Peabodys and Duryees – Birthday Greetings From Grandma Peabody – March 22, 1940

Grandma Peabody at her home  - cropped

                        Grandma Peabody

26 Coligni Square

New Rochelle, N. Y.

Apt. 22

March 22, 1940

Dear Ladd,

This morning we are having a great snowfall. I awoke at five o’clock. The wind was blowing very hard and I got up to look if there had been snow or rain but there was neither. Grandma Peabody went back to bed listening to the wind and the windows rattling. About 5:30 I commenced hearing the foghorn and boats answering each other. About 6:00 I thought I smelled coffee and I got up again and went to the kitchen and there was Helen ((Peabody) Human, sister to Grandma Arla), sitting at the table with a cup of their frightfully strong coffee. She said she couldn’t offer me any because “I know it’s too strong for you.” I said there must be a very heavy fog the way the storm boat horns are blowing, she pulled up the window shade and said, “Look.” I was perfectly amazed to see the ground and trees heavily covered with snow. It was beautiful. It is now 9:30 and the snowfall has abated some and big chunks of snow are falling off the trees. I won’t be surprised if there is rain before long.

You have no doubt heard all about the terrible sleet storms we had as it reached Connecticut, too. In this section we were without heat and light from early Monday morning until Wednesday evening at seven. We lived in the kitchen where the gas oven was running from morning till night. All houses using oil burners run by electricity suffered. Kemper and Larry (Peabody, Grandma Arla’s brothers) have coal furnaces so they had heat. At Larry’s, they had no lights but got it back the day before we did. At Kemper’s, they had both light and telephone all right all the time. Our phone was also in order.

You may know as much as I do about the sleet storm. I presume you get the New York papers.

Ted (Human, Helen’s husband) brought your last letter to me to read. You are a wonderful letter writer. Always so interesting. You certainly seem to have plenty to do. That’s all right as long as you don’t overdo. Ted has been home all week with a cold but is improving. Dorothy (Peabody, Grandma Arla’s youngest sister) has been in bed since Sunday with a slight cold. But she is coming along fine. I am hoping this letter will arrive on your birthday. I am so sorry I can’t be near enough to make you a birthday cake. With my love and best wishes for your happiness, I am

Always your loving

Grandmother Peabody

11:30 AM – Sun is shining bright.

Tomorrow and Friday I will be posting an Easter letter from Grandpa. 

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Boys – Grandma Died Last Tuesday (1) – January 23, 1944

We hyave moved ahead to 1944. Dave has now joined the ranks of Uncle Sam’s Army and is in training at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Dick is at Forteliza, Brazil, working in a liaison capacity between the Army and the local employees. Ced remains in Anchorage, Alaska, repairing planes and going out to repair and retrieve downed planes. Dan is now stationed in London and working with the topography unit, although I do not know if they are yet working on maps of France in anticipation of D-Day. Lad and Marian have recently arrived in Texarkana, Texas, where Lad will be training mechanics for the Army

Grandma Peabody

          Grandma Peabody

Trumbull, Conn   Jan. 23, 1944

Dear Boys:

Grandma (Peabody) died last Tuesday at 11:30 AM, having been unconscious from the night before. She passed away quietly and peacefully, and if the expression may be permitted, happily, with her loved ones near. Death is, at best, a lonely adventure and is made more so when none near and dear are close by. Helen and Dorothy were there; Burton and Anne arrived later, as did Ced who was in New York and happened in about 11:30 to see them all. At Grandma’s request no funeral service was held, which, all with the exception of Kemper, met with the approval of the family. She was cremated Wednesday. Dorothy expects to continue living in the same apartment.

Grandma’s life span marks an era in American history which is fast becoming legendary. Born in Sweden, she came to this country as a young girl and with her parents settled as pioneers in what was the raw Far West in those days. Battling fierce Dakota winter storms and summer’s heat and drought, life was lived under the most primitive conditions. With Grandpa frequently away from home for days at a time, with the constant fear of marauding Indians, often facing periods verging on privation and want, she raised a family of seven children, never for once lowering her ideals of honor and integrity. Not knowing what the next day would bring she still carried on. In the light of these struggles when your mother was a baby, the words of that beautiful old hymn take on for me a greater significance:

Lead, kindly light, amid the encircling gloom,

Lead thou me on,

The night is dark, and I am far from home,

Lead thou me on.

