Trumbull – Dear Ced (2) – Moom Pitchers and Exotic Orchids – January, 1942

This is the rest of a letter I first posted yesterday from Grandpa to Ced, the only son away from home now, but that is about to change.

Blog - 2015.05.13 - Trumbull (2) - Moom Pitchers and Exotic Orchids - Jan., 1942

 

Page 2     1/11/1942

Time out for a message from Dan who has just come in and wants to say something to you about taking 1/2pictures. Here’s Dan.

Cedirk, dear,

I don’t rightly know why fayther wrote 1/2pictures unless he feels that our results are only 1/2lf satisfactory, which is what I aim to tell you. The moom pitchers we took show an unfortunate tendency toward over-exposure on one edge and not on the other! Lad says changing over at twenty-five feet, taking out the film…… says it probably becomes loose on the real, allowing the light to penetrate. Solution: change film only in very subdued light and do not allow the film to loosen on the real.

Uncle Sam feels that he needs me to save the world for Roosevelt, especially since the dirty stinking yellow bastards have the idiotic nerve to grab the U.S. property called the Philippines after we went to so much trouble to save them from the nasty old Spaniards a few decades ago. Imagine their wanting to get some islands that don’t even belong to them! And they even talk of invading the U.S., just because we refused to sell them a few little staples like iron and machinery and raw materials and because we stopped buying a little silk from them!

Of course we could easily win the war if we just sent 10 more bombers to the Dutch….You can’t expect little countries like U.S. and England to beat Japan without some help. That is why the Dutch have to sink two extra Jap ships for every one they sink for themselves….one for us, one for England. If things get worse, maybe Joe Stalin can withdraw his troops from Berlin long enough to help the Dutch win our war.

Gawd! When I think of those filthy Japs having the nerve to Bomb our Navy! They are nothing but savages. And they even sink our freighters. But we will get even. We are going to start building guns and things and in about 10 years we are going to say to the Dutch and Ciang Kai Shek, “O.K., boys, we’ll take a round out of those little yellow Aryans!” And then they’ll be sorry. Of course, there won’t be anything left in U. S. by that time except taxes, but we will get those cowardly Mongolians! We’ll just take their little trousers down and paddle their pink rising suns.

New topic: When I left Anchorage I made several promises to keep the boys posted about how I made out with the Army. I have failed to do so, but there is still time. Meanwhile, if you see Fred Crowl or Don Tyree, or Hal Reherd, or any of the Air Base boys, tell them I tried valiantly, but the Anchorage draft board tried harder, so into the Army I go, perhaps to fertilize some exotic orchid in the jungles of Sumatra, or fill out the lean feathers of some scrawny African buzzard….saving America, of course, from the Japs, the Huns, and the Wops, every one of whom have only one aim in life….to make every U.S. citizen into a slave.

Dan

ADG - Grandpa about 1945 or 1946 near a tree in winter

Page 3    1/11/1942

The speed limit on the Merritt Parkway has been reduced to 40 miles with the threefold purpose of saving tires, gas and lives.

What Dan means by moom pictures I leave it to you to guess but it does give me a chance to remark “don’t laugh at others mistakes, the banana peel may be under your own foot”.

Don Whitney has received his summons to appear before the draft board for physical examination so how long he will be figuring the profits and losses for the Stratfield is anyone’s guess. The Laufer’s have not heard from Erwin since he reached the Pacific coast. Dick Christie I understand has been down with pneumonia but is getting along nicely. It is reported that Jack Philmon tried to join the Marines but was turned down.

Meigs new store at the corner of Main and Wall – – where the A & P Market used to be – – is now just about completed and they will probably move about the 1st of February. Their old building I understand will be torn down for a new Woolworth store. There has also been a new building erected opposite Read’s where the parking lot used to be and I understand Singer’s will erect a new building near the corner of Fairfield and Broad between the old telephone building and where the church used to stand. The old building back of my office has been torn down and the space thus provided has been turned into a parking lot for customers and employees of the Bridgeport Peoples Savings Bank. So, when that glad day comes when you will be back in this neck of the woods again you will see quite a few changes in the old burgh.

