Peabodys and Duryees – Our Branch of the Family Tree (2) – December 6, 1939

This is the final section of the Duryee Family Tree with additions hand-written by Aunt Betty Duryee.

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Joseph Woodward Duryee fathered five daughters, Mary, Ella (my great-grandmother),  Florence, Lillian and Lizzie (who preferred Betty, Aunt Betty Duryee). 

 

Untitled-3 6

fr: Ella Duryee Guion, Elsie Guion; back: Alfred Duryee Guion, Aunt Mary and Aunt Lillian (Aunt Betty Duryee was probably taking the picture).

You can see Alfred that your genealogy is one of the best, and that you come from a long line of ancestors you can well be proud of. You may have a certain responsibility to live up to, but never forget that it is just a background after all, and that it is the character of the man himself, his life and achievements that really matters in his generation. 

Tomorrow and Sunday, I will continue pictures of the Trumbull House and The End of an Era. 

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Our Branch of the Family Tree (1) – December 6, 1939

This document was created by Aunt Betty Duryee from (possibly) her own research or at least papers belonging to her family.

 

Peabodys and Duryees - Our Branch of the Family Tree (1) - December 6, 1939

Tomorrow, I will be posting the last page of the documents Aunt Betty Duryee sent to Lad while he was working in Venezuela in 1939.

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – History of the Duryee Family – A Note From Aunt Betty Duryee – December 6, 1939

This is a re-post of last week’s letter to Lad from Aunt Betty which included  The History of our Family. I thought I might remind you of the sequence of events leading up to Aunt Betty sending this information to Lad.

Dec. 6, 1939

Dear Alfred,

It occurred to me while I was writing the letter I sent to you on Monday that perhaps you would like a copy of the History of the Duryee Family.

I hunted up my papers and had a copy typewritten.

You will see it was as I said that David (I don’t know who this is but my guess is that he was someone Lad met in Venezuela named David Duryee. Lad may have written to Aunt Betty to see if she know whether they were related.) may be descended from the ancestor mentioned in the paper and I think he also will be interested.  The crest is really not complete, it should have underneath a scroll with the motto (Future Promise) but in French, not English.  But I do not have the complete copy here.

Both on your Grandfather Duryee’s and Guion’s side you have a fine lineage.

Lots of love to you and my best regards to David.

Aunt Betty

The beginning of this history has two pages of illustrious ancestors from France, Holland and Scotland. I am not going to post this information but tomorrow and Friday, I will post  Our branch of the Family Tree, prepared By Aunt Betty Duryee, beginning with our original ancestor,  Joost Durie (Duryer, Duryea or Duryee). He was a French Huguenot who emigrated from Manheim and settled in New Utrecht, Long Island and then moved to Bushwick Long Island.

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Holiday Greetings From Grandmother Peabody – December 4, 1939

Grandma Peabody

Grandmother Peabody (Anna Charlotta (Westlin) Peabody, Mrs. Kemper Peabody). This picture was taken in 1914 shortly after my Dad, Alfred Peabody Guion, was born.

New Rochelle, N.Y.

December 4, 1939

Dear Laddie,

I have waited a very long time in writing and thanking you for your dear and welcome letter. It’s so long ago maybe you have even forgotten you wrote to me!

Your letter was one of the most interesting I have ever had, and all the family enjoyed it so much. You know I have been very sick, having had two major operations. The second operation was to complete the first. The only out-of-doors I have had since July 16th are four rides in the ambulance between the hospital and our apartment. But I think that in another two or three weeks I may be able to take a real auto ride.

Well, how do you feel about being an uncle? I haven’t heard from Elizabeth since I wrote congratulations to them. I hope she and the Raymonds are all fine.

You mention Biss’s marriage. Laddie, she could have done an awful lot worse. As I saw him, he seemed like a really nice fellow, and they certainly seemed very happy. They seemed really congenial, and all we Peabodys like him very much.

Ted and Helen (Peabody) Human) have been staying with us (Dorothy and myself) for some time. Of course you know, Anne (Peabody) Stanley and her children), Gweneth and Donald went to Staunton, Virginia, to make their home for a while. We are hoping they will spend Christmas with us.