Keep thou my feet! I do not ask to see

the distant scene; one step enough for me.

I like to think of Grandma going to join Grandpa and your mother — going home, as it were, after a long and useful journey:

So long thy power hath blest me, sure it still

will lead me on,

O’er moor and fen, o’er crag and torrent, till

the night is gone;

and with the morn those angel faces smile,

Which I have loved long since, and lost a while.

In the intimate service which we hold each in the stillness of our own hearts at her passing, I am reminded of a little prayer which years ago as director of the church boys club (The Brotherhood of St. Andrew) was customarily part of our closing service: “Guide us all the day long, oh Lord, through this troubulous life until the shadows lengthen and the evening, and the fever of life is over and our work is done. Then in thy tender mercy grant us a safe lodging and rest in peace at last with Thee.”

So passes from this earth one whom it has been good to know and who can set for us all an example of courage and faithfulness to ideals which can be a treasured memory, and an inspiration.

Tomorrow, the conclusion of this letter.

Judy Guion

Elizabeth’s Adventure in St. Petersburg, Florida (8) – Report Cards (2) – February 4, 1935

This is the rest of the letters Biss wrote in February, 1935.

Dave

        David Peabody Guion

Sunday evening

8:29 PM

Dear Dave:

This envelope is so fat already that I will just be able to write a short note to you because I’m afraid it can’t hold much more junk. Don and Gwen were both put ahead, Gwen to 3A and Don to 5A. I passed all subjects and so don’t have to repeat which I think is quite nice and also quite unusual. I’ll finish this tomorrow.

It is now Monday afternoon at 5:46 PM I got my new guitar today and I am thrilled !!!! It certainly is worth every cent I paid for it.

We had a Chinese man visit our school today and he told us a lot about China. Maybe if you remember it and remind me, I will tell you when I get home. I have a lot of things planned for when I get home and if you and Dick learn to get along well, I feel sure we will have lots and lots of fun together. Be sure to answer this letter for I love to hear from you. I’ll send you a picture of the speaker we had. You will see that he is quite nice looking. I had expected to see a yellow faced looking man with just slanty slits for eyes and what a surprise I got! Well I have to go downtown and get Don for he went for his music lessons about an hour ago. I am expecting to hear from you very soon.

Love,

Biss

Richard (Dick) Peabody Guion

 Richard Peabody Guion (Dick)

Monday evening,   8:16 PM

Dear Dick,

Boy, what a “D” that is in ”Dear”, hey what? I am going to get orange juice in a few minutes but I am going to try to finish it before I go. Tell Dad that the fruit man’s son, who broke his neck, got pendicitis (acute at that) but that he pulled through and is now at home for he did not enjoy the hospital. Tell Jane that I will write to her as soon as possible.

I told Dave that I felt sure all three of us (or four if Peggy will come back only I’m afraid I have lost her for she seems to be so happy where she is) but I will try to take her place and play with you more and go out into the woods, we could have lots of fun and I will have lots and lots of stories to tell you and you will have lots and lots to tell me, I hope. Well, we can tell the stories while doing our work and it won’t take long at all to do it.

I am getting more and more anxious to see Trumbull again. I passed everything and am I glad! Those two hour (each) exams were nightmares!

Don Stanley

              Don Stanley

Donald at last has a new friend so he doesn’t have to go around with Billy so much anymore. He still goes around with him somewhat though. Save the football and baseball until I get home. Do you still have skiing? How is skating?

Tell me all about these things in a letter to me and make it snappy! Donald and I tried playing some duets on the guitars and they sounded quite nice. Gee, if I don’t give the guitar any rest it will be all worn out before I can show it to all of you up there. Be sure and not tell anyone about it and I miss the family again.

Love,

Bis

P.S. Hurry up and write!

P.P.S. I couldn’t write two sheets because the envelope is too full!

I think this is a second – or third – installment – to her letter to her father, but since she doesn’t address it to anyone, I’m guessing.