As you may discern there is evidence of my news fund tapering out and inquiries of Dick and Dan not resulting in any fresh spurt to my imagination, if such it can be called, leaves me the sad alternative of bringing this momentous epistle to a close, with the usual hope that the coming week will again bring a letter with more news from my Alaskan pilot.

Give that jovial old pal of mine, Rusty, greetings from his old sidekick, and tell him to write me as soon as he gets any interesting news.

DAD

 

Saturday and Sunday, more Special Pictures.

Next week, I’ll be posting letters written in 1945, when all of Grandpa’s boys are “In The Army Now”.

Judy Guion

Dear Away-From-Homers – Dan Lands in England – August, 1943

We now know that Dan is in England, enjoying the country but missing various personal items. Grandpa sends them off post-haste. We still haven’t heard from Dick, but Lad is expected to leave on his furlough in a few days, Does he make it home?

Trumbull Conn.   August 29, 1943

Dear Away-From-Homers:

Daniel (Dan) Beck Guion

Daniel (Dan) Beck Guion

The outstanding letter (in fact the only one) this week was a V-mail letter from Dan. I quote in full: “The big news of the moment is our safe arrival in jolly old England. Thus far I have found the trip, the old world atmosphere, the scenery, the people, all delightfully adequate from the point of view of the traveler, but several unfortunate misrepresentations have caught us quite unprepared. Before we left the states we were instructed to dispose of sundry articles, with the assurance that ’you won’t be needing those where you’re going!’ and ‘you can get plenty of that when we get over there.’ So instead of a long letter of gripping news, the first letter becomes a brazen touch! My most urgent request is for Kleenex or ”a reasonable facsimile thereof”. The paper shortage here is critical. Next,  I want six Navy style undershirts (1/4 length sleeves), medium-size. Less important (but desirable) are candy and chewing gum. Also dental floss. I’ll write again soon. Dan. The letter was dated August 13th  and arrived here on the 24th .

By noon of the day the letter was received, Dan, there was, on its way to you, a box containing each and every item enumerated above. The only items I had difficulty in securing were the candy and chewing gum because those stores that carry them at all now will sell only “one to a customer”, the reason being that the majority of all candy and chewing gum being made is sent to the boys in service. However, by making a store by store canvas I was able to obtain a dozen or so which I had Meigs (where I bought the shirts) pack in the same box with the other items in order to make one shipment. I would like, for the sake of future guidance, to know how long it takes, and whether it arrives in good condition, and any other shipping advice which experience in this case seems advisable. Now remains a letter from Dick, and if he too can give us some hints of things desired it will be a great help in sending him a delayed birthday gift.

I hope, Lad, the earthquake reported this morning is having occurred in your bailiwick has not shaken your determination to leave on the expected date. We are just living

Jean Mortensen Guion

Jean Mortensen Guion

now in the hope of seeing you soon. Jean has spent all yesterday afternoon and practically the whole day today giving the living room a thorough Mortensen cleaning and has re-arranged things so it looks very attractive. She has some other ideas about rugs, slipcovers, etc., which will still further improve the appearance of things so we won’t feel like apologizing when anyone comes.

Barbara (Plumb, Dan’s girlfriend) starts noon Tuesday from New Haven for Daytona Beach to begin her basic training, as any course she might elect would require this anyway. She doesn’t know how long this will take nor what it will lead to. Jean Hughes, I understand, is home and Chet Hayden is expected to bring a patient north followed by a few days home. They will then both go back to the small town where he is stationed in Georgia, near Atlanta, which they don’t like very much.

Jane Mantle has left for Annapolis where she expects to be married to Charlie Hall Tuesday, following the graduation exercises, where he becomes an Ensign. And speaking of marriages, I have just tied three knots this last week. Thank heavens none of the ladies wore ragweed as bridal bouquets. A wedding is nothing to sneeze about.