Sometime ago I received a letter from Cedric saying they wanted to make us a visit one Sunday. Then he called up and said he had to work that Sunday. We were disappointed not to see them.

My letter is pretty tame compared with yours but there is really so little to write about. Everything is tame here.

I hope this letter will reach you by Christmas and that your Christmas may be very happy. I know we shall be thinking about you. I don’t dare to say I would like to hear from you again.

My love and best wishes,

Grandmother Peabody

Tomorrow, a letter from a classmate of Lad’s, wondering about job opportunities in Venezuela. On Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, a letter from Aunt Betty (Duryee) with a copy of “The History of the Duryee Family” enclosed.

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Dear Alfred – Information About Ancestors and Thanksgiving in Trumbull – December 3, 1939

This is a letter from Aunt Betty Duryee, Grandpa’s Mother’s sister. She is writing on stationary from the Gift Shop at Grand Central Station where she works. Grandpa’s sister, Elsie Duryee works there also.

ADG - Jean Guion, Aunt Betty and Grandpa outside in winter, Ja. 27, 1945 (2) Aunt Betty only

Aunt Betty Duryee in Trumbull

Dec. 3, 1939

Dear Alfred

Oh, Boy! Was I glad to get a letter from you with its gay trimmings of red, white and blue stripes all around the edge of the envelope, it made me feel all kinds of warm inside.

Before I go on I must tell you that my fountain pen does not like me one single bit and has told me in no uncertain terms that it won’t write for me.  It has been acting up for some time and even after taking it to the doctor and having it’s insides all straightened out it still will not behave.  I think perhaps it wants some of the fine wine your father gave me last Christmas and that I keep in my closet instead of the good ink I insist on filling it’s little tummy with.  However my pencil keeps reminding me that it never has to drink anything, and is always ready, even if not in the brightest form of good society, so please excuse it.

I’m glad you were interested in the article on Venezuela, I thought you might be.

David Duryee must be in some way related to the family although I have no record of that name in my papers, of the Duryee family, but that does not mean much because there are many branches on our family tree.  The name originally, way back in the 1600’s was spelled Durie.  How and where the y was added I do not know, but the proper way to spell the name is Duryee with the accent over the last (e) making the French pronunciation, Duryea.

We came from the Holland Dutch as well as the French, you see our ancestors were French Huguenots (Protestants of the 16th and 17th centuries) and were obliged, after the revocation (1685) of the Edict of Nantes, to flee to Holland seeking refuge.

You must certainly have wanted a bath to go in the water with all your clothes on, but I bet it felt good anyway.  Your description of water and more and sleeping in the wide open spaces was surely a grand experience..

On Wednesday the 29th of Nov. I went on the train to Trumbull to spend Thanksgiving which in Connecticut was observed on the 30th.  Elsie (Duryee) did not expect to go but changed her mind and arrived on the evening of the 29th.  Thanksgiving day was fine and we had a lovely day.  Your father cooked the dinner and believe me he is some good cook.  The only fly in the ointment was your absence from the family circle.  All were home, Dan, Cedric, Richard, David.  Elizabeth and baby and Raymond (Zabel) having dinner in their house.  The baby is a good-sized baby but almost too small to say much about how he looks and so forth, he is very good however.

Thanksgiving afternoon we all took a drive and went up to the woods for evergreens for Elsie to use as decorations in the shop.  I wish it were possible for you to be with us all at Christmas time, but even if we are apart, we are all thinking of you and loving you all the more.

I forgot to tell you that at the dinner table when we were all together your father read your letter and showed us the generous check you sent so that we all might have a good Christmas from you.  It was lovely of you Alfred and I, for one, appreciate it more than I can say.  I wish there was some way for me to send you something but Dan and Dad say that the duty is so much that it is better not to send anything, but I am going to see if I can’t remember you in some way even if only through the mail.

Love and lots of it, from Aunt Betty

Trumbull – Dear Santa Claus (4) – A Letter From Dan About an Adventure – December 3, 1939

This letter from Dan to his older brother is typed on the back of Grandpa’s 3-page letter.