Friday – 4:36 PM

I received your letter yesterday, and the check, and the letter from Parents Magazine, and the news from Trumbull, and Dan’s second installment. Are you going to have my magazine a free installment? I would like it, if it is all right with you for then I would have no fear of its expiring at the end of the year the way I have been and next year I will be able to ask for “Good Housekeeping” instead and thereby get the two magazines I like best. I wanted “Good Housekeeping  this year but felt that you didn’t have the money for it so I didn’t bother to ask for it.

I got my geometry report today and got 85 – my average is only 76%. It looks as though Ced has the upper hand. I am getting my guitar either Monday or Thursday so you will see me with a guitar when I get home. I am going to put on 3 3-cent stamps so it should get there O.K. There is something wrong if it doesn’t.

Gwen Stanley

            Gwen Stanley

Gwen has “water on the knee” and Aunt Anne took her to the doctor today. I think one thing but my hand keeps writing another – I was going to say doc tonight instead of Doctor and today my hand wrote correctly where as my mind didn’t think as it should.

Don has a steam engine just like Alfred’s steam boiler. The one we fooled with so much last year. Well I want to reel off a number of things to Ced so I guess I’ll say goodbye to you for, if I keep on going I won’t stop and then I can’t send the letters for I’ll still be writing and I’ll starve because I’ll be writing instead of eating and then the letter will never be finished because I’ll die of starvation and fatigue before I finish it – soooo, goodbye until the next time.

Love,

Biss

Tomorrow I will start posting letters written in 1944. Dave has now joined the ranks of Uncle Sam’s Army and is in training at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Dick is at Forteliza, Brazil, working in a liaison capacity between the Army and the local employees. Ced remains in Anchorage, Alaska, repairing planes and going out to repair and retrieve downed planes. Dan is now stationed in London and working with the topography unit, although I do not know if they are yet working on maps of France in anticipation of D-Day. Lad and Marian have recently arrived in Texarkana, Texas, where Lad will be training mechanics for the Army.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Boys – Lad is in the Army (2) – May 10, 1942

page 2     5/10/42

It’s too bad you boys can’t claim exemption on account of paralysis of your writing fingers. As far as I know secondhand, Dan is too busy planting flowers to write, no word having come from him this week. This could be born with more fortitude if the phone had rung last night and a voice said, “This is your son, Dan, at the Bridgeport railroad station”. I must say he is impartial in his neglect as Barbara (plumb, Dan’s girlfriend) is considerably burned up about her inability to get letters also.

I did get a postal from a Mrs. Beckwith of Roanoke Rapids, who very kindly wrote what she calls a “keeping -in-touch” card to me telling me she had met Dan, was inviting him to supper and had a son of her own about his age in the Army.

Ced @ 1945

Cedric Duryee Guion

          And I seem to have lost my pulling power with you, too, Ced, for in spite of my splendid example of invariably writing to you backsliders once a week, come hell or high water, I can’t seem to get either of you on a weekly schedule. I hope Lad will do better because it will be pretty tough having three boys away and not hearing from any of them regularly. I know it’s tough to have so exacting a father, but that also you can blame on the war. Maybe I’ll stop writing for a month or so and wait for you to ask some questions. It’s too easy having home news sent to you without any effort once a week. Maybe you wouldn’t mind it so much at that, and then where would I be?

And speaking of asking questions, Dick was asking today if Ced wouldn’t write him what the labor situation was at present at the airbase, if they still needed men and were still paying the same salaries. From a few remarks he has dropped I surmise jobs and salaries here do not compare favorably with his Alaskan experience. In your next (?) letter home, Ced, tell us a bit about how you are getting along with your flying, which you haven’t mentioned for months. Was your boss successful in getting a deferment for you? Have you filled out your questionnaire yet?

This week I managed to get three packages off to you which I hope will arrive in time for your birthday. Two of them are from Read’s — not much but just to let you know you are not forgotten. I also sent direct a box of miscellaneous junk. A couple of small items will gladden Rusty’s heart when he is confronted with an overdone batch of apricots cooking on the stove all night. Be sure to let me know when they arrive so I can put in claims for them if they are lost in transit.