Feverishly yours,

DAD

Tomorrow, we’ll continue the story of the Guion boys, wherever they happen to be, and we may hear about Lad’s trip. Pass this blog address to anyone who lived during this timeframe, or someone you think ought to know about life in the 40’s here at home during World War II.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Sons: (and daughters Jean and Paulette) (1) – News From Jean (and Dick) – September, 1945

Trumbull, Conn., September 23, 1945

Dear Sons:      (and daughters Jean and Paulette)

Well, things have been running along here in their accustomed way. More of the boys are coming home with H.D.’s. Barbara (Plumb), I understand, has already sailed for home. Rationing is easing a bit. Gas, meat, canned goods, fuel are all easier. A few civilian goods long way off the market are beginning to appear, but strikes are mentioned more and more frequently in the daily papers – – labor demanding higher wages which of course will inadvertently result in a raise in prices and thus the vicious spiral starts again, inflation in the offing.

Lad’s 30-day furlough is practically up. He and Marian start out in the car tomorrow for Devens (Ft. Devens, Massachusetts), the idea being that if his leave is extended, as one newspaper report said was going to be done on the authority of Gen. Henry, then perhaps they can drive back together. On the other hand, if Lad has to go back from there to Aberdeen, as was the original intention, then Marian will drive back alone and we will then wait to hear from Lad as to what the Army’s future plans are for him. Personally, I do not expect they will send him to the Pacific area where the rest of his outfit is now and where he would be, if he had not gone to Dan’s wedding and thereby “missed the boat”. This week they toured New England, visiting the old Lake Winnipesaukee island of fond memories. No one is inhabiting it now but the cottage on the shore has been rebuilt. They visited Ingrid and Anna in Melrose and saw Lars Erik. They then toured through the White Mountains (Mt. Washington, the Notches, etc.), and Sunday reached St. Albans where they found Larry, Marian and Alan on a visit, then to Colchester and Burlington (unable to locate Fred), crossed Champlain on the ferry (remember the big pig?), Ausable Chasm, Saratoga (which they reached too late to look up the Osbournes) and home. Last night they had a final blowout in New York and right now Marian is doing some ironing and Lad is wrapping up packages to send to Dan with some clothes that Paulette needs and which I shall try to get off this week.

A letter from Jean (bless her heart) Correction. Letter is signed “Dick and Jean”, but if so, Dick’s handwriting has changed quite a bit – – must be the Portuguese influence. Anyway the letter says: “First of all, Dad, I want to wish you a belated birthday wish from Dick and myself. I meant to write sooner so it would reach you on your birthday, but I just didn’t get around to it. Poor excuse, isn’t it! “Happy Birthday” just the same, Dad, and we’ll be thinking of you. Dick sent you a box of cigars. Did they reach you on time? (Yes, thank you.) Well, Dick and I have been two very busy people this past week. We went two dances, a party, two movies and a USO show. That accounts for six of the days and the other one we entertained the Polish couple at our home! We had lots of fun but this week we’re going to try to get home early and catch up on some of our sleep. By the way, we’ve been gadding about since I got here. You’d think we were trying to make up for two years of separation in a few weeks. We aren’t – – it’s just that everything happens at once. It’s a lot of fun but a little tiring after a while. We haven’t had any pictures taken of our little house yet but as soon as we do, will send some to you. Dick’s assistant said he’d take some for us but he hasn’t had a chance to come out yet. I have a camera and films in my trunk but it is still someplace between here and New York. By the time it gets here, we’ll probably be ready to go home. That’s the Army for you – – slow motion.

The base is closing. They say everyone will be out of here by the end of the year. The fellows with the highest amount of points leave first, than the ones who have two years or more of overseas service – – that includes Dick, and he’s not sure he will go because I’m here. He wants to go home but he’d rather stay at this base than one in the states. They aren’t very strict so it’s really wonderful. We really don’t know what will happen, so you may be seeing us soon, or it may be a few more months. As you already know, you can’t depend on the Army. The fellows who have only a few months overseas will be sent to another base in this wing. All this business about the base closing has us in kind of a stew, though, we have two rooms of furniture that Dick bought and would like to sell it before we leave. Once Dick gets his orders we won’t have much time. Then again, if we were going to stay, we want to get a refrigerator. There is just no way of telling what’s going to happen so I guess we’ll just hang on to our furniture and continue eating at the base. Gosh, I’ll be so glad when this Army life is over and we will know what we can do. I’d like to ask another favor of either you or Marian. Would you take my beige wool dress and my green spring coat, that I sent home from Florida, to the cleaners?                                    Jean (and Dick)

Tomorrow and Wednesday, I’ll be posting the rest of this letter. Thursday and Friday will be the two parts of a Birthday Letter to Dave.

