Army Life – Dear Dad – Tentative Plans for Marian – July 10, 1944

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Monday –

Pomona, Calif

7/10/1944

Dear Dad –

Thanks a million for your very nice letter that we received from you last week. Wish I could report some definite plans that the “Roving Guions” have made, but so far everything is still very much up in the air. We might be here two days, two weeks or even two months – we just don’t know. However, we have tried to make a few tentative plans – subject to an immediate change, if necessary.

  1. If it is at all possible I am going to drive the Buick, by way of Orinda, back east to our new destination. (Where??? When ???) We have received permission from the C.O. to get gasoline for the trip, but so far have not applied for it.
  2. I would love to come and stay at Trumbull – I really love it there and can think of no nicer place that I would like to be. Theoretically, you are not supposed to apply for gasoline for a move any oftener than once every six months, so I may be with you longer than you anticipated. In that case, I would probably get a job in Bridgeport. It remains to be seen just what will happen, but maybe I’ll have a chance to spend a winter where it snows yet!
  3. One of the other wives is planning on going east with me, and before we get started, there may be more. But at least, I know I’ll have company and although both of us would rather have our husbands along, Ruth and I have a lot of fun together so it should be a pleasant trip.

That’s the best we can do in the way of plans so far, and any changes or later developments we will report immediately.

The camera arrived safely, Dad. Thanks for sending it to us.

You are a peach for offering to increase our “budget” with another loan. Even though we don’t believe that we will need it, it is nice to know that we can call on you in case of dire necessity.

With two such recommendations as yours and David’s, we decided that we must see “Between Two Worlds” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Between_Two_Worlds_(1944_film)), so we went yesterday. It was a very unusual picture, wasn’t it? We both enjoyed it very much.

Lad is still at Camp Haan, and although he gets home for dinner every night, this business of getting up at four o’clock every morning is no fun. We hope that he will be transferred back to Pomona in a few days so he can get a little more sleep in the mornings.

Thought perhaps we would have a check for you in this letter, but Uncle Sam has not come through as yet, so we are using the allotment check to live on for the time being. Maybe next time, Dad.

With all our love to everyone –

As always,

Marian and Lad

Tomorrow, another letter from Marian about getting ready for the move – to where and when still a big question. On Saturday, another installment of Marian’s Grandfather’s (John Jackson Lewis) Voyage to California in 1851. On Sunday, more about the Rev. Elijah and Clara Guion’s life with their children after  leaving New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Judy Guion

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Voyage to California (27) – John Jackson Lewis – January to March, 1851

(1) John Jackson Lewis, (2) Edith May (Lewis) Rider, (3) Marian Faith (Rider) Irwin, (4) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion, (5) Judith Anne Guion.

The following are transcriptions of John Jackson Lewis’s diary and journal of his voyage to California in 1851. He was travelling  from New York to visit his older brother William in San Jose.

Diary

Day clear and pleasant.  In sight of the coast part of the day.  A gambler on board opened a monte bank in the steerage cabin last evening and was reported to have made $75 by his operation.  Distance 205 miles.

Journal

Nothing remarkable to note of this days occurrences, in sight of the coast part of the day, pleasant weather, and 205 miles accomplished, being the chief events.  The monte banker plied his trade again in the evening, and, as one who played with him and lost by him informed me, made about $100.  A number of the passengers are quite dissatisfied at such proceedings being permitted on board.

I will continue this story next Saturday.

Tomorrow, I’ll be posting more information about the Rev. Elijah and Clara Guion and their daughter’s marriages. 

Next week, I will continue this story at the very beginning with Reminiscences of Alfred D. Guion, my Grandfather’s memories of growing up in Mount Vernon, New York in the 1880’s and 1890’s. 

Judy Guion

Voyage to California (26) – John Jackson Lewis – January to March, 1851

(1) John Jackson Lewis, (2) Edith May (Lewis) Rider, (3) Marian Faith (Rider) Irwin, (4) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion, (5) Judith Anne Guion.

The following are transcriptions of John Jackson Lewis’s diary and journal of his voyage to California in 1851. He was travelling  from New York to visit his older brother William in San Jose.

Diary

Cape St. Lucas in sight this morning, weather clear and cool so that a cloth coat could be borne very comfortably all day.  Nearest land at noon, Cape St. Lucas, distant 28 miles.  Distance sales 218 miles.

Journal

Weather clear again this morning, but cool enough to make a coat quite comfortable all day.  The wind is fresh, bracing and invigorating, and makes me feel more like myself again.  Cape St. Lucas has been in sight most of the day, distance at noon 28 miles.  Distance accomplished 218 miles.  Something new introduced into the steerage this evening: this was nothing less than a monte bank.  Some of the passengers and crew bet small sums, but, as is usual I suppose in such cases, the banker was the chief gainer, his process I suppose amounting to some $20 or $30 for the evening’s work.

