Special Picture #338 – Trumbull House – Then and Now – Side of the Barn – 1943 – 2018

 

View of the side of the barn

 

Photo of Lad (Alfred Peabody, my father) standing on the side of the barn, probably on his furlough in September, 1943.

 

Tomorrow another post about one of my ancestors.

On Monday, I’ll begin posting letters written in 1943, a momentous year for Lad in California.

Judy Guion

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Special Picture # 337 – Trumbull House – Then and Now – Screened Porch and Dining Room Door – 1940 – 2018

Recently I spent a night in the Trumbull House visiting with Paulette – Aunt Chiche to family and friends – and took quite a few pictures. For the next few Saturdays I will be posting pictures taken during this stay as well as older pictures of similar places taken over the years, when I have them. I hope you enjoy.

 

 

Trumbull House – Screened Porch and Dining Room Door – date unknown

Trumbull House with Screened Porch and Dining Room door – 1940

The following is a childhood memory recorded by me with my Uncle Dave.

I don’t know how to explain it because the house, the Big House, has changed so much with renovations but  there used to be a screen porch on the southeast corner of the house and there was a window there that looked from the stairs out onto the porch. Don and Gwen (Stanley) were there and Dick and I were talking, talking, talking, talking, talking. We had been warned on two or three occasions to quiet down and go to sleep. If Dick has told this story it will be a different version than mine because what happened was the last one to speak when the last warning came, was me. So, I was sent upstairs away from the rest of them and as I went up the stairs, I kicked at the window to warn them that I was going to cause trouble for them. Anybody else and everybody else will tell you that I kicked in the window on purpose, but at any rate, I never bought that story. It was a warning. I kicked it into warn them but I broke it. The next thing I knew, my father came charging up the stairs gave me a good spanking and sent me to bed. When I got into bed, I began to feel something sticky down around my right foot. I was already crying and upset, and when I checked it, I’d cut my foot on the glass, which made me feel still more hurt and angry, and suffering such a terrible injustice. I was probably nine or 10 when that happened, maybe eight, well it had to be after my mother had died and I was seven she died.

Tomorrow I’ll begin posting letters written in 1946. The most notable event will be the birth of Grandpa’s first granddaughter in France.

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (4) – Ella (Duryee) Guion – 1850 – 1919

(1) Ella (Duryee) Guion, (2) Alfred Duryee Guion, (3) Alfred Peabody Guion, (4) Judith Anne Guion

Ella Duryee was born on July 2, 1850, the second daughter of Joseph Woodward Duryee and Eliza Pell (Beadel) Duryee. She had three younger sisters, Florence, born in 1855, Lillian, born in 1860 and Elizabeth (Lizzie) born in 1863. Her father was a prominent lumber merchant in New York City.

Ella Duryee

On September 16, 1882, at the age of 32, she married Alfred Beck Guion in Manhattan, New York. Alfred was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, and moved to New York to become a stockbroker.

Their first child, Alfred Duryee Guion (my Grandpa) was born on September 11, 1884 in New York City.

Alfred Duryee Guion (my Grandpa) circa 1885.

Three years later, their daughter, Elsie May, was born in Mount Vernon, New York.

Ella (Duryee) Guion and Elsie May Guion on the front porch of the Lincoln Avenue House in Chester Hill.

A quote from Alfred Duryee Guion’s Reminiscences:

Soon thereafter we moved into a brand-new house which my father had built in a newer part of town known as Chester Hill. My father, who insisted on having the best, regardless of expense, was quite proud of this house. He had an architect design it. My grandfatherJoseph Woodward Duryee), being in the lumber business, was able to procure exceptional lumber for its construction so that each of the rooms was finished differently, one in Cherry, one in Black Walnut, one in Quartered Oak, one in Circassian Walnut, etc., all selected for their beautiful graining. On the ground floor was what we called the “Round Room” in which even the windowpanes were curved glass. The maid’s room on the top floor was necessary because in those days it was customary to hire a maid.

One year as our vacation had ended at a farmhouse in upper New York State, the morning had come when we were to leave for home. My mother had saved out my best bib and tucker for the homeward journey, the big trunk holding all our clothes had been carefully packed, the huge leather strap that went around it had been tightened and buckled, and the husky, hired man had come to take it down the stairs to the buckboard en route to the railroad station. Breakfast was not quite ready and I was told I might go out and play in the yard near the house but NOT TO GET MY NICE, CLEAN, CLOTHES DIRTY. Right in front of the house was a little brook spanned by a foot-bridge. I avoided the bridge itself but stood at one side of the muddy bank to watch little chips of wood I threw float downstream. I slipped and fell into the brook, got up all wet and muddy and went back to my mother. This time it was she and not my father who told me a few things.