Among news briefs are these: A new gray line bus now runs to Trumbull, up Reservoir Avenue, as far as Ray King’s place just beyond the Merritt Parkway. Wardens have a washing machine, his present to her for Mother’s Day. Next month she has to go to the hospital for a minor operation.

Blog - Lilac Bush

Speaking of Mother’s Day (today) Aunt Betty thoughtfully arranged a bunch of lilacs (which are now in bloom) on the dinner table today in memory of your mother. Yesterday at the Town Hall I united a couple in matrimony. Lad is trying to sell his car. He is trying to get $750 for it. He paid $900. On account of tire and gas rationing the market is none too good. If he can’t get $700 for it he will store it for the duration.

The following letter from Grandma (Peabody): “I have been on the half and half sick list since February 16th. The first two weeks Dorothy had to stay out of school to care for me. It made it pretty hard for her because she wanted to keep up with her studies along with doing the housework. I am feeling much better. My heart was quite bad for a while. You may be surprised to know we are both staying at Kemper’s (Peabody, one of Grandma Arla’s brothers), who has moved into this lovely large house which they are renting. They are renting their own house. Last Sunday Kemper and Ethel left for Vermont to be gone until next Tuesday. I would like very much to make you a visit and enjoy the lilacs but it may be some time yet before I can and by then the lilacs will be gone. What an experience Ced is having.”

Tomorrow, The Induction Booklet presented to Lad at the Shelton Railroad Station on May 14th, 1942. 

Judy Guion 

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (30) – A Letter From Grandma Peabody – September 13, 1934

Grandma Peabody

Grandma Peabody

September 13

Dear Cedric,

Your welcome letter came several days ago. I am so glad you are home again because I could not help worrying about you.

I would certainly like to see you and hear of your visits and all about the relatives you visited. You must have had a great time

Did you like haying and threshing? I know all about such things. You should have seen us (the Westlin’s) carrying lunches out to the men haying, and to the threshing crews when that work started usually late in September, sometimes as late as October. The wind would blow and it was cold. The men were always so glad for the hot coffee, sandwiches and cake.

I believe I told your father I am moving to New York City in a short time to live with Aunt Dorothy. I am wondering if it will be easier for you to come to New York to make a visit rather than Ossining. We are all anxious to hear any news.

No news from here, everything seems to go jogging along as usual.

Lovingly,

Grandma

My love to all of you.

Tomorrow, I will begin a week of letters written in 1940, when Lad is the only son away from home.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – To My Scattered Flock (1) – A Visit With Grandma Peabody – January 2, 1944

Alfred Duryee Guion (Grandpa)

Trumbull, Conn.  Jan. 2, 1944

To my scattered flock:

There are several matters of import to record in this my first letter of the new year. First, about Grandma (Peabody). Burton (Peabody, her son) phoned me at the office early in the week to say that his mother was very weak and the doctor had told them she had not many more days before starting out on the great adventure. Might be a week, possibly two weeks, but to be safe and in accordance with Grandma’s wishes, all the children were summoned to her bedside. Thursday, Ced, Jean and I, together with Elizabeth, her two kids (Butch and Marty), Flora (Bushey) and Red (Sirene) all went down on the train together. We phoned to Anne ((Peabody) Stanley, her daughter) from Elsie’s (Duryee, Grandpa’s sister) shop and learned that Grandma would like to see us that afternoon, so, Red and Flora, having planned to attend some movie, Jean and Ced and I went to Grandma’s while Elizabeth stayed at Anne’s apartment some blocks away with her two children, then Ced and Jean left to meet Red while I went back to Anne’s to amuse the kids while Elizabeth went over to see Grandma. Grandma looks very bad, but is alert and interested in all that goes on. She was interested in reading Marian’s ((Irwin) Guion, Lad’s new wife) letter and also one from Dan, doing so propped up in bed without the aid of her glasses, too. Physically she is extremely weak, there apparently being a combination of intestinal and liver trouble. Helen ((Peabody) Human, her daughter) was there with Anne. Dorothy (Peabody, her Youngest daughter) had gone to work. Kemper (Peabody), Marion and Larry (Peabody, her son and his wife) had come on but Larry and Marian, with Alan (now 7 years old) had gone to see old friends in New Rochelle and Kemper had gone to Mount Vernon. Before we left Anne’s apartment to come home, Larry phoned from the Grand Central and he and Marian came down and we all had supper together. I neglected to say that Dave had gone down to see Grandma the day before and to my place at the office Thursday, as otherwise I would have had to close up shop.