DBG - Dan (cropped) fron Ced, Dan and car - 1941

Daniel Beck Guion

ye El pueblito de Trumbull

Dec. 3

Que tal. chico,

Tenga una amiga en Valencia qui  escribe a mi de quando en quando. En la ultima carta yo le dije a me ella que si usted _ra a Valencia se puede visitarla. Ella se llama Carol Ravell. Su direccion esta Auto Mundial, Valencia. Es muy amiga mia. Le encontre a ella en el vapor Santa Paula en Julio.

 On Thanksgiving Day, while nuestro padre busied himself en la cochina, Ced, Barbie (Plumb, Dan’s girlfriend), Jean (Mortensen, Dick’s girlfriend), Don Whitney y yo set out in your Packard for Greenfield Hill.Every Thanksgiving Day the Fairfield Country Hounds dress up in their round just bowlers and mount their most stalwart steeds for a bit of tally-ho before dinner. I have enclosed some actual photographs of the affair clipped from the Sunday Post.

They started from the Green, led by the hounds who, I am told, were pursuing a real fox.  We dashed from road to road in a perpetual attempt to intercept the hunt as it wandered from hill to veil in pursuit of the elusive animal.  It was quite a colorful affair.  All the officials were in red coats.  The rest wore Derby hats, held on by black silk ribbons clipped to the back of the brim.

In an excess of spirit we set off on a rough dirt road and were rather surprised when the front spring (not the one which I had noticed earlier!) was completely severed.  We could go forward, but not in reverse.  We parked in the road while we made a last attempt to locate the horseman before starting for home.  I became conscious of a desire to perform a natural process (liquid), and, to avoid the embarrassment of pardoning myself from the two gals present, I wandered absently I head on the old dirt road as if I were looking for the horses ….. A sort of (“see a man about a horse”) proposition with more truth than usual.  As my crank-case drained I became aware of a pattering of pause approaching along the road, but I could not see until it flashed interview from behind the convenient privet hedge that I was (and I swear this is the truth, so help me, and I have witnesses) the Fox! it was going like the much-expressed hammers of hell, only more so.  It glanced neither to the right or left.  There was no sign of pursuit, but that Fox was laying down its feet in the most purposeful manner possible, and it was heading straight toward the Packard! 

I started running after it, yelling to the rest of the gang who were standing near the car, “Here comes the Fox! Here comes the Fox!”, and just before Reynard reached the car, he caught sight of them, for he swerved suddenly, cleared the low stone wall which bordered the road in a single bound, then sped across the field out of sight.

Two Horsemen, cantering slowly along the road from the direction from which the fox had come, evidently on their way home from the hunt, passed us, and I said, “We have a broken spring, and we just saw the fox go by!”

“Oh, yea?” one of the man replied, and I suddenly realized that my story might receive the same treatment everywhere.  But all the gang saw clearly that it was a genuine fox, and, although he did not tarry (the fox, I mean) long enough to tell us whether or not he was THE fox, or merely a casual chicken killer from the surrounding countryside, we were satisfied that, since we had come to see a Fox-Hunt, we had not come in vain.

The spring replacement cost $17.49.

                                                                            Bueno, pues,

                                                                                            Dan

Tomorrow I will be posting a letter from Aunt Betty Duryee, with some information regarding the Duryee ancestors and her account of Thanksgiving.

Judy Guion

 

 

Trumbull – Dear Members of the Clan Guion (1) – Dick and Jean Are Home – October 7, 1945

 

APG - 1947 Christmas - Dick and Jean

Dick and Jean Guion (taken on Christmas Day, 1947)

Trumbull, Conn., October 7, 1945

Dear Members of the Clan Guion:

Again events this week have combined to cut down my correspondence time, but late as it is now, I must take time to at least hit the high spots and some of said spots have considerable altitude.

First, Dick and Jean are home. Yes sir, the clan is beginning to gather. The first inkling I had was a telegram the first part of the week from Dick announcing they were in Miami, ending with the cheering words, “See you soon.”, And as good as his word, he and Jean dropped into the office Friday in a surprise visit. He looks well, has a miniature mustache and has not put on any weight, and outside of a cold, is the same old Dick. Jean says she has put on a little weight but it is not noticeable. Gosh, but it’s good to have two boys home at once with their wives, but I, apparently, cannot be satisfied – – all I need now is Dan and Paulette, Ced and Dave, and then I will admit to a maximum of satisfaction.

