Friends – A Letter From Nome, Alaska and A Postcard From Honolulu, Hawaii – July 10 and 11, 1944

 

Rusty Huerlin

Nome, Alaska

July 9, 1944

Dear Ced,

Stormy weather for about one week. Expect “ada” down from Kotzebue any day now, then it will be a mad rush to get everything aboard her and pull stakes for Pt. Barrow where I finally decided to locate, if they’ll have me there.

Many, many thanks for green stuff. They arrived in O.K. condition same day boat brought first greens we’ve had here since fall, three more boats with more greens – then a tanker with whiskey and beer. But I went in for the milk on first boat – drank so much of it (40 cents a paper quart) that I quit when I noticed that my tits were growing.

Who am I to thank for the beautiful scarf? Hardly a chance of wearing such finery until I get back to Anchorage again.

As for the paintings you wrote about, will take care of the matter as soon as I get situated up north. Will write Byrl first chance I get. These are busy days.

Thanks for sending pictures. Swell to look at and letters to read from home. Will return slides to you in care of Fiske when he looks in this way again. If possible for him to handle frames you have and deliver them to Major Marston – Wallace Hotel, Nome, for me, that would be swell. But if it runs into money for this, skip it, as I could not take care of that now. He may not be coming this way again for some time. He has been flying Mackenzie’s ship and with “Mac” back in Anchorage now he may fly his own ship to Nome. I could get “Mac” to fly them through, however, if either of them coming here soon. I could not take them on first trip this way. I had better not have them sent here as I would not care to have them sent up to Pt. Barrow unless I took personal care of them.

Hell of a rush now. Will write you at greater length first chance I get.

Love to all,

As ever,

Rusty

********************************************************************************************************************

 

Gibby - Post card to Ced from Hawaii - front, 1944

“Isle O’ Dreams”, Hawaii

Gibby - Post card to Ced from Hawaii - message - 1944

Honolulu, June 28

FROM

Arnold Gibson

Ship 51 N Y

Pearl Harbor,

 Dear Ced,

Here I am back in Hawaii. Alta (Alta (Pratt) Gibson, his wife and another friend from the old gang in Trumbull) is in Cal. and will follow later.

We saw Lad and Marian in Orinda (where Marian’s parents live) and had a swell day. Wish I had a little Alaska  weather right now.

Aloha, Gib

Tomorrow and Sunday I will be posting a long letter from Dave to his Dad and all concerned.  

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Distant Ones – Bits and Pieces of Local Interest – May 7, 1939

 

 

 

R-21

May 7, 1939

Dear Distant Ones:

Today has been a real summer day, really hot, almost more like July than June.  Yesterday Rusty had the boys,  Dick and Dave – – (Ced was working) busy all day cleaning house and beating rugs.  I did some work around the grounds, cleaning up behind the barn  where we sawed up the wood and straightening up in the vicinity of the incinerator.  The next job will be to take down the storm sash and put up the screens.  Rusty has spent most of the afternoon painting his picture.  He has some arrangement with his dentist to paint him a picture in return for getting his teeth fixed up.  Dave has gone to the Young People’s (a group organized by the Trumbull Congregational Church) and Ced has gone on a picnic with Red (Sirene) and Jean (Hughes) and I think Bar (Barbara Plumb).

 

Lad’s Packard and Mack

Ced hasn’t said much about his job.  I don’t think he likes it much and it is pretty strenuous work, hard on his hands, etc.,  But he hasn’t complained.  He has made some arrangement with Arnold (Gibson, Lad’s best friend) who is working on the Merritt Parkway over Stratford way, to drop him off at the Tilo factory on the way to work each morning. Ced has not had enough money to renew the Packard’s registration, so the old Packard is having a vacation.

Ted (Uncle Ted Human, a Civil Engineer who was placed in charge of the project to build a road from Caracas to Maracaibo, who brought Lad and Dan to Venezuela to work for Inter-America Inc.  He was in a serious car accident in March and has returned to the U. S.  to recuperate in Trumbull, and is fighting to get paid by Inter-America, Inc., who is in serious financial and legal troubles.) seems to be coming along slowly.  He was walking around outside today a bit, sitting mostly in an easy chair in the shade with Aunt Helen ((Peabody) Human, Grandma Arla’s next younger sister) hovering around him.  She tends him like a hen with one chicken.  I don’t believe he can even blow his nose without her offering to assist him.  Rusty and I have been secretly amused because it is carried to a ridiculous extent, and I believe annoys him at times.