Daniel (Dan) Beck Guion

Daniel Beck Guion

Two airmail letters from Dan, one in the first part of the week and the other the last day of the old year, sort of ended up 1943 in good style. His first letter mentioned having had a very pleasant Thanksgiving Day with Mr. and Mrs. Heath, of whom he says he has never encountered any people more sincerely generous than the Heath’s. He mentions receiving three invitations to Christmas celebrations, but “the old fox is waiting to see which invitation will be most worthwhile”. His second letter describes a short furlough which he spent in a visit to Cornwall in a little town called St. Ives (of Mother Goose fame) and a short distance from Penzance, immortalized by Gilbert and Sullivan’s Pirates. He was guest of a very hospitable elderly retired couple named Burnett who were introduced to him by mail through the kindness of one of the Red Cross workers.

Dear Dan:

Lt. P. R. Martin, the Censor who usually goes over your letters, felt it his duty to remove the Heath’s address, but he very courteously wrote the following note: “Send the articles to T-5 Guion. Sorry I must cut the address out; however it is of little importance.” Accordingly, I had D. M. Read Company make up a package of bath salts, powder and soap and will get it off to you early in 1944. Are you getting some good movies or Kodachrome pictures or won’t they allow the use of a camera in England? Send me another list of things you want sent, now that we know they arrive, even though somewhat delayed. I think hereafter, that with every package I send you, I shall include some item of cosmetic or toilet article as gifts to those who are so good to you, BUT, please, in every letter make a definite request which I can show the post office as otherwise packages will not be accepted for mailing overseas. We all enjoy your letters very much and it’s so good to know you are well and content.

Tomorrow I’ll post the conclusion of this letter, with notes to Lad and Marian. The week ends with two more letters from Marian.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (28) – A Letter From Aunt Mary Peabody – August 21, 1934

The following letter was originally sent to St. Paul but was forwarded to Star Prairie and I believe Ced received it before he left for Ohio and the Air Races. 

CDG - Coming of Age Adventure - Pettigrew Museum envelope - Aug., 1934.jpeg

CDG - Perrtigrew Museum (1) - Aug., 1934

CDG - Coming of Age Adventure - Pettigrew Museum (2) - Aug., 1934

August 21, 1934

Dear Cedric:

Aunt Marian, cousins Ruth, Nora, Edith and I were glad to have your card and were sorry we could not go to see you in St. Paul. This is a busy place – 800 visitors shown through the building already this month, which keeps us busy indeed. Ruth is here for a short visit, leaving tomorrow for Morgantown, West Virginia. Edith is staying here and attending Business college. She hopes to get some kind of work in September; is now devoting her time to shorthand and typing. It is good that one of you at least has had a glimpse of your Western home. It seems too bad when families scatter and lose track of each other. All of great grandfather Peabody’s nieces and nephews were as old or older than my mother’s. That makes cousins on that side much older than me. No one knew more than two first cousins on that side and five cousins once removed. There are probably more than 100 people nearby related to us who are utter strangers to us. Don’t let your generation do that – the world is so very much smaller than it was 70 years ago, and it is so much easier to go from one place to another than it was some 35 years ago. Please give my love to your family when you see them again. I was happy to have a glimpse of some of you last fall. Aunt Marian and all her cousins send greetings.

Affectionately,

Aunt Mary

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (27) – Grandpa’s Lost Letter – August, 1934

This letter was written by Grandpa on July 30, 1934 and mailed to Ced to reach him while he was visiting the Chicago World’s Fair and staying at the Chicago YMCA. Ced left Chicago Monday morning, July 30th, and the letter arrived on Wednesday, Aug. 1, 1934. The YMCA held the letter for 14 days.  They marked it “Unclaimed” on Aug. 14 and mailed it back to Grandpa. Grandpa wrote a note on the envelope  before sending it to Ced at Star Prairie, Wisc.