Judy Guion

 

Trumbull – A Birthday Letter to 31324665 – August, 1943

Trumbull Conn.  August 15, 1943

Dear 31324665:

THAT, dear children, may be just a number to you, but translated into Uncle Sam Army language it spells Richard Procrastinator Guion, the middle name having been earned at birth and as far as correspondence to the home front is concerned, has been reaffirmed weekly since that time with an Ivory Soap score – 99 and 44/100% pure, (In view of my chosen profession I just have to get in these little advertising ideas in my correspondence, you know).

Is that, you may well ask, the approved method of having a letter addressed to one? No, NO, perish the thought! It isn’t even in spite of that fact. But by this time you may have guessed. In just a few days now we will celebrate a birthday but it will be a party without the main guest. We can’t even send him greetings, much less a gift because we don’t know in what corner of the globe he is hiding from Adolph. So we have unanimously adopted the theme song for the occasion: ”I Can’t Give You Anything But Love, Baby”. Of course there is lots of that from each and all of us, although we know full well it won’t buy baby a new pair of pants.

What a lot of accumulated celebration we will have to celebrate when this mess is finally settled. Now, there’s a thought. What is your prescription for a suitable method of rendering due honor to the occasion? How about that auto trip down to Mexico and Central America with enough cars to accommodate the whole family, with Lad and Dan as official interpreters? Ced could entertain and charm the natives with imitations of Bradley Kincaid, Dick and Jean might do a rumba or two, Dave would probably make a beeline for the best looking native girls, while I could profitably employ my time sniffing the native flora to see if it produces I hay fever sneeze.

Incidentally, I read recently an article on how nearly completed this Pan-American road was south of Mexico City, and ran across the following incident: the advanced survey party sometimes encountered situations for which neither engineering texts nor guidebooks had any solution. The disappearing surveyor’s stakes are a good example. In the rural sections, clear, straight-grained, sawed wood is in great demand to patch chairs, to reinforce plows and for 1000 other purposes. The surveyor’s stakes of clean new wood, 1 1/2 in. square by 14 inches long, driven into the ground 100 feet apart to mark the route of the highway, were a treasure trove to the country people who pulled up at night all the stakes placed during the day. Both U.S. and native engineers explained often and at length that the markers were necessary. The people listened, nodded, and the next morning the stakes were gone again. After all, if the yanqui senores valued the little pieces of wood so highly, why would they stick them in the ground and go away and leave them? Gringo foolishness. Finally one of the engineers hit upon the simple idea of nailing a short piece to each stake just below the top at right angles, making a cross. Not a stake disappeared from that day until the end of the survey.

Jean has a new name for me – “Marryin’ Sam”. This week, one marriage at my office, the week before, two; the week before that also two. It all came about in this way. I usually have my ad in the yellow section in the back of the Bridgeport phone directory. A few weeks ago when the salesman called for a renewal for the new edition, I happened to notice that in the New Haven directory several names appeared under the heading “Justice of The Peace”. I told him they could include my name under that heading in Bridgeport, thinking of course, the other Bridgeport “justices” would be included, but when the darn thing appeared a few weeks ago, low, like Abou Ben Adam (May his tribe increase) my name not only led all the rest, but, believe it or not, it was the only name under that heading in the yellow section. So, if the angle of incidence maintains (I have to get these engineering boys into thinking their Dad is not a back number) I may accumulate enough fees to pay the expenses on that Central American tour above referred to.

And speaking of marriages, this week, at the Trumbull Church, Jacqueline French was united in holy wedlock to Mr. John J. Schwarz, son of the Bridgeport lumber dealer. No wisecracks now about little chips off the old block, etc.