The only letter I have received from Lad this week was the one acknowledged in my last, telling his adventures with the cow.  Dan’s letter was one written just about the time he wrote the airmail letter which I have already answered telling him Ted’s advice on quitting the company’s employ.

Next Sunday I rather imagine we will have a house full of relatives as Saturday, I believe, is Grandma’s (Grandma Peabody) birthday and all the New Rochelle clan are planning to come to Trumbull to celebrate the event Sunday.  I don’t yet know all the details.

To date, Dan, ten colleges have sent catalogs.  Before you can intelligently decide upon the best college to attend, you should decide whether you are most interested in eventually taking up mining, oil, paleontology or teaching.  Mining is also subdivided into coal, metals, cement, ceramics, etc.  Rusty says the main topic taught at the University of Alaska is mining and metallurgical, as the future of Alaska, many believe, lies in its mineral wealth and much of its territory needs exploration, and there is only a comparatively short summer in which to do this sort of work.

As I sit here in front of the radio with Rusty in the other chair, Dave on the sofa and Mack licking his front paw, just an ordinary Sunday evening setting, I am wondering what you two boys are doing in your respective parts of Venezuela at this moment.  Possibly, Lad, you are listening to the Ford hour on the Radio although I do not know, of course, whether you have a radio at the camp that gets the N. Y.  Stations.  I am pretty sure Dan has not.  By the way, Lad, what do you do on Sundays?  Is there any work or do you have a complete day of rest, and if so, how do you spend it?  Do you suppose if you spend very much time in the tropics with natives who are at the other end of the scale of hustling, and where no one expects you to do anything other than the way the custom of the country expect, do you quickly lose the Yankee habits of energy and speed and efficiency and over time in order to get a job finished on time and all those other things that mark the difference between a Northerner and a South American, or do they still keep their American habits to a large extent.  It would probably take years in this environment for an American to entirely switch over and turn native in this regard, and probably even then he would have to be temperamentally lazy to start with.

The lilacs during the last few days have made considerable progress and it looks as though they might be out in a week or so if we have a few more days like this and some rain along with it.  The trees have not made any considerable progress yet as far as leaves are concerned, but buds are swelling, the grass is beginning to grow and in general spring is here.

Rusty says to tell you not to get your feet caught in the machinery, and Lad especially is to lay off of that bull about the cow.  Privately, Lad, he thinks it is the mesquite you must have been drinking that is responsible for the tall story you wrote us.  He says however, he can forgive you even this as he has received letters from both of you and was very glad to hear from you.

There is no news of any moment for me to record at this time so the wisest course under such circumstances is to quit, anyway, Rusty is waiting to use this machine to write some letters, so I will close with Dan’s favorite phrase, hasta luego.

DAD

For the rest of the week I will be posting a three-page letter from Grandpa to Lewis & Clark. 

Judy Guion

 

Trumbull – Dear Ferdinand – Rusty Huerlin is Visiting and Painting – May 4, 1939

It is now May of 1939. Lad has a new job with the Socony-Vacuum Oil Company maintaining vehicles and Diesel engines running their oil pumps at various camps in Northern Venezuela. Dan is still with Inter-America Inc, trying to figure out how to be paid in full and how he will get home.

 

Trumbull House

R-20

May 4th, 1939

Dear Ferdinand:

When the cow saw you she must have mistaken you for Walt Disney’s hero and was just acting playful.  I can see now where I have neglected your education.  There you are in the land of bull fighters, with an opportunity coming right at you and instead of being in position to seize opportunity by the horns and become a national hero, you turn and run.  And here again I have failed as a father, for instead of bringing you up as a pole vaulter training to make a graceful landing you flop down on the west side of the fence entirely out of bounds.  What became of the cow?  You left us in suspense on that score.  We don’t know whether she is still pawing the ground in front of your protective pole or whether chastened and chagrined, she slowly turned tail and retreated.  Is it Venezuela where they get milk from contented cows?  Seriously, you did have a lucky escape and while it is humorous to relate and look back upon, it must have given you a hectic few moments.

In answer to this letter and when you think you have no news, write an answer to the following questions: How big is your camp?  Describe the various buildings, particularly the one where you work and where you sleep and eat.  Describe the men you are in contact with.  What is your daily routine?  Who do you have under you and who over you in authority?  What don’t you like about the place and what do you like?  What are the prospects for the future?  What kind of magazines would you like?  Fiction, news, pictures, automobile trade or what?

