Trumbull – Dear XXX – News About Family -October, 1945

Trumbull, Conn., October 14, 1945

Dear XXX (supply your own name here)

My thoughts this Sunday are errant ones, or to speak brutally, I am scatter-brained tonight and it’s too bad, too, because I must rely on myself and cannot resort to quotes to make the letter appear interesting. So here goes and if my topics appear like the nimble mountain goat that it jumpeth from crag to crag, just put it down to the turmoil of thought incident to the rapid coming and going of soldier boys, here today and gone tomorrow. Lad, for instance, who leaves Wednesday night for Devens (Ft. Devens in Massachusetts), driven thereto by Marian (physically, not mentally), presumably for transshipment to Aberdeen, (Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Aberdeen, Maryland, where he started his training over three years ago) following a 15-day extension of his original 30-day furlough. Marian returns alone, which translated in Guionese means that he has actually departed for Aberdeen. But lo, and behold, as his train passes Bridgeport, off he hops for another visit home, because Army orders read he does not need to report definitely to Aberdeen until tomorrow. So off he goes again this afternoon, to return – – – (write your own ticket.)

Meantime, we’re getting used to seeing Dick around again, and between Lad and Dick, there are a number of things around the house here that are getting done on rapid order, that have been vying for “doing” for some years. The furnace Stoker  regulated, the oven control on the kitchen (electric) stove fixed, the north slide on the kitchen table fixed, arm on the small maple chair in the alcove (the latter two by Dick), and in course of building a moth proof closet in the attic (also I Dick). Lad has also done a number of other mechanical repair jobs and both boys have helped sawing and chopping wood, etc. By the way, did I tell you that, in a small size windstorm the other day, another great branch or section of the north side of the Maple tree in the back of the house, split off about opposite where the other part fell off on the apartment roof, which leaves this particular tree, which I always admired for its symmetrical shape, looking rather anemic. But to ramble on, I’ve just had my car fixed up with new clutch, body bolts tightened, new muffler pipe, shock absorbers refilled, rubber bumper block installed, etc., so that it runs better than it has lately. How’s your Buick, Ced? I haven’t heard you say lately; in fact, I haven’t heard much from you about anything. Careful now, or I’ll begin to get up pressure again and explode right in P.O. Box 822, (and a few days after following usual custom, get a most contrite letter from you acknowledging that you should have written before, etc.). It’s about time also I heard again for Parisian Dan. Dave writes pretty regularly although I didn’t hear from him last week.

Jumping  now to the island proposition, which is the next thing that pops into my wondering mind, I am eagerly awaiting comments on the numerous questions I raised in my last letter and your several suggestions on the whole business. I know Lad and Marian have something in the works and Dick and Jean have something in contemplation. Elizabeth has not referred to the matter on the one or two occasions I have been in touch with her since, so I don’t know how enthusiastic she is about the thing. What do you think of the idea of planting, at some suitable spots on the island, a cherry tree, maybe some nut trees, fruit trees (apple, peach, pear, plum) possibly some grapevines, and how about an asparagus patch?

Aunt Betty Duryee

It was Aunt Betty’s birthday Thursday, and as that was our regular day for visiting Elizabeth, Dick and Jean also came over (Lad and Marian were enroute to Devens) we celebrated over there. And speaking of birthdays, one is coming up pretty soon for Dan. And in that connection, Dan, I neglected to mention in my last letter that a week ago Tuesday, I did receive your birth certificate from Mount Vernon with its assurance that you actually had been born, and this was sent on the same day to the government office requesting it at Philadelphia.

Tomorrow, the second half of this letter from Grandpa to Dan, Ced and Dave – Lad and Dick both being home.

On Saturday and Sunday, more Special Pictures.

Judy Guion

Special Pictures # 244 – P.B. Peabody Christmas card – 1928

For the next few weekends, I’ll be posting Special Pictures. These are photos that do not pertain directly to the letters I’m posting but are unique and interesting so I want to share them. Enjoy.

This home-made Christmas card comes from P.B. (Putnam Burton) Peabody, Arla Mary (Peabody) Guion’s Uncle.

