note from Lad. Judy Guion

Army Life – Lad’s First Letter Home (2) – Training Continues – May 17, 1942

Lad’s first letter home to his father and the rest of the family continues with Lad’s detailed training activities at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland, where he is part of an Ordnance Battalion.

Lad - 1943

Alfred Peabody Guion (Lad)

Wed.

Due to the issue of rifles last night, I did not have time to complete this letter. And it looks as though I may not have time to finish it tonight. We are to have a lecture at 8 PM and that is only a short time distant. If anyone tells you that we are busy, just let it pass as an understatement. Boy, from 5:45 until 9:00, with the exception of about 30 minutes at noon and 1½ hours in the evening, we do not have time to even think for ourselves. To say nothing of heeding “Mother Nature”.

May 23

I was right. I could not finish it, and then, since there was to be an inspection today, we spent all free time yesterday thoroughly cleaning the barracks. Outside and in. Then today for a diet we had drilling all morning, an inspection/review early in the afternoon, a rigid inspection later in the barracks, and then about 40 of us were marched a couple of miles to the infirmary, given two injections, and marched back again. Right now my right arm is so stiff that I have to use only my fingers and wrist to write. And incidentally, I don’t feel too hot. Oh! Yes. – Yesterday we were given our first rifle practice on an indoor range. I didn’t do too bad, but nowhere nearly as well as Dan.

From things that have been said at various places and by various people who should know. – Ordnance work and the Ordnance Department of the US Army rates second to none. Not even the Engineering Corps. Apparently, eight men out of 1000 get far enough to make the necessary qualifications for this department, and then, to make things even better, of those picked men, two out of 1000 get a chance to qualify for an Instructor’s rating and the Officer’s Training Course. I am among the latter few, and that really makes me feel good. I just hope that I can live up to the honor when my chance comes. I believe that if things go for me as they have been planned at present, I will be stationed here at Aberdeen Proving Grounds  (A.P.G.) (NOTE: Lad’s initials – Alfred Peabody Guion) for six months or even for the duration. In any case, Ordnance men are not trained to fight except as a means of self-protection, and the main idea, roughly, is to supply the men on the lines with ammunition, and equipment for fighting. We are the men behind the men on the front. Apparently, I have been picked to act as an instructor in automotive repair and maintenance. Well, so much for Army Life, here. I received your letter O.K., but I’m afraid that it will not be as easy as you seem to think to write regularly for a few weeks anyway. I am busier than the proverbial bee. Time out.

Sunday –

Those injections plus a cold got me. I quit, planning to take a short rest, but the first thing I knew it was just 9 PM and the corporal was saying one minute before lights out, so I didn’t have time to write more.

Breakfast on Sundays is at 7:00 and then I spent the rest of the morning washing clothes and cleaning my equipment in general. Then, immediately after lunch we fell out with rifles and had an inspection of arms. Then, following this, we went on a hike of about 5 or 6 miles, with cartridge belt, first aid kit and leggins. We returned in time for supper and then – here I am.

Quarantine will be up one week from tomorrow night. Then, if I am lucky, I will be able to get a pass for the weekend.

However, in the meantime, I would appreciate very much your sending me 10 clothes hangers. Two of them, steel. It is impossible to get hangers here.

I heard from Babe (Cecelia Mullins, the girl he’s been dating back home) Sat. but have not received any other mail. And speaking of mail, can you give me Dan’s address?

APG - Aberdeen Proving Grounds insignia

How do you like the Ordnance Emblem? The department colors are yellow and crimson. The insignia is a flaming bomb.

In order to shorten the address you may use the abbreviations as shown below: – remember me to everyone and my love to Aunt Betty.

Pvt. ______(me)____

Co B – 1st Bn. – O.R.T.C.

Aberdeen Proving Grounds

Md.

Love —–

Lad

Tomorrow, another letter from Grandpa to his sons away from home.  

Judy Guion 

Army Life – Lad’s First Letter Home (1) – Trumbull, Connecticut, to Ayer, Massachusetts, to Aberdeen, Maryland – May 18, 1942

This is the first page of 11, a long letter to Grandpa telling him of all of his adventures after leaving Grandpa at the Railroad Station in Shelton/Derby, CT, on May 14, 1942.

APG - First letter to Grandpa from Aberdeen Proving Grounds - May 18, 1942

Pvt. A.P. Guion

Co. B 14 Bn ORTC

Aberdeen Proving Ground

Md.