Alfred Duryee Guion in a self-portrait in the Lincoln Avenue House.

 

Ella (Duryee) Guion

Ella (Duryee) Guion was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, her lineage tracing back to her great-great-grandfather, Joseph Woodward  who served in the Light Horse under Mandajor Ebenezer Backus at Harlem Heights. He was captured and died in the person ship “Jersey”.

Alfred Duryee Guion, their dog and Elsie May Guion in front of the Lincoln Avenue house.

 

Alfred Beck Guion and Ella Duryee Guion (far right) and 3 unidentified women, possibly Ella’s sisters, Florence, Lillian and Elizabeth (Lizzie)) on the porch of the Lincoln Avenue house.

He (my Father) worked for a brokerage firm on Wall Street and was quite conscientious, so much so that in years of panic (today we would call it depression), losses of his clients, as well, I suspect, as of his own, worried him to the extent of bringing on heart trouble. He died in his 40s from angina pectoris, leaving a heavily mortgaged home and comparatively little life insurance. A Masonic friend of my father’s kindly stepped in and negotiated the sale of the Lincoln Avenue house for a smaller house on Dell Avenue, with a small cash surplus. It entailed a considerably lower standard of living. My mother, who had a sunny, even-tempered disposition, made the best of things. After my grandfather died, my aunts, Mary, Lillian and Lizzie (who preferred to be called Aunt Betty) came to live with us and helped share in living expenses.In the 1900 Census, recorded on June 6, 1900, Ella Guion (49) is listed as living on Dell Avenue in Mount Vernon, New York. Living with her is her son, Alfred (15), her daughter, Elsie May (12), and her sisters, Lillian ((40) and Lizzie (36).

 

fr: Ella Duryee Guion, Elsie May Guion; back: Alfred Duryee Guion, and possibly Aunt Lillian and Aunt Betty (Lizzie).

 

Alfred Duryee Guion in front of the Dell Avenue house in Mt. Vernon, NY, circa 1902.

 

(Possibly Lizzie and Lillian) with Alfred Duryee Guion (standing), Spot at his feet and Ella (Duryee) Guion on the far right.

Ella (Duryee) Guion passed away 5 September, 1919, in Mount Vernon, New York.

Tomorrow, I will begin posting letters written in 1944. all five sons are no serving Uncle Sam, with the youngest, Dave, in the midst of his early training.

Judy Guion

Special Picture # 336 – Trumbull House – Then and Now – Side Patio –

Recently I spent a night in the Trumbull House visiting with Paulette – Aunt Chiche to family and friends – and took quite a few pictures. For the next few Saturdays I will be posting pictures taken during this stay as well as older pictures of similar places taken over the years, when I have them. I hope you enjoy.

 

Lilac bush, original Dining Room door on left, door to Grandpa’s apartment on right, my bedroom window at the top

 

Alfred Peabody Guion, (Lad, my Dad), in front of Lilac bush circa 1950’s

 

Grandpa and Smokey in 1945, showing original window of Dining Room on left, the door to Grandpa’s apartment on right

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special Picture # 335 – Trumbull House – Then and Now – Side Yard – 1945 – 2018

Recently I spent a night in the Trumbull House visiting with Paulette – Aunt Chiche to family and friends – and took quite a few pictures. For the next few Saturdays I will be posting pictures taken during this stay as well as older pictures of similar places taken over the years, when I have them. I hope you enjoy.

One of my bedroom windows in the attic

Similar view, maybe in the 1970’s

Martin and Flor Williams, Lad’s friends from Venezuela, 1945

Lad and Smokey, 1945

Tomorrow, in My Ancestors, I’ll be highlighting Alfred Beck Guion, Grandpa’s Father.

Next week, we’ll return to 1943, when Lad and Marian’s story begins.

Judy Guion

 

Special Picture # 334 – Trumbull House – Then and Now – Living Room Door – 1947 – 2018

Recently I spent a night in the Trumbull House visiting with Paulette – Aunt Chiche to family and friends – and took quite a few pictures. For the next few Saturdays I will be posting pictures taken during this stay as well as older pictures of similar places taken over the years, when I have them. I hope you enjoy.