The same day Dick and Jean arrived, Britta (Huerlin Bagshaw) , Anna (Huerlin) and young Peter Bagshaw visited us and stayed to supper. Biss, Zeke and the two boys also came over for supper so we put three leaves in the table and it began to look like old times again. Later, we showed pictures, movies and stills, of Alaska, Venezuela, etc. I got Anna aside, found out she was willing to sell the Island, so, as a novel Christmas present to you children, I decided to buy it for you all. This will practically clean me out of cash put aside for Christmas gifts, and then some, but I figured it would be worth it to you all. I will have something more to say on the thing a little later.

Martin and Flor Williams visiting Trumbull

APG - Lad with Flor and Martin Williams in Trumbull

Lad, Flor and Martin Williams at the Trumbull House.

APG - Flor Williams with snake - Anaco - 1945

Flor Williams (second from the right) with others in Venezuela, holding the skin of an Anaconda,.

Then yesterday, the date of Lad’s meeting, planned five years ago in Venezuela, came around and he and Marian went down for their reunion with the Venezuelan crowd. They stayed overnight in New York and today brought Mr. and Mrs. Williams back with them, and again we showed movies of Venezuela, Alaska, etc. Jack Fillman and his wife, and Red (Sirene) and his fiancée, dropped in to see Dick and Marian and later my cousin Dud (Dudley Duryee) and wife from Brooklyn drove up to see us and stayed to supper and the movies. Incidentally Dan, Martin Williams asked me to be remembered to you when he saw that I was writing a letter to you. They are staying overnight, so I have just left the party to write this note to you all.

No letters this week from Ced or Dan, but Dave wrote a short note commenting on some of my previous letters. He says: “Rumor has it that GHQ will be moving out sometime in October, but doesn’t know whether or not he will go along. He may stay in Manila or go to Korea or possibly to Yokohama.

Now let’s get back to the Island proposition, which, I admit, has got me all excited. Ever since your mother and I first went up there with Rusty, landing late one night and sleeping out on the island, which it was too dark to see until next morning, I have been hoping that someday events would work around so that we could own the Island and perhaps build a little cabin on it where we could spend summer vacations. And at last this dream has materialized. I am attaching a sort of snap shot of my thoughts on the subject and invite you to do the same, so that from the combination of thoughts on the subject, we ought to arrive at some final solution fairly acceptable to all. Therefore I will close this brief letter and proceed to the Island subject.

DAD

Tomorrow, Thursday and Friday, Grandpa’s “Random thoughts on our Future camp.”

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Fugitives (1) – A Typical Domestic Scene – December 3, 1944

MIG - Marian and Jean bringing in Christmas Tree - 1944

Marian (Irwin) Guion (Mrs. Lad) and Jean (Mortensen) Guion (Mrs. Dick), enjoying the winter weather, 1944

Trumbull, Conn., December 3, 1944

Dear Fugitives:

Having run away from home, leaving your wives – – you who have them – – to form the nucleus of your father’s harem, it devolves upon me as the patriarch of the family to set down for posterity an account of the momentous happenings at home, hoping the while that you will soon see the error of your ways and return home to feast upon the fatted calf (no reference to ladies present) which your father and O.P.A. jointly hope to supply.

And speaking of meals, I must record a momentous occasion at home here – – the inauguration of a new chefess (Dan will supply the proper French feminine word) for the Sunday cuisine in the Guion ménage – – no less a person then Marian, the wife of Alfred the Absent,  who, in her own charming manner, volunteered for the task and in her own inimitable way, prepared a very pleasing and satisfying Sunday dinner, thus releasing the erstwhile cook for such household chores as fitting boards to take the place of marble slabs (sounds like a morgue) on the Walnut Bureau – – the one Ced spent so many hours scraping the paint off of (one should never use a preposition at the end of a sentence); re-hanging the dinner gong in the dining room which Butch and Marty finally succeeded in pulling off the wall; turning off the water from the laundry tubs; filling up the small round hole in the kitchen floor which you boys used to spit tobacco juice down; replacing glass in storm windows; applying a priming coat of paint to new storm doors, and other little odds and ends. Some day this week, I expect Karl Laufer to come over to fix the broken eave on the apartment roof caused by the falling tree and other jobs.

