Trumbull – My Dear “Poor Dogs” – St. Patrick’s Day – 1946

St. Patrick’s day in the mornin’, 1946

My dear “poor dogs”:

No disrespect intended of course. And besides, it is generally admitted I believe that the dog is man’s best friend, but even this implies designation of you as my best friend is not the meaning I had in mind in the usual salutation. It is rather based on the old childhood saga. When this here Father Hubbard went this week to the mailbox cupboard he found it entirely bare of quotes and so you have none. Q.M.D. of course I might have called you snakes, again in no sense of disrespect but hoping in view of the day that you in turn would be driven out of your respective “islands” and shipped back to the mainland of the U.S. anyway, it is St. Patrick’s Day in the morning here or glancing at my gold watch and chain I see it is but nine A.M. – – an unusually early time for me to be indicting my weekly Clarion, but you see I have already been up hours applying a coat to tar to the laundry roof – – that and the driveway seem to be perennial jobs. And the reason for all this unseemly early morning activity? Well, Friday evening the phone rang and Aunt Anne (Anne Peabody Stanley, Grandma Arla’s younger sister), after the usual inquiry as to the state of my health, thought it might be a good thing if the six of us (Grandpa, Aunt Betty, Lad, Marian, Dick and Jean) should motor down today and visit them at her apartment. I consulted the various oracles and as all the auguries seemed favorable, I gave an affirmative answer and in an hour or so we start for the big city; AND not wanting to let the day go by without the usual letter you have learned to expect on this day, it seemed best to get started with it early, and there you have the whole thing laid bare before you. It took me a long time to say “I’m writing you early because we are going to N. Y. this afternoon”, but I have to fill up the page with words of some sort and news this week is confined to Joe Stalin’s blasts, Winston Churchill’s flowing measures and news of the settlement of the General Motors and General Electric strike settlement.

There is a little of local moment. Paul (Warden, the apartment tenant, along with his wife and two children), with the aid of Walter Mantle, is putting a new wall on the apartment bathroom. Jean went shopping in New York Thursday with Marion Hopkins (one of her objects being to see if, in the big city, she could find some suitable dress material for Paulette, unsuccessfully, I might add). Dick and Jean went horseback riding yesterday morning from the Madison Avenue Sables, it being a beautiful spring day, and later came back and did some cleaning up work around the yard.

Dave, I forgot to mention in last week’s letter that I received a note from Herman R. Semenek of Chicago, enclosing a five dollar bill and asking me to thank you for your trust in him. You will regret to learn that your Alaskan brother Ced has been insulted by the Bridgeport City Trust Co. They read his signature and addressed him thereupon as Pedric D. Tucon. It cannot be that his handwriting is a bit illegible.

Surprise. Dick is up. He just came from this cellar where he has been coaxing the old coal water-heating stove into activity. The oil burner installed eight months ago burned out apart and for several weeks now we have been waiting for the replacement part to arrive. Meanwhile we have sort of a local ration allotment for hot water. Today everyone will want to take baths and get all dolled up before going to visit so the little old stove will be working overtime.

Aunt Betty has just called me into breakfast, so leaving with the hope that the coming week will bring news from Alaska and abroad to liven up next week’s screed, I remain, respected Sirs,

Your doting father

familiarly known as

DAD

Tomorrow and Friday,  I’ll be posting pages 2 & 3 of a letter Grandpa wrote to his far-way family. I did not have a copy of page 1 so I went to my original letters and page 1 is missing from there also. 

Judy Guion

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Trumbull – To My Scattered Flock (1) – January 2, 1944

Trumbull, Conn.  Jan. 2, 1944

To my scattered flock:

There are several matters of import to record in this my first letter of the new year. First, about Grandma. Burton phoned me at the office early in the week to say that his mother was very weak and the doctor had told them she had not many more days before starting out on the great adventure. Might be a week, possibly two weeks, but to be safe and in accordance with Grandma’s wishes, all the children were summoned to her bedside. Thursday, Ced, Jean and I, together with Elizabeth, her two kids, Flora Bushey and Red (Sirene) all went down on the train together. We phoned to Anne from Elsie’s shop and learned that Grandma would like to see us that afternoon, so, Red and Flora having planned to attend some movie, Jean and Ced and I went to Grandma’s while Elizabeth stayed at Anne’s apartment some blocks away with her two children, then Ced and Jean left to meet Red while I went back to Anne’s to amuse the kids while Elizabeth went over to see Grandma. Grandma looks very bad, but is alert and interested in all that goes on. She was interested in reading Marian’s letter and also one from Dan, doing so propped up in bed without the aid of her glasses, too. Physically she is extremely weak, there apparently being a combination of intestinal and liver trouble. Helen was there with Anne. Dorothy had gone to work. Kemper, Marian and Larry had come on but Larry and Marian, with Alan (now 7 years old) had gone to see old friends in New Rochelle and Kemper had gone to Mount Vernon. Before we left Anne’s apartment to come home, Larry phoned from the Grand Central and he and Marian came down and we all had supper together. I neglected to say that Dave had gone down to see Grandma the day before and to my place at the office Thursday, as otherwise I would have had to close up shop.

Two airmail letters from Dan, one in the first part of the week and the other the last day of the old year, sort of ended up 1943 in good style. His first letter mentioned having had a very pleasant Thanksgiving Day with Mr. and Mrs. Heath, of whom he says he has never encountered any people more sincerely generous than the Heaths. He mentions receiving three invitations to Christmas celebrations, but “the old fox is waiting to see which invitation will be most worthwhile”. His second letter describes a short furlough which he spent in a visit to Cornwall in a little town called St. Ives (of Mother Goose fame) and a short distance from Penzance, immortalized by Gilbert and Sullivan’s Pirates. He was guest of a very hospitable elderly retired couple named Burnett who were introduced to him by mail through the kindness of one of the Red Cross workers.

Daniel (Dan) Beck Guion

Dear Dan:

Lt. P. R. Martin, the Censor who usually goes over your letters, felt it his duty to remove the Heath’s address, but he very courteously wrote the following note: “Send the articles to T-5 Guion. Sorry I must cut the address out; however it is of little importance.” Accordingly, I had D. M. Read Company make up a package of bath salts, powder and soap and will get it off to you early in 1944. Are you getting some good movies or Kodachrome pictures or won’t they allow the use of a camera in England? Send me another list of things you want sent, now that we know they arrive, even though somewhat delayed. I think hereafter, that with every package I send you, I shall include some item of cosmetic or toilet article as gifts to those who are so good to you, BUT, please, in every letter make a definite request which I can show the post office as otherwise packages will not be accepted for mailing overseas. We all enjoy your letters very much and it’s so good to know you are well and content.

Tomorrow I’ll post the conclusion of this letter, with notes to Lad and Marian.

On Saturday more Special Pictures of the Trumbull House, Then and Now.

On Sunday, another Guest Post from GPCox about the Women of World War II.

Judy Guion

 

 

Special Picture # 283 – 2000 New York Census

Alfred Beck Guion, Grandpa’s father, passed away on March 2, 1899. A little over a year later, his wife Ella had sold the fancy Lincoln Avenue house and bought a much smaller place on Dell Avenue. Two of her sisters had moved in to help. This was quite a drastic change for Alfred, (Grandpa) only 15 years old. 

The 2000 New York Census – this page was completed on June 6, 2000.

 

This particular section shows Guion, Ella, 69 years old,  head of household, Alfred D, son, 15 years old, student, Elsie M, daughter, 12 years old, student,  Duryee, Lillian, sister, 40 years old, Lizzie, (also known as Aunt Betty) sister, 36 years old.

 

fr: Ella Duryee Guion, Elsie Guion; back: Alfred Duryee Guion, AuntLillian and Aunt Lizzie, also known as Aunt Betty, who came to Trumbull to help with the children after Arla passed away in 1933.

 

 

Special Picture # 268 – The Guion Place, Huguenot Street, New Rochelle, NY

 

This is an artist’s rendition of the Guion House in New Rochelle, New York. built and occupied by Louis Guion, Huguenot, in 1696.(Photo from The Descendants of Louis Guion, Huguenot,  A Guion Family History, compiled by J. Marshall Guion, IV, Edited by Violet H. Guion, Olean, New York, 14760, published in 1976. 