Rusty (Huerlin) came to pay us a visit.  He is sleeping on the front porch but will do his painting up in Ced’s room.  Ced has been working all this week at the Tilo factory.  It is hard work and he is pretty tired nights but is sticking it out in the typical Guion manner.  Elizabeth has just come in (10 P..M.) with a nice rainbow trout, 14 inches long, which Zeke just caught down in the stream.

Tuesday we had a disgusting town meeting at which your father and practically every other town officer came in for a lot of unwarranted abuse and mudslinging, principally from our good friend Sexton, backed by a group of low intelligent, disgruntled, trouble-makers.  I am enclosing a newspaper account which gives a very small idea of what actually took place.  Andy Krisak was in the town hall tonight asking me to sign a permit for a gas station.  He had bought Heath’s station in Long Hill.  He asked about

Page 2 of R-20

both you boys. I read him your letter relating your adventure with the cow.

Oh, Lad, while I think of it, where did you get the lawn mower sharpened?  It seemed to me that you felt it was an especially good job but I cannot recall who did it.  We ought to have it sharpened again.

Dear Dan:

You will be interested to know that Red (Sirene, a good friend of Dan’s)  has just received word that he has successfully passed his entrance exams for Pratt Institute and naturally is quite elated.

Uncle Ted says that he has received a cable from Caracas saying that the second payment, which was due, was not paid, and is now awaiting word as to the reason.

There is not much else in the way of news that occurs to me.  Maybe it’s because I’m tired and my brain is kind of numb, but I did want to get this off so that it would catch Friday’s boat for Caracas.

Ced suggests I tell you that he intends to write you both when he gets a chance.

Well, good night laddiebucks, and here’s hoping I’ll hear from you both again soon.

DAD

During the rest of the week, I will be posting two more letters from Grandpa to Lad and Dan. 

Judy Guion

Friends – Dear Sudrack – Another Letter to Ced From Rusty Huerlin – June 13, 1944

 

 

Nome, Alaska

June 13, 1944

Dear Sudrack,

Why don’t you ask me to do something for you once in a while so I can ask favors of you without total embarrassment? You have a mean way of putting a fellow on the spot. That is all I can say about you.

Thanks for sending newspaper but which article did you want me to read? I still have it in my can for light reading. No heavy stuff there as I’m burdened enough with weighty matters every time I find the growler. You wouldn’t like Nome because we really don’t have the growlers here — no running toilets or “waters” and the sanitation is not and it stinks. But Nome is proud of Nome and do not want their shortcomings being wide cast. Think I had better move soon as I’m afraid I’m going to like it here.

Most important thing on my schedule now is word “yes” or “no” from Harry Olson. So kindly drop everything and give him a ring either at Alaska Novelty Company, Olson’s Cleaners or drop in at Ed Coffy’s and inquire as to his whereabouts. Just want to know if he got my letter of some three weeks ago — that’s all.

If you can visit Anchorage Grill, ask for Stanley (forgotten his last name) and tell him I want to be remembered to him. Get his last name and sometime when you write me you can send it along so I can drop him a line. He is the owner of a fine establishment, always neatly dressed and impeccable in character. You might tell him I read “My Native Land” by Adonis and found it a most important book, in fact, the best I have read since “10 Days Which Shook the World”. Stanley is one of those fellows which you have to dig up to know and perhaps the most farsighted of Anchorage, yet few people, if any, know him down there. As this book is written of his native land known as Yugoslavia I do not remember from what section he comes — what country — Serbia, Croatia, Slovenia, Livonia, Dalmotia,, Bosnia, Herzgovenia, Slovenia, Macedonia, Montenegro, or Goyrodina. I am just a Swede from Scandinavia. More simple with you — half breed from Larchmont, N.Y.

Good night!     ——- Rusty

Two boats from Seattle jammed in ice. Snowing today and cold.

(Heard from Sansbury’s – have moved again to where it is cooler – St. Ignatius, Montana, Route one. They’ll be back to Alaska one of these days.)

During the rest of the week I’ll be posting a letter from Grandpa to his sons and daughter-in-laws, scattered around the country and the world and one from Marian about their recent furlough.