CDG - Lost letter, July 30, 1934

 

CDG - Lost letter (Note) - July 30, 1934

Grandpa’s note reads:

Thurs, 8/16/1934

This was just returned to me this morning.

Brief News Summary

Uncle Fred (Stanley) stayed overnight. He brought Lyman with him.

Arnold (Gibson, Lad’s best friend)  is O.K. He had some infected sore in his leg which the doctor took care of.

He went to school yesterday.

The girls can now say they have been to Yale. I had to go to New Haven yesterday on business,

so I took them with me. They had only time to walk around a bit and go through two of the buildings.

=======================

Next time you write include a list of those you would like to have invited to a “Welcome Home”

party. I am rather puzzled as to how many and who to invite and hesitant to leave it to the girls’

judgement.

How is the raincoat standing up? Did you loose your knife with the address book?  Based on your experiences, what additional equipment would you take on a trip of this sort next time?

DAD

****************************************************
This is the letter:

Trumbull, July 30

Dear Ced,

Monday night, dishes are washed and Elizabeth (Bissie, Grandpa’s only daughter) and Peg (Peg Beebe, her friend) are out in Irwin’s (Laufer) truck and Dick is just putting the finishing touches on his packing. He leaves for camp at 8:30 tomorrow.

But to go back. A week ago yesterday Aunt Helen ((Peabody) Human) and Dorothy (Peabody) came up and told of your visit at New York and Ossining. Dan and Lad came home (from their work at the CCC Camps). Lad of course spent most of his time on the motorcycle. During the week Arnold (Gibson) took off the generator which I left with Mr. Page and I also had the battery rebuild by Carr. Cost $3.75. Lad came home Friday PM, having first stopped at Page’s and retrieved the generator. We had a rush job Saturday at the office, so the whole gang, including Lad, went down and finished up a 5000 mimeograph job, run both sides – 10,000 impressions. We then got Lad’s battery. Saturday afternoon Rusty (Huerlin) came up to get me to help him on an idea for a Lucky Strike advertising series. Dan did not come home at all this weekend and I have not heard from him. Sunday was uneventful.

Tonight I stopped at the store (Kurtz’s Store, which houses the Trumbull Post Office) and got your letter from Chicago – which brings us up to date. Incidentally, here is a cartoon from today’s telegram which amused Dick. It might also be interesting to show to some of those, like the man in the Auburn who related his story about his hitchhiker experience, who seemed a bit hesitant.

One day last week we had a severe rainstorm, with wind, which evidently dislodged a Chimney Swift nest in the dining room chimney. When we got up in the morning we heard a very queer noise and found two baby Swift’s who had fallen down the chimney into the dining room. In spite of Dick’s and Elizabeth’s efforts at feeding them, they expired within a day of one another and were buried under the Lilac Bush near the back door.

Blog - Lilac Bush

Lilacs

We have been pretty busy at the office this week. George had the automatic going today, imprinting 10,000 letterheads for Mercer.

David is still at camp. After supper one day last week (ink has run out of pen) we all took a trip up to the Hemlock’s (on same road as Huntington’s junk place) and paid him a visit. While he did not admit it, he seemed happy and cheerful enough, is eating better and looks well. He may come home next week. Here is a card I received from him. The little boy blue he refers to is a wooden door stop which he made up there under their direction.

That’s all the home news I can think of right now. It is certainly good to know you are so nicely fixed at the YMCA. Inside rooms are often quieter and better to sleep in than outside. I’m also glad you had a chance to visit with the Draz’s and renew old family contacts. Will be much interested to hear all about them in detail when you get back.

One man told me of a stunt some boys did in getting to the Pacific coast by your method. They would go to some leading hotel, clean-shaven, neatly dressed, shoes shined, hair brushed, etc. and ask the clerk if they might look over the register for names of people from their hometown who were checking out that day. When any were located, they would waylay them at the desk as they were leaving and briefly explain just what they were doing, where they were going, etc. and if it would be convenient if they had room in their car etc. Very often, in the case of traveling men, they were glad for the company and they liked it better than picking some unknown up on the road. The conversation I suppose would run something like this: “Pardon me, but aren’t you Mr. Smith from Bridgeport? I saw in the hotel register your name listed as from my own hometown and I wondered if you happen to be going in the direction of St. Paul, and could conveniently let me bum a ride. I came out here to see some relatives by hitchhike method and stopped to see the fair.”