 

 

 

 

Tomorrow I’ll begin posting letters written in 1945.Both Lad and Dick are home, Dan is in France – still in the Army – hoping to get out on points soon and waiting until Paulette and their unborn child can travel to Trumbull. Ced is in Alaska and Dave is in Manila, Philippines.

Judy Guion

Special Pictures # 241 – A Few of Grandpa’s Ancestors

For the next few weekends, I’ll be posting Special Pictures. These are photos that do not pertain directly to the letters I’m posting but are unique and interesting so I want to share them. Enjoy.

The following are pictures of Grandpa’s Grandparents, his parents and a picture of him at about one year old. These ancestors have very interesting lives, which I will be sharing in the future.

Clara Maria de los Dolores Marina (de Beck) Guion (Grandpa’s Grandmother)

The Reverend Elijah Guion (Grandpa’s Grandfather)

Ella (Duryee) Guion (Grandpa’s Mother)

Alfred Beck Guion (Grandpa’s Father)

Alfred Duryee Guion (at about 1 year old)

Tomorrow, another Special Picture. On Monday, a week of letters from 1943. Lad is anticipating his furlough and seeing Trumbull, and his family, again. Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Grandma Writes to Ced – December, 1941

Grandma Peabody

5 Curcuit Road

New Rochelle, N.Y.

Dec. 19,

Dear Cedric

I got your last letter a few days ago. It’s so interesting to know what you are doing and what’s going on out there.

There seems to be plenty going on in this part of the world. Didn’t the Japs play a dirty trick on us! And what a horrible thing it was for the Officers to allow the Japs to do so much harm. Well they are getting their reward leaving their important jobs.

I was surprised and glad to, that Rusty is with you. Although you seem busy all the time it must be nice to have a companion to talk and laugh with. If you are girls, you might even cry. Haven’t heard a thing from Trumbull. I hope they are all well. When I saw Aunt Betty last she seemed pretty well, and she was getting the use of her hand more and more. She is such a dear, so patient. We here, plod along as usual. Dorothy busy with her short hand. She has so little time for anything else.

We are hoping Anne, Donald and Gweneth (Stanley) will spend Christmas with us but she hasn’t made any definite plans known yet. How do you like that crocheted tie, do you ever use it? I would have liked to make some more. Donald, for instance, liked his so much.

Uncle Larry and Aunt Marian (Peabody)  have been so busy getting their new home in order. Painting and papering, etc., etc. They are so enthusiastic and happy.

I read in the paper a few days ago that Hitler is taking a rest. I hope it will be a long one. He is supposed to be sick, maybe unnerved.

Last Saturday we had our first snow but it turned into rain before the day was over and all the snow was gone in no time. We have had such a long dry spell. Up State there must be a good deal of snow according to papers and that will perhaps help out the water problem.

I imagine Trumbull is getting ready to receive Dick. He will be some Christmas present! Don’t you think it was a fine thing for you boys to get away from Trumbull! The chance of seeing some of the world is a fine education.

Dear Ced, I am not sending you any Christmas present. I did not know what to do for you. Wishing you a very happy Christmas, including Rusty, I am

With lots of love

Grandma

Tomorrow and Wednesday, I’ll be posting a letter from Grandpa to Ced, the only son away from home at this time.

Something special on Thursday. On Friday, I’ll post some Christmas and New Years cards.

Saturday and Sunday, Special Pictures – 

On Monday, I’ll continue with letters written in 1943, when four sons are working and/or training for duty with Uncle Sam.

Judy Guion

Special Picture # 240 – Grandma Arla and Her Three Sisters – Early 1900’s

For the next few weekends, I’ll be posting Special Pictures. These are photos that do not pertain directly to the letters I’m posting but unique and interesting so I want to share them. Enjoy.