Judy Guion

 

Friends – Dear Ced Hotfoot Guionferno – From Rusty Huerlin – June 8, 1944

This post begins a week of letters written in June of 1944. Lad is in  Pomona, California with his wife of a little over six months, Marian; Dan is still in London, Ced is in Anchorage, Alaska, Dick is in Florida, with his wife, Jean, awaiting a transfer to somewhere, and Dave is coming home for a furlough – and his High School Graduation. Grandpa is eagerly awaiting his arrival.

 

Rusty Huerlin in  Alaska.

 

 

Nome, Alaska

June 8, 1944

Dear Ced Hotfoot Guionferno –

As I have forgotten how to spell Bill Dowes name and also forgotten the name of (the old) Lonsoac’s # 2  store, will you kindly take the enclosed in and give it to him personally at your earliest inconvenience. Have been waiting to hear from him for two months on picture I sent outside for duplicate.

Trust you got my letter explaining why I did not send ivory etc. to you. Will start purchasing as soon as I get away on trip north. You got the letter so will not have to wear my poor eyes out on this.

You wouldn’t like it over this way. No green vegetables and particularly no fish. Snowing to day and miserable weather. Leaving for God’s country in a month from today. Will write you at greater length — now busy as a cat in a stone quarry.

Guess I’ll have to write you another.

Tomorrow, another, longer letter from Rusty to Ced. The rest of the week will be filled with a letter from Grandpa to his boys (and the two wives) scattered around the world and one from Marian about their furlough..

Judy Guion

Life in Alaska – Dear Ced – Distinguished Service Citation – May 24, 1944

This week, I have moved forward to 1944, a time when all five of Grandpa’s sons are serving the war effort in one way or another. Lad is in California, with his new bride, Marian, training vehicle mechanics for the Army; Dan is in London, with trips to Paris, probably drawing maps for the coming Army invasion; Ced is working as an airplane mechanic at an airfield which has been taken over by the Army; Dick is in Brazil, working as an M.P. and acting as a liaison between the Army and the local workmen; Dave has been in the Army for about six months and is at Camp Crowder, Missouri, for further training before being sent overseas. 

Nome, Alaska

May 24, 1944

Dear Ced,

Sure wish to thank you for taking care of frames for me. Will someday show appreciation for lifts you’ve given me. But plans have taken a change with me on these frames being sent here. May have you deliver them later on to someone in Anchorage who may take care of selling my work, as then would only need 2 frames — one gold and one silver to show paintings in — judge type of frame best for pictures I sent to this person in Anchorage — send picture without frame and tell him which kind to use. This is a more practical arrangement. So hold on to them until you hear from me on this score.

Cashed your money order and went to Bureau of Indian Affairs Office to pick you up some ivory. In same mail came a check from Harry Olson of Anchorage for whom I was going to do some work. But come to find out that they are sending all their ivory over  to office in Juneau. Next best thing I can do is to pick up stuff direct from natives on trips to Pt. Barrow. Will stop at Diomede where Indian Affairs got ivory, was in hopes of getting here so I will get the jump on them here over there. But what may be of greater value are whale bone baskets made farther north, as the art is slowly passing away and most all this work is real art.

Ice is still reflecting into sky blinding light. Looks like you were going to lose but many on turning point of war with regard to invasion. We had invasion pool here – month by month — but will not take any chance until month of July. For some reason or other I peg July 5th but who cares what I think anyway. I could be wrong on this psychological analysis. That means — look it up in the dictionary!

You wouldn’t like it here — grapefruit 90 cents apiece — lemons .20 cents apiece. Why should I eat them just because they are not to be had during winter time up here? Never went in for them much before says I to greedy storekeepers so can wait till I get back on the farm someday where fruit will be a carrot (for the eyes) then pounds of tomatoes for the gut.

Was over to the flying preacher’s house at a little gathering tonight and we all turned to pages this and that and sung hymns. Find it rather difficult at times to sing with tongue in the cheek. But soon he is taking me on a trip to ___________  in the Piper Cub. Went down to Solomon with him few weeks ago and attended church with him there. Getting to be quite religious these days and seeing as much of Seward Peninsula as I can. Attended Catholic services at Nulato. On way over and was invited to dinner at rectory where I had a delightful repast with Father Band and interesting evening with the 3 sisters. It is nice or good to see how the different men of the different clergy live.