I just noticed that your letter mailed Thursday at 7:30 PM from Chicago did not reach me until Monday PM. Even assuming it arrived last mail Saturday, if you stay only the four days, you are leaving today and this note, which can’t be mailed until Tuesday a.m., Wednesday noon is probably the earliest it will reach the YMCA and I’m wondering if you’ll be there.

You haven’t said anything in any of your letters as to how the finances are holding out. Have you tried to cash in any Travelers checks yet?

I’m awfully glad you are making this trip. It’s something you will always look back on with pleasure. While I hadn’t any fear whatsoever about your being able to take care of yourself, it will broaden your knowledge of human nature, affording additional opportunities of practicing self-reliance and add another interesting chapter to your journey through life. The kind of thing I wish I had done when I was your age. Just the same, I miss you, old standby, and I’ll be really glad to see you march up the driveway soon.

Love

Dad

Tomorrow, another letter written during Ced’s Amazing Adventure.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (26) – Ced’s Travel Journal – Chicago to Star Prairie, Wisconsin – August, 1934

Ced has been writing a diary of his trip and he sends sections of it home to Grandpa for safe keeping. The following are pages 10 – 14.

Ced - 1938

Cedric Duryee Guion 

Thursday

(August 2, 1934)

Dear Dad,

I am staying with Uncle Kenneth, Aunt Nora, and their three children; Allan, Joyce and seven weeks old Muriel, at Star Prairie, Wisconsin. I arrived in New Richmond Tuesday night and Uncle Douglas met me there.

I believe I left off on the “letter diary” at my arrival in Cleveland, therefore I will begin there. The first day at the Fair I started at the 12th St. Gate and then went through the park parallel with the islands, very thoroughly during the day, and also through the island. I looked at everything and went inside everything that looked interesting. There were many interesting things but nothing outstanding.

The second day I went into Old England where I met a friend of the Draz’s which they had told me about there. That evening I saw the Chrysler track where Barry Oldfield and his “hell drivers” put on a demonstration with Plymouths. They took two Plymouths and ran them through some sandpits where they certainly did some wonderful tricks. I saw the Ford building that afternoon and in it were some wonderful old carriages and autos, some of the most interesting I put on the inside cover of the diary from the railway booklet which I sent you with the other junk.

CDG - Of interest in the Fird Exhibit

Of  Interest at the Ford and Chrysler exhibits

I took another big section that day and the next day finished up with the trip through the Fairgrounds. I saw the Drama of Transportation which was quite a lot like the Fair of the Iron Horse, which we saw in Baltimore. I was supposed to start Monday morning of this week but I dropped Alfred’s watch on the tile floor in the shower and broke the balance wheel staff, and had to wait to have this fixed. I got started about noon and walked almost out of Chicago before getting a ride. This man carried me about 2 miles and then I walked a mile or so and was carried another 2 miles. I walked about half a mile and was carried about a mile, than I walked another half-mile and rode a mile and then got a ride for two blocks, then I got a 5 mile ride and walked about a mile on a wrong road, but I got a ride to the right one very quickly. Next, I walked 2 miles rode two, walked one, rode two, walked one, rode one, walked one and got a ride in a Ford V-8 truck for almost 100 miles, about that time it got dark and I walked along a little traveled road for about 5 miles when a model T picked me up and took me into Madison, Wisconsin, where I was going to look up Rudolph, but at a drugstore they told me that he was not in the same house and they called Harold’s home and found that Rudolf was in Chicago studying for a higher position   and Harold was in  Wabeno, Wisconsin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabeno,_Wisconsin) for his hay fever but a cousin of theirs was at Harold’s place, and they invited me out for the night. Fred Shaken (the cousin) was there with two classmates and they are all going to the University of Wisconsin. I left early the next morning with Star Prairie as my goal. I walked about 2 miles and discovered I had left my bathing suit but decided not to go back as the house would probably be locked anyway and then the first crack off the bat a 1934 Chevrolet came along and picked me up, the driver decided not to be  the driver and so I took his place. We stopped and he got a glass of beer and gave me a bottle of root beer, then we arrived at the Dells, Wisconsin (a state scenic place in case you don’t know),  (https://dnr.wisconsin.gov/topic/parks/mirrorlake/recreation/camping    he had me drive in and he showed me all one could see from a car and then we went on to his destination. Then I walked about a quarter of a mile and was picked up and carried about 6 miles. I walked another mile and a 1934 Studebaker picked me up. I walked through a small town and was carried about a quarter of a mile and then walked another quarter of a mile when a Packard picked me up and carried me about 3 miles. That I walked about 2 miles and a Ford picked me up. I was going all the way but suddenly the fan pulley broke off, the generator stopped working and the broken piece broke one of the fan blades and caused a big hole in the radiator  (the motor had only been driven 1200 miles since repairs and there was no cooling system) so we limped into a garage with a very hot motor and I went on alone again.