I will continue this story next Saturday.

Tomorrow, I’ll be posting more information about the Rev. Elijah and Clara Guion and their daughter’s marriages. 

Next week, I will continue this story at the very beginning with Reminiscences of Alfred D. Guion, my Grandfather’s memories of growing up in Mount Vernon, New York in the 1880’s and 1890’s. 

Judy Guion

Voyage to California (25) – John Jackson Lewis – January to March, 1851

(1) John Jackson Lewis, (2) Edith May (Lewis) Rider, (3) Marian Faith (Rider) Irwin, (4) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion, (5) Judith Anne Guion.

The following are transcriptions of John Jackson Lewis’s diary and journal of his voyage to California in 1851. He was travelling  from New York to visit his older brother William in San Jose.

Diary

The apprehensions entertained of stormy weather have not been realized.  The day has been cloudy, but the sea is not rougher than usual.  At noon observation we were Lat.  20° 40’ n.  Lon.  107° 11’ w.  —- miles distant from Cape Corientes, which is the nearest land. Dis. 133 ½ miles.

Journal

The apprehensions of rough weather felt last evening have not been verified.  The day has been cloudy with a slight sprinkle of rain occasionally, (the first of the kind for a considerable time), but the wind has not been high, and the water is comparatively smooth.  The observation at noon informed us that we were in latitude 20° 40’ N. longitude, 107° 11’ W.,  Nearest land Cape Corientes, distant 90 miles; distance accomplished since yesterday’s observation 118 ½ miles.

I will continue this story next Saturday.

Tomorrow, I’ll be posting more information about the Rev. Elijah and Clara Guion and their family in New Orleans.

Next week, I will begin this story at the very beginning with Reminiscences of Alfred D. Guion, my Grandfather’s memories of growing up in Mount Vernon, New York in the 1880’s and 1890’s. 

Judy Guion

Voyage to California (24) – John Jackson Lewis – January to March, 1851

(1) John Jackson Lewis, (2) Edith May (Lewis) Rider, (3) Marian Faith (Rider) Irwin, (4) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion, (5) Judith Anne Guion.

The following are transcriptions of John Jackson Lewis’s diary and journal of his voyage to California in 1851. He was travelling  from New York to visit his older brother William in San Jose.

Diary

To- day there was such a general washing and cleaning up that I lay in my berth most of the day to be out of the way.  A portion of the crew were busy lowering yards and making other preparations for crossing the mouth of the Gulf of California, where rough water is occasionally experienced.  The wind blows quite fresh this evening.  Some kinds of provisions are becoming scarce on board and we have less variety on the steerage table than formerly.  There is consequently some complaint among the passengers.  Distance 205 miles.

Journal

Our crew to day appear to be inspired anew with a spirit of cleaning.  Washing paints, scouring deck, and cleaning generally on the upper deck has occupied almost the entire day, and in consequence, I have passed no inconsiderable portion of it in the very interesting occupation of lying in my birth.  As I can now read a portion of each day, this is more tolerable than formerly.  The wind blows quite fresh this morning, and as we shall be crossing the Gulf of California on the morrow, a still harder blow is anticipated.  The vessel was prepared to- day to meet it, by the lowering of yard-arms, and the tightening of the various parts liable to injury from heavy winds.  Distance to-day 205 miles.

I will continue this story next Saturday.

Tomorrow, I’ll be posting more information about the Rev. Elijah and Clara Guion and their family in New Orleans.

On Monday and Tuesday, the last two Christmas Cards from Grandpa to his friends and family. I’ll post Special Pictures the rest of the week.

Judy Guion

Voyage to California (21) – John Jackson Lewis – January to March, 1851

(1) John Jackson Lewis, (2) Edith May (Lewis) Rider, (3) Marian Faith (Rider) Irwin, (4) Marian Dunlop (Irwin) Guion, (5) Judith Anne Guion.

The following are transcriptions of John Jackson Lewis’s diary and journal of his voyage to California in 1851. He was travelling  from New York to visit his older brother William in San Jose.

Diary

Sailing, to-day, within a few miles of the coast, which appears, generally, very mountainous and rugged. In places the shore slopes off in plains of considerable extent, but is, generally, very abrupt. The vegetation upon it appears, chiefly, to be of a very diversified character. Saw several black-fish to-day. Distance sailed 223 miles, distance from Acapulco 163 miles.