I want an answer from someone, Dan or Dick, regarding the Chevrolet out in back. I think it belongs to Dan although Dick may have made some arrangement with Dan about it. Anyway, it is not doing anyone any good standing out unused month after month. I have asked Harry Burr to give me a figure on how much it will cost to fix it up in running condition, and then, depending on the owner’s wishes, I will try to sell it or keep it against the time you boys return and want a car to run around in (and they are getting very scarce now in the East). Please, one of you write me about it.

Dave and some of the boys that forgather in the Clubhouse in the barn have an idea they can fix the old Waverley Electric car up to run either by battery or with a motorcycle motor and have been busy today working on it. I am adopting a “show me” attitude on whether they can accomplish their purpose or not.

For some years now, we have been needing a feminine touch around these here diggins’ and it looks very much as though Jean is the answer to this long felt need. She spent most of the day improving the appearance of the music room, with a bit of help from me, and the result is something to write away about. So we are profiting by Jean’s homemaking instinct, and this is fair warning now that the rest of you will have a high standard to match in presenting me with any other daughters-in-law.

The supper call is about to sound, so I’ll bring this peculiar birthday letter to a close with many good wishes to my boy “who wears a pair of silver wings”, with many happy returns of the day from all of us and most earnest hope that next August 19th there will be no empty chairs around the table as we sit down to celebrate the occasion. So, Dick old son, here’s more love than you know from your old

DAD

Tomorrow, the final two posts from the autobiography of Mary E Wilson. Enjoy the final chapter of this inspirational story and the photo album on Sunday.

Next week,  I’ll be posting letters from 1945. Dan and Paulette are still trying to figure out what their final plans will be. Grandpa continues to write to his sons who are still far from home. Dan is in France, Ced is still in Alaska and Dick is in Brazil. Lad is on the east coast, presently on furlough from Aberdeen Proving Grounds – the place where his Army adventure began – and getting ready to go back, but unsure of actual plans.

Judy Guion

 

 

Trumbull – Dear Sonny: (That Means YOU) – Ced’s “Statement of Views” – August, 1943

In this week’s letter, Grandpa admits that he doesn’t have much local news to share so he includes excerpts from letters he’s received from his sons who are scattered around the country. We hear from both Lad and Ced.

Trumbull Conn,      August 8, 1943

Dear Sonny:   (That means YOU)

In one of Washington Irving’s delightful little essays (from The Sketch Book, I think) there is a fanciful tale of authors whose principal writings consist of thefts from the works of others. As I sit down this afternoon to do my weekly stint, there seems to be so little news to relate that most of this letter will probably consist of extracts from letters received from Lad and Ced – – no word having yet reached us from the other progeny, presumably en route to axe and axis.

You will be interested in Ced’s “Statement of Views:  “I still wish we had been able to avoid this war, but as one looks back now, it seems as though the groundwork for the present conflict was laid in the peace settlements of the previous war. Although diplomatic action for peace is theoretically best, I see now that things had gone so far by 1940 – 41 for it to work successfully. With this fact so obvious today it is only common sense which leads me to feel that applied military action was the only method which could achieve a favorable condition for a settlement of the worlds and our problems. Therefore, should the Selective Service call me now I would go into it to do the best I could, though not with joy. Allied victory now appears to be the only road to a pleasant and secure future. My fervent hope is that when victory does, past experience will make Allied leaders wiser and thus prevent another bungling of peace terms and postwar adjustments. For myself, I still hate the thought of killing another man, and hate to think of being partly responsible for the suffering which others would have to undergo at my hands, yet when you figure it out, by fighting and winning the war, there are probably fewer people who, in the long run, would have to suffer. All the above leaves me idealistically unchanged but willing to discard some of this idealism temporarily as a means to an end, which it is hoped will make it possible for all to live in a more peaceful and secure state throughout the world.”

Lad says: “I guess I never told you that my camera and all equipment (about $600) and my portable radio were stolen. I sort of miss both things. My car, however, is O.K., except that a couple of weeks ago I had to put in a new front-end ($23) and as soon as I can get $38 more will put in a new clutch.”