I got a ride in another 1934 Buick and for the first time in my life, much to my sorrow and discomfort, we came upon a very horrible accident, a boy on a bike had been struck and apparently very badly hurt. The one hitting him had apparently evacuated and left the boy to die. The new Buick I was in went on to the next town for a doctor and we did 85 and 90 all the way  (about 4 miles).

Next Saturday I will finish this long letter to Grandpa telling of Ced’s walk/ride from Chicago to Star Prairie, Wisconsin.

Tomorrow I will begin posting letters written in 1942. Dan is in the Army at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia, for his Basic Training. Lad is classified 1-A and expects to be called up any day. The rest of the family attempt to live a normal life but things have changed.

Judy Guion

Ced’s Amazing Adventure (25) – Letter From Grandma Peabody About a Bus Accident – August, 1934

Grandma Peabody

Grandma Peabody (Anna Charlotta Westlin Peabody)

(Grandma Arla’s mother)

August eight

Dear Cedric,

I was so relieved when I received your card telling of being at Uncle Kenneth and Aunt Nora’s. You did not state how long you expected to stay with them but I am taking a chance hoping this letter will find you still there on the farm.

It’s wonderful to know you are meeting so many of the relatives. I’m sure you will enjoy knowing them all. Don’t you think Uncle Kenneth and Aunt Nora very nice? I fell in love with her when I met her.

Last Sunday afternoon Burton (Peabody) and I went over to Trumbull, having received a letter from Elizabeth inviting us, also telling us Aunt Corinne was there on a visit. I don’t suppose you remember her very much, do you? It was nice to see the family again. Laddie and Daniel were home. Dickey was away at camp. They all seemed fine.

Monday afternoon I was very pleasantly surprised by (my daughters) Anne (Peabody Stanley) and Dorothy (Peabody), Arla’s sisters) arriving unannounced. They are both fine. Aunt Anne expects to leave for Vermont the latter part of this week. Uncle Larry (Peabody) and Aunt Marian are leaving today. If you could hitchhike to Vermont too, you would have some more happy times.

Things here in Ossining are running along the usual way again. That gruesome accident made quite a stir up. ( http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1934/07/23/page/1/article/14-are-killed-in-bus-crash-23-others-hurt)  (https://www.facebook.com/HistoricOssining/posts/559085660800614) It was horrible. Most of those injured were brought up St. Paul’s Place to the hospital which is some blocks away on the street above us. Also the dead were taken to the undertaker who lives on the other side of St. Paul’s Church. As only one person could be carried in the ambulance and trucks, it took a long time before all were cared for. There was such a clanging of bells, and noise from autos. Hundreds of autos passed our place. Burton (Peabody) was very busy getting all possible information and did not get home till after midnight. One young man lost his father, mother and a sister, 13 years old.

Today’s papers are telling again of the terrible heat wave in the middle west, and that we will get it. Thermometer shows 80° today. I would love to hear from you again. Please give my love to everyone and keep a lot for yourself.

Lovingly,

Grandma

Tomorrow, we hear from Ced who is in Star Prairie, Wisconsin. 

Judy Guion