Anne Peabody Stanley, Arla Mary Peabody Guion, Helen Peabody Human, Dorothy Peabody

Trumbull – Dear Silent Ones – November, 1941

Trumbull, Conn., November 30, 1941

Dear Silent Ones:

           Grandma Peabody

Ten o’clock in the evening is the time. Lad (driving), Dan, Barbara (Plumb, Dan’s girlfriend), Aunt Betty and myself left here about 1 o’clock with our movie equipment and motored, I believe that is the word, to Mt. Joy Place, New Rochelle, there to partake of a very nice meal. It was the first real Sunday dinner I had not cooked myself for months, and I did enjoy it. Later, (Aunt) Dorothy, Burton (Peabody) and Grandma (Peabody) came over. Dan showed his stills first and then Lad followed with the movies. I tried to find out from Grandma what Anne’s plans were for Christmas but she had not heard from Anne for some time and could give me no information on that score. Babe (Cecelia Mullins, Lad’s girlfriend) was supposed to go along with us today but she called up this morning and said she had a cold and did not feel like going along. Dave had his Young People’s meeting to attend so he did not go along, though I suspect the real reason was his dislike of having to be questioned by Aunt Dorothy as to the progress of his school work.

Dan has about decided to purchase a 1933 Chevrolet coupe which Carl has had for sale since August. I think it is one which he bought from Mr. Powell. I know little about it except that the price is $75. He has decided that he needs some means of getting back and forth from work. Since the shop has become unionized, he has to be at work by seven and quits at three in the afternoon, and as Lad does not have to report for work on his job until 9 AM, and leaves when his work is done, which may be anywhere from 5 to 7, it leaves Dan without timely transportation. He plans to get his markers tomorrow.

The weather continues quite mild. We have yet had no real cold days and not a speck of snow. Some of the trees have still not shed their leaves and we noticed today on the Parkway, that the Dogwood trees still carry leaves that have not entirely changed from green to brown.

I have been a waiting anxiously for a letter from you last week to tell me what the latest news is about your deferment. I hope there will be a letter either from you or Dick in the mail tomorrow.

Again there seems little noteworthy of transmission to you under the general subject of news. After recovering from his attack of flu, Kemper (Peabody)  was informed by the doctor that he had a mild case of diabetes and, while he does not have to take insulin, he does have to diet.

ADG - China - the good set

ADG - China - detail

Ethel (Bushey) presented me with a dinner plate exactly matching that gold bordered set of dishes (the good set) that we inherited from Aunt Mary Powers. She said she was in an antique shop in Mamaroneck and happened to notice this one dish and recognized that it was exactly like our set and she bought it for me. She said it was the only one they had.

Last week, very suddenly, the Times Star folded up. They had been losing money for some months but nobody expected it to discontinue so abruptly. Even the employees did not know anything about it when they came to work that morning. At 10 o’clock orders went around to write a swan song for the addition just going to press and at noon all employees were paid a week’s salary and dismissed. That leaves the Post-Telegram Cock of the Walk although there is a rumor that the Harold is going to put out a daily edition. I hired one of the girls temporarily that had been in their editorial department.

DAD

Tomorrow, more on the continuing story of Mary Ellum and Archie Wilson.

Next week I’ll be posting letters from 1943. Each week Grandpa anxiously awaits letters from his four oldest sons, all away from home and working for Uncle Sam.

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Post Cards From Aunt Helen (Peabody) Human – November, 1941

ADG - Post card of Guatemala Airport from H. Human

ADG - Post card of Guatemala Airport (message) 1941

This is one of the prettiest airports I’ve seen so far. You can see for yourself, one volcano and there are two more just as imposing. Everyone who comes here loves it and I know the men at this port will be sorry when their work is completed. So far since we left Brownsville we’ve been in Tampico and Mexico City. The plane trip from Mexico City to Guatemala City is the best so far.

Aunt Helen

ADG - Post card of Guatemala Plaza from H. Human - 1941

ADG - Post card of Guatemala Plaza from H. Human (message) 1941

This is an exceptionally beautiful old church and Plaza on a little hill so that in every direction you can get a most wonderful panoramic view of the city. We drove out to Antigua Sunday and saw the ruins of an old cathedral which was built in the 1500s and destroyed by an earthquake in 1773 I believe. What ruins remain are fascinating and beautiful. It was a tremendous thing. You will just have to see it all for yourself some day.

Helen

Tomorrow, I’ll finish the week with a letter from Grandpa to his two sons in Alaska.

On Saturday and Sun day more on the lives of Mary Ellum and Archie Wilson..

Next week, I’ll be posting letters from 1943,Lad’s interest in Marian Irwin seems to be heating up and vice versa..

Judy Guion