If you have by this time surmised from the above that I am having difficulty in finding some entertaining items of news to record, you will have come close to the truth. Nevertheless, let me pursue my wayward course and set down a typical domestic scene. We are all seated around the kitchen table. Outside it is dusk. I, with my back to the dining room door in my accustomed place, I’m trying to indite my weekly news sheet. At the other end of the table, Jean is busily engaged in knitting a pair of brown socks or something. Aunt Betty, on my left, has just finished preparing Christmas cards to be sent to you boys. At my right, Marian, early imbued with the Christmas wrapping spirit, with numerous boxes and packages of colored ribbon, stickers, stars and smelly paste, is industriously preparing attractive packages to go to relatives in sunny California. Smoky, in the laundry, is pushing his food bowl around the floor in a vain effort to lap the last particle of dog food from the meal his Aunt Betty has so lovingly prepared for him. And that seems to complete the status of affairs at the moment.     Elizabeth and Zeke dropped in for a few moments this afternoon. They report the children are recovering from their tonsil operation in fairly good shape. Elizabeth, I am sorry to say, does not take very good care of her own health and is not feeling too well. Aunt Betty keeps remarkably well and keeps going in great style. Friday she went down to Bridgeport and spent the day going the round of the stores for Christmas shopping and coming home alone on the bus. Marian has been helping all week at the office – – and I really mean helping. She has mastered the graphotype in good style and, as a consequence, a number of rush jobs, which were worrying me, were turned out on time, and correctly. Ethel (Bushy) Wayne, Mrs. Carl) has just reported a phone message from Carl who is in New York and will be home tomorrow or Tuesday. This means he will probably be home for the holidays.

The only “Army” mail this week is from Dave (at Camp Crowder, Missouri, for training beyond Basic), as follows: “At long last I’m finally back to soldiering again. Ever since the beginning of Sept., when I came back from the field, I’ve been leading quite an easy life. But starting yesterday we’re doing team training. From seven A.M. to 7 P.M. I’m on the go. It makes a long day six days a week. But the reason for it, they say, is that this unit is “hot”. Of course those of us on the DD team that used to be, have heard that story before. This letter is being written in school, so you can see I don’t have much time. I can’t promise you too good mail service in the future. Our team training is supposed to go from now until the first week in January – – the last two weeks of training (Christmas and New Year’s), being spent out in the field. I haven’t spoken to the Captain yet but I’m very sure I won’t be able to get a furlough until Team Training is over in January. If we’re as hot as we’re supposed to be, we’ll leave sometime in February or March. Well, I haven’t said much but I’d better quit before I get caught.”

A letter from Larry  (Peabody) says one of the high spots in the year for them was the visit of Lad and Marian. “We thought she was swell – – and was Alan proud of his cousin Lad! Trailed him like a shadow. Our love to Aunt Betty, Biss, and all our nephews and our wives and their cousins and our aunts in Trumbull and also to our brother in law.” Marion  writes: “We were so happy to meet Marian and so pleased that she and Lad took the time to stop off here on their return to California. Marian is grand – – 100% – – and it doesn’t take more than two minutes to arrive at that conclusion. Lad is a fine boy, a lucky boy and a deserving boy. (Speaking of Marian, I wasn’t prejudiced by the fact that she had been a schoolteacher and that she spelled her name ian either!!) You probably know that Dorothy (Peabody) was out here again for about 10 days the end of August. It was so nice to have her. We wish so much that more of our “Eastern” relatives could come. My mother is in Ohio now until after Christmas. She is real well and had her 71st birthday last week. We have had a very heart-breaking summer tho. Bill, my older brother, had a cerebral hemorrhage just before Memorial Day and is still in a very pathetic condition. He became irrational and had to be removed to a mental hospital, where he still is, tho somewhat improved. Alan is fine – – in third grade this year. Larry has a “chair” or whatever you call it, in the Masonic Lodge and is busy. We really think of you all, uncle, much oftener than you hear from us. Am I glad that you and Aunt Betty have Jean and Marian with you. Our best to you all for a very pleasant Christmas. Send our love to all the boys when you write them next.”

