Autobiography of Mary E. Wilson (1) – Mary Meets Archie Wilson – 1935

Mary E. Wilson

1935

          I was now 24 years old and my mother was beginning to worry I was not going to get married. It was at this time I had gone to a dance at the Ritz Ballroom with Francis and I met a good-looking man who asked me to dance. He was with Herbert Perkins, the brother of Ted. Herb formally introduced us and his name was Archie Wilson. I think we were attracted to each other the moment we met. We danced every dance together that night and a very popular dance tune at the time was “When I Grow Too Old to Dream”. He took me home. I really don’t know who took Francis home, maybe Herbie but Archie was cute.

I remember telling my mother about a nice young man I met and as usual my mother asked, “What is his nationality?”, “What is his religion?”, And, “What did he do for a living?”. I had not asked and did not know.

I thought about him often. I had to go to a Sunday school meeting at Mrs. Saul’s house and believe it or not she was discussing her godchild and saying how sorry she was for him. He and his wife had separated and they were getting a divorce. She was referring to Archie, he had been married less than a year. I felt really disappointed but figured you can’t win them all but we had seemed to be mutually attracted to each other.

I started to see him in charge and as I said he was friendly with the Perkins’. I saw him again and the dance but did not go home with him. He was a nice person and I loved dancing with him. He seemed to be showing up at places I attended. I very discreetly started to question Fred about him but he said nothing nice about Archie.

About two or three weeks later Archie was waiting for me outside of the G. E. gates and he asked me to accompany him to a Shell Company dance at the Commodore Hotel in New York. He carefully explained we would be well chaperoned by Mrs. Perkins, Ted and Herbie, her sons, and their dates. I accepted the date but did not tell my mother about Archie’s marital problems. I remember I splurged on a beautiful white coat with a rhinestone belt and silver shoes. I really felt elegant but a little uneasy about dating a married man even with plenty of chaperones.

I sensed that Mrs. Perkins did not approve because she knew I dated Fred and she was friendly with the Williams’s. I had spoken to Fred about a week before and he had given me an ultimatum… I refused to go with RT to New York for we were through seeing each other. I decided to go to New York with Archie.

Tomorrow, I’ll continue the story of Mary and Archie.

I interviewed my Dad and some of his siblings to have a record of their childhood memories. Dave told me about his trip from Okinawa to Manila. I have updated the post from earlier this week. You can use this link to read his memories of that fateful trip. https://greatestgenerationlessons.wordpress.com/2017/04/12/trumbull-dear-benedicts-and-bachelors-dave-sent-to-manila-september-1945/

Next week, I’ll be posting letters from 1941. Lad is working at Producto in Bridgeport. Dan has left Alaska and is back in Trumbull. Ced and Dick remain in Anchorage, but the Trumbull house is filling up.

Judy Guion

Autobiography of Mary E Wilson (12) – A Double Life – 1933-1934

Mary E. Wilson

Not much has changed in Mary’s life so this is a rather short post. She seems quite happy with everything.

1933 – 1934

          My life at this time was quiet, nothing exciting was happening. Life was amiable at home. Doris was a good girl but willful.

My mother had decided that now that I was 22, I could keep half of my earnings. Three other girls and myself decided to take up horseback riding. I loved it and went two or three times a week.

I still dated Fred but I dated other young men to. I love going to the Ritz Ballroom and also danced and Quilty’s and Pleasure Beach Dance Hall. Fred did not like to dance and he worked nights every other week so it worked out just fine.

At this time, Dr. Nasti’s wife died and they had only been married a year. We had a rough time at the office because I could not depend on him to keep his appointments. For almost a year he had a bad time then he met a former girlfriend and they started going out and married.

I still had my part-time work in the G.E. but they were becoming very uneasy because there were more rumblings in Europe. I had a good job in but loved working for Dr. Nastri so I worked longer hours and was able to keep both jobs. I had no time for night school but I was happy doing my thing.

Somehow I felt I was leading a dual life. Two weeks I dated Fred and kept very reserved and had quiet times with him and his older friends playing bridge, etc. The other two weeks I hung around Francis and other friends, did a lot of dancing, horseback riding, picnics, swimming parties and also participated in exercise clubs but we did have fun times.

Celso was still my best friend and my nephew Jimmy had grown into a beautiful boy. My mother adored her first grandchild and spoiled him rotten.