May 18, 1942

Dear Dad: –

We left Derby on time and stopped at Ansonia. Here a second car was filled, and after a stop at Waterbury the third car was filled and our next stop was Hartford. Here we detrained at a few minutes before nine and walked about 1 ½ blocks to the Induction Center. There were so many of us that the complete inspection was not over until 2:45. The actual inspection per person was not more than 30 or 35 min., if that much. At 3 PM the 88 who had passed the examinations out of 169, were put into a separate car and in a few minutes a train coupled onto the car and we were off. The train stopped nowhere until it got to Worchester, Mass. Here a switch engine hooked onto our car and while the train went on, we were switched back and forth, and ended up on the track going in the opposite direction. Here another train picked us up and again we were off. Our next stop was in Ayer, Mass., where there is no platform of any kind. The tracks run through the backyard of Camp Devens. Here, with our baggage, we were again given a short march and after a little discussion concerning behavior in the camp we were issued raincoats and a barracks bag, another hike to Co. B, 1st Bn., and we were issued blankets. Incidentally, we detrained at Fort Devens at 5:40, 30 minutes ahead of schedule. Then came supper and bed making instructions and we were more than glad to turn in at 9:00.

Friday we rose at 5:45 A.M., policed the barracks and fell out for breakfast. Immediately after that we were taken to Q.M.C. and issued our uniforms. What a system. It takes about four or five minutes from the time you start, stark naked, til you emerge at the other end very well fitted from the skin out, and in six complete uniforms with two complete changes of everything else. Then came an Aptitude test – lunch – and a private interview. Back to the theater to be shown a film on the evil side of sex, a couple of short welcome speeches – supper – a couple of fallout calls to advise some of the men that they were leaving early Sat. morning and then to bed.

Sat – up at 5:45 and out for reveille where 10 fellows and myself were told we would be ready to leave at 7:15. A rush to breakfast, again to the medical section for injections and a vaccination, back again for clothes and we fell out at 7:21 for the trip to wherever it was. We were marched out to the same lot at which we detrained when we first arrived and here we were told to wait for further orders. We waited until 8:30 and then were assembled and marched back to the road again, a distance of a couple of hundred yards and were put onto a truck. By truck we were taken a few miles to Fitchburg where we again waited and at 9:21 a train pulled in. At the rear was a special car and we were loaded into this. By now we numbered 44. A sergeant was in charge. He would give us no information as to where we were going, not even if it were a long trip. However with spirits undaunted, we had a good time. At Greenfield, Mass., we were shunted again and changed direction of travel from west to south. Our next stop was at Springfield where we were put onto a siding and taken into the station for lunch. After lunch we boarded the car again and in a couple of minutes another train backed up and again we were off. We stopped at Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, Stamford and Penn Station. We were ordered not to mail anything or make phone calls until we arrived at our destination, so I could not write anything to you. A half hour stop in Penn. Station, while a Penn. Engine was put on in place of the New Haven, during which time we ate a box lunch, and then began a real ride. On the New Haven road we had made good time, and only a few stops, but the track was quite rough and I don’t think we traveled better than 45 or 50 M.P.H. The first stop on the new leg was at Newark and then began a fast non-stop trip. The only times we slowed down below 75 M.P.H. (according to my figuring – the mile posts were going by every 44 or 45 seconds) was when we switched from the local track to the express or vice versa. On this trip we passed two freight trains, two locals and one express. All of them moving. It took about 2 ½ or 3 miles to pass the express, but we did it. Our next stop was Philadelphia, then Wilmington and then Aberdeen. Here, to our surprise, we all got off and were taken by truck, in the rain, to our present location (see the letterhead). We were issued blankets, assigned to barracks and were glad to go to bed even though it was only 9:30.

Sunday we had nothing to do, and also being in quarantine for a two-week period, we could do nothing. I acquainted myself as well as I could with in our limited grounds, about 2000 x 1000 feet, and made a few purchases at the PX (Camp store – Post Exchange) which we are lucky enough to have within grounds and again retired.

Monday began our training and was spent in learning marching fundamentals.

Today, Tuesday, we heard from a few of the Big Shots on the duties of the Ordnance Dept., and this afternoon, more drilling. Just now we are having an inspection of all equipment issued to us. And so will end today. And, believe me, we are all glad to hit the hay at 9:00 P.M. when the lights go out.

Tomorrow, I’ll post the rest of this letter from Lad to his Dad, my Grandpa, all about his first experiences in and with the Army after his induction. Friday, another letter from Grandpa to his three sons away from home: Ced in Anchorage, Alaska, working as an airplane mechanic; Dan, being trained as an Army surveyor in Pennsylvania and Lad, who has just been inducted and is at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Aberdeen, Maryland.

Judy Hardy