 

Special Picture # 259 – Lad and Marian Guion on a Road Trip – 1945

In the fall of 1945, Lad came home from France and reported to Aberdeen, Maryland. They didn’t quite know what to do with him, so he was given several furloughs. During one of them, he and Marian took a road trip to upstate New York and New Hampshire. These pictures were taken on that trip.

 

 

 

 

Trumbull – Dear Awayoffs (1) – A Trip to New Rochelle – November, 1941

Trumbull, Conn., Nov. 15, 1941

Dear Awayoffs:

Not five minutes ago (it is now a few minutes after nine) we arrived home from a visit to New Rochelle, (New York). Dan had not seen any of the New Rochelle folks since he arrived home, so he decided that as the weather was good, we could, today, make the journey. Lad had been invited to Long Island for dinner, so after our own meal had been consumed, Dan picked up Barbara and then Zeke, Biss and the two kids and off we started, Dan, Barbara, and Aunt Betty in the front seat, Biss, Zeke and myself and the two kids in the back. Almost the entire length of the Hutchinson River Parkway below Portchester is torn up as they are widening it on both sides. Coming back they allow no northbound traffic until Portchester, so we followed the Old Post Road as far as that city.

Helen Human, Anne Stanley, Dorothy Peabody

          Our first stop was Kemper’s. We found that Kemp (Peabody) had been confined to his home the last week with the flu but was intending to go back to work for a short time tomorrow. Later, Burton (Peabody) arrived with Grandma (Peabody) and Aunt Dorothy (Peabody), and after a light tea and conversation of the same tint, we started back home. Dave did not go along with us as he had his Young People’s meeting to attend. We learned that Helen (Peabody Human, Mrs. Ted Human) had left Brownsville (Texas) and gone to Mexico City and had just left there in turn for a plane trip to Guatemala City. Larry (Peabody) and (his wife) Marion are in their new home but are having water trouble and will have to put in a driven well in case they are unable to get city water. Doesn’t that bring back recollections?

This morning about 8:30, I took Aunt Betty over to see Dr. Smith as the nurse thought it wise for her to have a check-up. The doctor said he thought she had made a remarkable recovery. He gave her a tonic to pep her up a bit and improve her appetite.

The C.I.O. has gotten into Producto and it is now a union shop. The wage rate has been raised but working hours reduced so that the boys do not earn any more but do work less hours. Lad thinks he may soon be transferred to a salary basis and given charge of their shipping department. He has just been transferred there from his old job and is being groomed for the new work as the man in charge at present has been ordered by his doctor to take a long rest. Dan has still heard nothing more about his draft status, either from Alaska or Conn., so he is working with the Sword of Damocles hanging over his head. If you don’t know what that is, ask Dick, as he seems to be more or less of a specialist in ancient Greek folk lore.

The ambulance drive went well over the top and they are now about to purchase a fine new gray Cadillac ambulance with all the latest equipment, such as red lights, sirens, stretchers, etc.

“The Good Times” – 1939
Arnold Gibson (Gibby), Charlie Kurtz and Carl Wayne
The Red Horse Station

This is Carl’s last day at the Socony station (at Kurtz’s store). He was moving his stuff today over to the new place and tomorrow Eb Joy takes over. He came in the office the other day and together we doped out a letter to go out to Trumbull folk urging them to buy Socony products.

Helen Burnham is up visiting Peggy. The boys went over to see her last night. Rufus, Louise and David are in Fort Pierce, Fla., where Rufus is managing an apartment house and writing magazine articles on the side. Helen is teaching in a girls school in Massachusetts. Eleanor is at college somewhere and Brad is going to Yale.

Tomorrow I’ll post the second half of this letter to Ced and Dick, the only Guion’s away from home at this point. Both Lad (from Venezuela) and Dan (from Alaska) have returned to Trumbull. On Thursday, two post cards from Aunt Helen (Peabody) Human. On Friday, one more letter from Grandpa to wrap up November.

Judy Guion