Which reminds me, Lad, that the clutch on my Buick seems to be slipping. Is it possible to have it repaired, do you suppose, or will I have to spend $38 also? The opening comments in your letter regarding the difficulty you are having finding a suitable pen leads me quite naturally to ask, “Why do you not use the pen I sent you? Is it lost, stolen or don’t you like it, or didn’t happen to have along with you?”

I want to say right here and now I know I’m going to like Marian. In fact you can tell her for me that she is a girl after my own heart. Besides being attractive and good

Marian Irwin

Marian Irwin

company as you have formerly stated, she is evidently kind, generous and thoughtful of others. Too bad you lost your camera or you might send me a snapshot of her. Your letter also mentions that Junior goes to Maryland in three or four weeks and you will probably get your furlough shortly after. As I figured, that will mean the latter part of August. As soon as you know any more definite date, don’t wait for Marian to suggest your writing to me. What an A-1 birthday present it would be if you could be here on September 11.

Butch and Marty both have Whooping Cough, but because of the inoculation, will get off easy. Grandma and Dorothy are still with us but Grandma expects to get a new pair of glasses Tuesday or Wednesday and will not move to New York until after that happens. Do you remember Harold La Tour? He is back from South America and now is with the daily news.

Ta ta for now.

DAD

Tomorrow, a letter from Lad with details of his life at Camp Santa Anita in California. On Friday, another letter from Grandpa to his sons, filled with the latest news of Trumbull, family and friends.

On Saturday and Sunday, the final two posts from the Autobiography of Mary E Wilson. It has been my pleasure to share this triumphant story with you. Enjoy the Photo Album on Sunday.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Network Stations (2) – New Expectations – September, 1945

This is part 2 of a 4-page letter from Grandpa to all the family members who are scattered around the world at the end of the war. Lad has made it home but he is the only one, so far.

And Internationalist Dan writes way back on August 25th, by regular, not airmail, “Mail service is immensely improved— 5 to 6 days by airmail. Thus I am answering your August 19th letter today; and a rather amusing situation it is too, reading your account of how the war ended in Trumbull, because over here it is not yet official although we are convinced that the formality alone is lacking. But the spontaneity of celebration seems to have suffered an even greater blow than that of VE day because of rumors and preliminary reports. No tolling of bells, no blowing of horns, no demonstration of any kind has marked the end of the war, in Drancy, although I understand that the Yanks in downtown Paris cut up a bit on 16th of Aug. I am excited at the prospect of Lad’s getting home so unexpectedly. If only it is true! And if only I had known! Speaking of getting home, I hope you can send me those articles for Paulette as soon as possible because I might be leaving soon. She will not be able to leave for a matter of months because she must wait for an immigration visa from Philadelphia. Also if pregnant (which seems definite) she might be prohibited from sailing on any Army transport until the child is three months old. There is always the alternative of civilian transportation but waiting lists are long and space is limited. It seems that we must just make the best of it. While I remain in

Page 3    6/16/45

France it is feasible to send parcels but whether or not it will be possible after I leave I cannot say. So please don’t wait for the fall and winter catalog. Enclosed are two belated letters, one to Marian and the other to Jean that Chiche wrote last May. They were mailed to me while I was in Maastricht but were returned to Calais undelivered. We are both excited about the “expectations”. Chiche asks if it is possible to buy wool in America. She wants six lobs of wool, two each of pink, light blue and white. Our Army program is undergoing the throes of reorganization. We are hoping to get a good educational program started and perhaps I can take the Paris University course. It looks now as if I might get home in November or December. If you get a chance, please write a letter of thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Rabet, 5 rue Cuvier, Drancy, Seine, France. They have given us (Chiche and I) every form of hospitality imaginable and will not accept any money for it. I manage to find small presents for them such as cigarettes and soap but I feel very much in debt to them. Most of their food is bought on the black market because the legal ration is too slim. They particularly miss meat. If you can find any kind of canned meat or fish, please send it.