Living Room Door – 2018

 

Marian feeding Douglas near door in original Dining Room – Christmas, 1947

Tomorrow, My Ancestors – Anna Charlotta (Westlin) Pebody, wife of Kemper Foster Pebody.

Next week I’ll begin posting letters written in 1946. Both Lad and Dick are at home in Trumbull with their wives, Ced is still in Alaska, Dan and Paulette await the arrival of their bundle of joy and Dave expects to start his homeward journey soon. Grandpa can’t wait.

Judy Guion

 

 

My Ancestors (1) – Kemper Foster Peabody – 1861-1933

I recently read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intriqued. I decided to take up the challenge. I’m starting with my Great-Grandfather, Kemper Foster Peabody. Next Sunday, I’ll compose a post about his wife, Anna Charlotta (Westlin) Peabody. I hope you enjoy reading about my ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Kemper Foster Peabody, (2) Arla Mary (Peabody) Guion, (3) Alfred Peabody Guion, (4) Judith Anne Guion.

Kemper Foster Peabody, about 1886

Kemper Peabody was born at Plymouth, Wisconsin, August 2, 1861, one of 12 children. He attended Shattuck Military School, Faribault, Minn. He married Anna Charlotta Westlin, (born at Ostersund, Jemptland, Sweden, on May 13, 1865), at Wagon Landing, Wisconsin, on June 26, 1889. Their first son, Burton Westlin, was born in Dunbar Township, North Dakota.

He was a civil engineer and a member of the second Legislative Assembly of North Dakota from 1891-2. He was commissioned under the General Land Office to appraise the Fort Rice Military Reservation from 1892-3. He then was the Bank Examiner of the State of North Dakota, from 1894-5. Their first daughter, my Grandmother, Arla  Mary, was born in Sandoun, North Dakota, February 9, 1892.

He surveyed for the construction of the Duluth and Iron Range Railroad from Tower to Ely, Minnesota, while employed by the Chicago Great Western Railroad in construction work from 1897 to 1901. Four more children, Kemper Francis and Helen Perry, were born in North Dakota, and Anne Westlin and Laurence Kane were born in Iowa, during this time.

In 1901 he came to New York for the New York Central Railroad as Building Inspector in the Engineering Department; he was General Foreman, Maintenance of Way Department, from 1902 – 9. Their youngest daughter, Dorothy Westlin, was born in Mount Vernon, New York. He became Assistant Supervisor of Bridges and Buildings from 1909 – 17.

During this time, he and his family attended the Church of the Ascension in Mount Vernon, New York. My Grandfather, Alfred Duryee Guion, and his family also went to that church. One memorable Christmas, the church held a Pageant and Arla was chosen to play the part of the Virgin Mary. My grandfather wrote in his Reminiscences:

         Arla Mary Peabody and her father, Kemper Peabody c. 1911

“That night as I watched her holding the child with tender contentment and a placid, dreamy look in her soft brown eyes, something inside me suddenly exploded. I had read about “love at first sight”, but this wasn’t first sight. Here was a girl I had known and seen for several years, but apparently I had not seen her at all. This couldn’t be the same girl! Had I been blind! Here was the most enchanting person anywhere in the world. I didn’t know what had happened to me. I was in a daze. I didn’t dare speak to her: she was too far above me. All I could think of on my way home was how I could be worthy of even speaking to her.”

Alfred and Arla were married on March 27, 1913. As the family increased in size with the births of Alfred (Lad), Daniel and Cedric, they decided it was time to have a house of their own. Grandpa continues in his Reminiscences:

“We finally decided on the lot in Larchmont Gardens, and with the money I had saved, I bought one of the first “redi-cut” homes on the market and with the help of my father-in-law, who was Construction Superintendent on the N.Y. Central, aided by one of his workmen on his free days, the house was erected.”

By this time, Kemper Peabody held the position of Supervisor of Piers and Buildings from 1917 – 25. He was General Supervisor of Buildings on the New York Central Lines east of Buffalo from 1925 until his death on Sept. 26, 1933.

Source: The Ancestry of Franklin Merriam Peabody, Collected and made into this book as a mark of affection by his grandfather, Franklin Asbury Merriam, 1929.

Tomorrow, I’ll begin a week of letters written in 1944, when all five boys are serving Uncle Sam.

Judy Guion