Starting tomorrow and for the next of the week, I’ll be posting letters written in 1945. Dan is married but Paulette cannot come to Trumbull because of travel restrictions. Grandpa keeps everyone in the family aware of what’s happening to the rest of the family.

Judy Guion

 

 

Mary E. Wilson Autobiography – 1935 (2)

Mary E. Wilson

Mary E. Wilson

We really had a marvelous time in New York and somehow Archie managed to be able to drive me home alone in his car. I don’t know how he arranged it that we did not get home until 4 AM. The Perkins were furious because they stayed right with us on our drive home. I hate to mention what my mother said when I arrived home. She made it her business to call Mrs. Perkins to find out if she had really been with us in New York. I was very angry, I was 24 years old and we have been closely escorted even though we were in separate cars.

But Archie and I talked on our way home. He hated his wife and was waiting for his divorce to be finalized. He worked in New Haven for the Shell oil company. He lived with his parents and two brothers on Bond Street across from the G. E.. Archie was born in Scotland but had lived in Canada prior to moving to the states.

We started to see each other for a few minutes at the G.E. gates while I was en route to work and I also saw him at dances. He started attending church at St. Luke’s so we smiled at each other from a distance. Fred was not stupid, he knew what was going on, so he told my brother, Arthur. I was not dating Fred anymore but Arthur told me I should not see Archie but he did not tell my mother. We finally did start to date very discreetly with the help of Francis, Celso, my two brothers, and Archie’s two brothers.

It was evident by now we were in love with each other and start to plan a life together when he got a divorce.

Alec, Archie’s younger brother, would come to the house to take me core spec writing. He was so handsome, he reminded me of Tyrone power and my mother told me I was robbing the cradle because he was so young. Alec and I truly became good friends and we both loved horseback riding and I really think Archie encouraged Alec’s take me out while he was working.

In spite of Archie’s impatience waiting for his divorce to become final, we really had a nice courtship. I would take a day off and we would spend it at the beach. Get a good friend called Bill and we would double date good bill would have to come to the house to get me.

Archie and Bill both worked for the shell company and I often wondered what bills girlfriends thought about it all.

My mother thought Bill was really nice and I really think she was having hopes again for her spinster daughter because by now I was 25 years old.

Next Sunday, we’ll find out what 1936 and 1937 have in store for Mary. Will she marry Archie or will they have to wait?

This week, it’s 1940 and Lad is the only son away from home. He has beem working in Venezuela for over a year and Grandpa misses his oldest son quite a bit. I’ll be posting letters to and from Venezuela.

Judy Guion

Autobiography of Mary E. Wilson – 1933 – 1934

 

Mary E. Wilson

Mary E. Wilson

Not much has changed in Mary’s life so this is a rather short post. She seems quite happy with everything.

1933 – 1934

          My life at this time was quiet, nothing exciting was happening. Life was amiable at home. Doris was a good girl but willful.

My mother had decided that now that I was 22, I could keep half of my earnings. Three other girls and myself decided to take up horseback riding. I loved it and went two or three times a week.

I still dated Fred but I dated other young men to. I love going to the Ritz Ballroom and also danced and Quilty’s and Pleasure Beach Dance Hall. Fred did not like to dance and he worked nights every other week so it worked out just fine.

At this time, Dr. Nasti’s wife died and they had only been married a year. We had a rough time at the office because I could not depend on him to keep his appointments. For almost a year he had a bad time then he met a former girlfriend and they started going out and married.

I still had my part-time work in the G.E. but they were becoming very uneasy because there were more rumblings in Europe. I had a good job in but loved working for Dr. Nastri so I worked longer hours and was able to keep both jobs. I had no time for night school but I was happy doing my thing.

Somehow I felt I was leading a dual life. Two weeks I dated Fred and kept very reserved and had quiet times with him and his older friends playing bridge, etc. The other two weeks I hung around Francis and other friends, did a lot of dancing, horseback riding, picnics, swimming parties and also participated in exercise clubs but we did have fun times.

Celso was still my best friend and my nephew Jimmy had grown into a beautiful boy. My mother adored her first grandchild and spoiled him rotten.

Next Sunday, we’ll see what 1935 brings into the life of Mary E. Wilson. 

Tomorrow, I’ll begin posting letters written in late 1940, when Dan and Ced are working in Alaska and Lad is in Venezuela. Grandpa continues to keep his boys aware of what is happening in the family and in Trumbull.

Judy Guion