Tomorrow I’ll post the conclusion of this letter and finish out the week with another of grandpa’s long letters to T/3, T/4, T/5, Sgt. And Chief Ski Instructor.

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Dear Alfred – A Letter From Aunt Betty Duryee – December 3, 1939

This week’s final post is a letter from Aunt Betty Duryee, Grandpa’s Mother’s (Ella (Duryee) Guion) sister, who moved in with Grandpa, his mother and sister, along with two other sisters, after his father died when he was 15 years old and it was necessary to sell the Lincoln Avenue house and move into something smaller.

ADG - Jean Guion, Aunt Betty and Grandpa outside in winter, Ja. 27, 1945 (2) Aunt Betty only

Aunt Betty Duryee

December 3, 1939

Dear Alfred,

Oh, boy! Was I glad to get a letter from you with its gay trimmings of red, white and blue stripes all around the edge of the envelope, it made me feel all kind of warm inside.

Before I go on I must tell you that my fountain pen does not like me one single bit and has told me in no uncertain terms that it won’t write for me. It has been ”acting up” for some time and even after taking it to the doctor and having it’s insides all straightened out, it still will not behave. I think perhaps it wants some of the port wine your father gave me last Christmas and it knows that I keep it in my closet instead of the good ink I insist on filling its little tummy with. However, my pencil keeps reminding me that it never has to drink anything, and is always ready, even if not in the brightest form of good society, so please excuse it.

I am glad you are interested in the article on Venezuela, I thought you might be.

David Duryee must be in one way related to the family, although I have no record of that name in my papers of the Duryee family, but that does not mean much because there are many branches on the family tree.

The name originally, way back in the 1600s, was spelled Durie. How and when the “y” was added I do not know but the proper way to spell the name is Duryee with the accent on the last “e” making the French pronunciation, Duryea.

We come from the Holland Dutch as well as the French. You see our ancestors were French Huguenots (Protestants of the 16th & 17th centuries) and were obliged, after the revocation (1685) of the Edict of Nantes, to flee to Holland seeking refuge.

You must certainly have wanted a bath to go in the water with all your clothes on, but I bet it felt good anyway. Your description of water and moon and sleeping in the wide open space was surely a grand experience.

On Wednesday, 29 November, I took the train to Trumbull to spend Thanksgiving, which in Connecticut was observed on the 30th. Elsie did not expect to go but changed her mind and arrived on the evening of the 29th. Thanksgiving Day was fine and we had a lovely day. Your father cooked the dinner and believe me, he is some good cook. The only fly in the ointment was your absence from the family circle. All were home – Dan, Cedric, Richard, David. Elizabeth and baby and Raymond, having dinner in their part of the house (Biss, her husband Raymond (known to family and friends as Zeke) and baby Raymond were living at this point in the small apartment). The baby is a good-sized baby but almost too small to say much about here, he laughs and so forth, he is very good however.

Thanksgiving afternoon we all took a drive and went up to the woods for evergreens for Elsie to use as decorations in the shop (Elsie May Guion, Grandpa’s sister, has a gift shop in Grand Central Station). I wish it were possible for you to be with us all at Christmas time, but even if we are apart, we are all thinking of you and loving you all the more.

I forgot to tell you that at the dinner table when we were all together, your father read your letter and showed us the generous check you sent so that we all might have a good Christmas from you. It was lovely of you Alfred, and we appreciate it more than I can say. I wish there was some way for me to send you everything but Dan and Dad say that duty is so much that it is better not to send anything, but I am going to see if I can’t remember you in some way, even if only through the mail.

Love and lots of it from,

Aunt Betty

Tomorrow and Sunday, I will continue with posts from The End of an Era.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Sons: (and daughters Jean and Paulette) (1) – News From Jean – September 23, 1945

Trumbull, Conn., September 23, 1945

Dear Sons:      (and daughters Jean and Paulette)

Well, things have been running along here in their accustomed way. More of the boys are coming home with H.D.’s. Barbara (Plumb), I understand, has already sailed for home. Rationing is easing a bit. Gas, meat, canned goods, fuel are all easier. A few civilian goods long off the market are beginning to appear, but strikes are mentioned more and more frequently in the daily papers – – labor demanding higher wages which of course will inadvertently result in a raise in prices and thus the vicious spiral starts again, inflation in the offing.