(Cease quotes. Red dropped in a while ago to see Lad, who is at present touring New England with his wife, and was accompanied by his fiancée, Geraldine Fisher. He asked me if I had seen the Bpt. Herald headline which read: “Corp. Sirene wins Syracuse belle”. He said Jack Filman and Bill Palmer were fresh out of the service and that Barbara Plumb was expected home in November. Resume quote)

Tomorrow, I’ll post the final segment of this letter.

On Saturday and Sunday, we’ll check in on Mary and Archie Wilson and their move to Trumbull.

Judy Guion

Army Life – Marian’s Influence – July, 1943

(Please look at yesterday’s post, https://greatestgenerationlessons.wordpress.com/2017/04/27/trumbull-a-page-from-the-book-of-trumbull-personalities-july-1943-2/,  for some additional information on the Rev. Elijah Guion, the Episcopal Priest at St. Paul’s, in New Orleans, during the Civil War.)

Lad finally finds time between teaching classes and socializing to write home a little more than a quick telegram.

South Pasadena Hospitality Center

July 27, 1943

Dear Dad:

This pen is no good – time out while I look for another. Time in. Not much better, but at least it doesn’t force as many holes in the paper. Another, and this seems to be the best here.

This letter you can lay to Marian’s influence. It has been hot (to everyone else “terrifically hot“) and we were just dancing. We stopped because of the uncomfortable temperature down here and she made me promise to write. The rules in effect here state that the hostesses may not leave the premises in the company of any man in the

Marian Irwin and Lad Guion - 1943

Marian Irwin and Lad Guion – 1943

services, so she has gone out to sit on the lawn and cool off – and here am I, doing something I should have done three weeks ago.

As I cabled, I have been and am fine, and apparently California agrees with me. Quite frequently it reminds me of South America.

The bathing suit arrived okay, thanks, but it was addressed to company “A”, instead of “D”, which caused a few days delay, but I’ve had no chance to use it yet. But if tomorrow is as hot as today, I expect to try to find a spot in the pool here in South Pasadena.

Sunday, with Marian as company, I finally got to Santa Anita Army Air Base, where Larry Sieck, one of the fellows I met in South America, is stationed. He arrived five or six weeks ago and I’ve tried each weekend to get there. It is only 35 miles away – he is well and we spent a quiet Sunday afternoon discussing the Army and South America.

That was quite a trip you made, but I can imagine just how disappointed you must’ve been upon finding that Dan had departed. But I’m very glad you took the bull by the horns, and continued in the eventually successful hunt. I’m sorry to hear that both Dan and Dick have shipped or will shortly. I would have liked to talk to both of them before departure. Things here still look fairly hopeful, but you can never tell at what moment something may happen. I hope that no one tries any treachery until after my furlough, if they intend to try at all.

I never told you, I guess, that my camera and all equipment (about $600) and my portable radio were stolen. I sort of miss both things. My car, however, is O.K., except that a couple of weeks ago I had to put in a new front-end since it was beyond adjustment ($23) and as soon as I can get $38 more, I’ll put in a new clutch.

Art Lind is home in Washington state, on a furlough at present, and Vic has been sent to Oregon State College for a years study in Electrical Engineering. Junior is going to Maryland in three or four weeks on his furlough, and I shall, I hope, be along right after him.

We have had nothing but sunshine out here, now, since sometime in February, and since Friday, it has been quite warm, close to the 100° mark.

Monday, yesterday, I was assigned to a course called “Engine Tuneup” which I don’t like to well, but I’m still hoping to get that Diesel Principles course going. When that happens, I’ll be satisfied for a short while, anyway.

Well Dad, good luck and my love to everyone.

Lad

The following was mailed to Lad at Camp Santa Anita. It is from The University of Southern California, Engineering, Science, and Management War Training Program, certifying that Alfred Peabody Guion has satisfactorily completed the war training course in INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE TESTING, dated July 19, 1943.  

Tomorrow I’ll continue the story of the early married life of Archie and Mary Wilson.

Next week, I’ll be posting letters written in 1945. Dan and Paulette are finally married but they don’t get to see much of each other.

Judy Guion