Journal

To day we are coasting along within a few miles of the coast. In some places there is a plain of considerable width next to the coast. A few miles back the ground rises in a collection of small hills; these are succeeded by still higher, and “hills peep o’er hills, and Alps o’er Alps arise,” until clouds seem to rest upon the summits of the mountains far in the interior. The hills are generally dry and barren, in some places covered with a stunted vegetation, and even on the plain, near the coast, the growth does not appear to consist of anything more than mere shrubbery. In other places the hills rise more abruptly from the water’s edge, but are more uniform in their height over the country. Taken altogether, it is a very unpromising-looking land to live upon. Tomorrow is the anniversary of Washington’s birthday, and the men are busy to day cleaning and painting the carriages of their two cannon, cleaning up buckets etc., and the mates are looking over the flags on board, so I suppose we may look for a demonstration on the morrow. Distance last 24 hours 233 miles; distance from Acapulco 163 miles.

Tomorrow, I’ll continue the story of the Rev. Elijah Guion and Clara Maria de los Dolores Marina de Beck Guion as they move south to Louisiana.

On Monday and Tuesday, I’ll post Special Pictures and then, through Christmas Eve, I’ll be posting unique, personalized Christmas Cards designed by Grandpa. The cards were sent to family and friends around the world. Grandpa carried on a tremendous correspondence throughout his life.

.Judy Guion

Army Life – Dear Family – Marian’s Account of Their Furlough – June 18, 1944

Marian Irwin Guion at Trumbull - 1945 (cropped)Sunday

(6/18/44)

Dear family –

Back at Pomona again, with memories of the trip that I wouldn’t exchange for all the gold in the world. To have the chance to meet all of you, and to have Lad there too, means more to me than I could possibly tell you, but I think you understand. Now all I need is to meet the rest of the family in the same kind of pleasant surroundings. I have so very many pleasant and thrilling thoughts about Trumbull and the wonders of “our” family that I should certainly think I could find words to express them, but somehow they just won’t come out. Maybe they are too far down inside me! Anyway, they are there for me to reminisce (spelling???) and remember when things begin to turn blue or topsy-turvy for the time being.

You are right, Dad, about our flitting about meeting so many relatives that we forgot about writing to you. We were going to send you a telegram saying we had arrived safely, but it was three days after our arrival at Orinda before we thought about it. We’re sorry.

We had a very lovely visit with Larry and Marian. They have a lovely place in Milan, and we only wish we could have stayed longer. But time was hurrying by, so we got a train Tuesday morning and left Chicago Tuesday night. Had rain and even snow all the way home (until we reached California, of course!!), so that the train ride wasn’t so dirty, and then had a grand visit with my Mom and Dad. All in all it was a wonderful furlough, and we will talk about it for months to come.

In the excitement of our trip we neglected to mention a few minor details, so here’s where we catch up.

  1. Lad has changed the address of my allotment check (again !!!) so after July you probably won’t be getting them anymore. And incidentally, Dad, if the July one comes to you, would you mail it to us in a long envelope? The government and the banks object if you have any folds in them.
  2. Lad would like to have the address of his Life Insurance Company.
  3. We are enclosing with this letter a gasoline certificate that Lad would like you to give to Dave when he gets home on furlough. (Isn’t it grand that he’s getting their just at graduation time! Wish we could see him!)

I think that is all, Dad, as far as business matters go, except that we want to add an exceptionally grateful thanks a million for sending us the money to help us get home. Dad’s are so wonderful, when, without any complaint or question, they immediately find the cash for various and sundry (not to mention sudden) requests from their offspring for cash – even when it upsets the apple cart quite frequently. But we did appreciate it so very much Dad, and you shall be repaid as soon as possible.

In your last letter you mentioned to Ced that you didn’t think we received a package from him – and that is true. We haven’t! Should we write and tell Ced? He probably thinks we have just neglected to thank him. And it ‘tisn’t so!

Seems to me I’ve rambled on enough, for this time. Lad sent his very best regards and love to all of you. He left tonight for two weeks desert training – not to enthusiastically, either. They are having real war-time conditions there, with gas attacks, blackouts, restrictions, and living in fox-holes. No wonder he’s not too enthusiastic!

With my love to all of you –

As ever,

Marian

P.S. – Dad – you might know we couldn’t get away without leaving something! The movie camera! We think it is in the closet under the stairs. If you find it will you mail it to us, please? Thanks a lot.

M

P.P.S. – We also saw Arnold and Alta (Gibson). They are living in Vallejo for the time being, although Arnold expected to be sent out this week. They came over to see us on Sunday – had dinner with my family – and Lad and Arnold caught up with each other’s pasts. We were very glad to see them both.

Tomorrow, the next installment of the Voyage to California by John Jackson Lewis, written in 1851.

On Sunday, the story of Josephine Cadoret, the mother of Clara Maria de los Dolores Marina de Beck Guion, and quite a story it is.

Judy Guion