Lad and Marian (Irwin) Guion

Lad’s 30-day furlough is practically up. He and Marian start out in the car tomorrow for Devens (Ft. Devens, Massachusetts), the idea being that if his leave is extended, as one newspaper report said was going to be done on the authority of Gen. Henry, then perhaps they can drive back together. On the other hand, if Lad has to go back from there to Aberdeen, as was the original intention, then Marian will drive back alone and we will then wait to hear from Lad as to what the Army’s future plans are for him. Personally, I do not expect they will send him to the Pacific area where the rest of his outfit is now and where he would be, if he had not gone to Dan’s wedding and thereby “missed the boat”. This week they toured New England, visiting the old Lake Winnipesaukee island of fond memories. No one is inhabiting it now but the cottage on the shore has been rebuilt. They visited Ingrid and Anna (Huerlin, Rusty Huerlin’s sisters) in Melrose and saw Lars Erik. They then toured through the White Mountains (Mt. Washington, the Notches, etc.), and Sunday reached St. Albans where they found Larry, Marian and Alan (Larry Peabody, Grandma Arla’s brother, and his wife and son) on a visit, then to Colchester and Burlington (unable to locate Fred) (Stanley, husband or ex-husband of Anne (Peabody) Stanley, Grandma Arla’s younger sister), crossed Champlain on the ferry (remember the big pig?), Ausable Chasm, Saratoga (which they reached too late to look up the Osbournes) and home. Last night they had a final blowout in New York and right now Marian is doing some ironing and Lad is wrapping up packages to send to Dan with some clothes that Paulette needs and which I shall try to get off this week.

Jean Mortensen) Guion, (Mrs. Dick)

A letter from Jean (bless her heart) Correction. Letter is signed “Dick and Jean”, but if so, Dick’s handwriting has changed quite a bit – – must be the Portuguese influence. Anyway the letter says: “First of all, Dad, I want to wish you a belated birthday wish from Dick and myself. I meant to write sooner so it would reach you on your birthday, but I just didn’t get around to it. Poor excuse, isn’t it! “Happy Birthday” just the same, Dad, and we’ll be thinking of you. Dick sent you a box of cigars. Did they reach you on time? (Yes, thank you.) Well, Dick and I have been two very busy people this past week. We went to two dances, a party, two movies and a USO show. That accounts for six of the days and the other one we entertained the Polish couple at our home! We had lots of fun but this week we’re going to try to get home early and catch up on some of our sleep. By the way, we’ve been gadding about since I got here. You’d think we were trying to make up for two years of separation in a few weeks. We aren’t – – it’s just that everything happens at once. It’s a lot of fun but a little tiring after a while. We haven’t had any pictures taken of our little house yet but as soon as we do, will send some to you. Dick’s assistant said he’d take some for us but he hasn’t had a chance to come out yet. I have a camera and films in my trunk but it is still someplace between here and New York. By the time it gets here, we’ll probably be ready to go home. That’s the Army for you – – slow motion.

The base is closing. They say everyone will be out of here by the end of the year. The fellows with the highest amount of points leave first, than the ones who have two years or more of overseas service – – that includes Dick, and he’s not sure he will go because I’m here. He wants to go home but he’d rather stay at this base than one in the states. They aren’t very strict so it’s really wonderful. We really don’t know what will happen, so you may be seeing us soon, or it may be a few more months. As you already know, you can’t depend on the Army. The fellows who have only a few months overseas will be sent to another base in this wing. All this business about the base closing has us in kind of a stew, though, we have two rooms of furniture that Dick bought and would like to sell it before we leave. Once Dick gets his orders we won’t have much time. Then again, if we were going to stay, we want to get a refrigerator. There is just no way of telling what’s going to happen so I guess we’ll just hang on to our furniture and continue eating at the base. Gosh, I’ll be so glad when this Army life is over and we will know what we can do. I’d like to ask another favor of either you or Marian. Would you take my beige wool dress and my green spring coat, that I sent home from Florida, to the cleaners?                                    Jean (and Dick)

Tomorrow and Wednesday, I’ll be posting the rest of this letter. Thursday and Friday will be the two parts of a Birthday Letter to Dave.

Judy Guion