How goes the flying? And how is your daffy boss treating you these days? Nothing new here — marking time only for the breakup. Old Hankus Morgenthau put his hand and seal to distinguished service citation in behalf of War Finance Program whereupon beautifully centered and over pale blue lithograph of Minute Man is this number, name, with “Rusty” written between C. H. It is a neat little tidbit of parchment but I did so want to get a Purple Heart. Feel wounded as it is, so I think that I should – Enuff stuffy stuff so’ll be writing you anon – when I have something interesting to tell you.

Best to all friends in Anchorage as ever and thanks again for taking care of the frames.

Rusty

For the rest of the week, two more letters from Grandpa to his scattered family.

Judy Guion

Life in Alaska – Dear Ced – One More Request – April 27, 1944

 

Judy_0003

Cedric Duryee Guion

Nome, Alaska
April 27, 1944

Dear Ced,
Here we come to the unpleasant matter of Lloyd E Jensen and C Heurlin. What can I say about it? What can I do about it? I ordered them before Xmas and he has just gotten around to making them for me. Pictures this size will be my best sales for the next year over this way and I got six frames in only too insignificant a number with which to carry on, however, invaluable for showing pictures and if I can see them without the frames.
On leaving Anchorage I went out with a clean slate but for a balance of $25 to George Rengard and what I.O.U. I spent $300 in getting straightened out. Sure wish I could have taken care of bill to you but felt I could leave it to the more graceful going away if I squared up with merchants in Anchorage. If you still have faith in this old bum and are able to do something about getting frames for me – send Jensen a money order right away and in it a note to have him ship frames to you. Better use typewriter for that stubborn dumbkoff –

“Kindly ship Mr. Heurlin’s frames to me as soon as possible. He is in the Arctic and has left many pictures with me to frame. I cannot dispose of these paintings for him until they are framed so will greatly appreciate receiving them from you on next boat north.
Sincerely yours
Cedric Guion
Anchorage, Alaska”

I have given you a lot of headaches in the past – this to do and that to do and you never have asked a thing of me. Well, hope you don’t sigh too heavily over this. I have to make close to $1000 in a short time before I go up north. But once there with a year’s grubstake with me, I will start going ahead and with plenty of speed to clear up any debts with you. I have hated like hell to ask another favor of you, but boy! If you could possibly take care of it I will make sure of one thing in the days to come and that will be to see that you come out on top for this last big favor.
I will make arrangements with Gordon McKenzie to pick up these frames from you and get them to me with his careful handling.
Now to take care of one last piece of business and then to hit the sleeping bag.

Rusty

Tomorrow and Sunday, more letters from Dave, a young recruit, working hard to get through his training before being shipped overseas.

Judy Guion

Life in Alaska – Cedric Guion, Scavenger – A TO DO List From Rusty – April 20, 1944

The following is a letter from Rusty,  (Magnus Colcord Heurlin, a very good friend of the family and who would become a very well known Alaskan Artist). He has left Anchorage and is traveling with Major Marston, in charge of Security for Alaska, and Gov. Greuning, who wants to meet the various natives he is governing. Rusty is along to sketch and will use much of this material in future paintings of Alaskan life.

CDG - Rusty's TO DO List - April, 1944

CDG - Rusty's TO DO List - signature page - April, 1944

Nome, Alaska

April 20, 1944

Cedric Guion

Scavenger

Anchorage, Alaska

Dear Ced,

Spent the afternoon out at airbase here going over air manifests but could find no entrance reports on any 4 pieces shipped from Anchorage. A Lieut. Ladrak suggested I write you  to check what plane the stuff went on – see if it was Troop Carrier 3541, a C 47 plane which left Anchorage on the 7th of March. He thinks the bag was returned if put on the plane and that it may be in the Air Cargo Warehouse at Anchorage airbase. If you locate it there have them ship it again with Army tag attached which has a stub number, clip off stub and mail to me.

Sorry to put you to all this work. I know nothing will be done about it unless you take the bull by the horns and make the search yourself. They are positive it was never unloaded here so if it came on that plane it was returned to Anchorage.

Where are you staying, Ced? Apparently you are not with George anymore. Must write to Hans and Ruth – Clara will be the next one to approach if you’ll be around for a space.

When you go out to the base take along a bunch of carrots – first, in case you locate bag, second, If any other guns you lay eyes on that you think will help if plane is going within a few days for Nome.

You should have seen four wolves hung up on main drag in front of Munn’s Arrival Office. They were shot from plane and picked out of a pack of nine chasing reindeer. They were all large but one larger than the rest weighed 175 pounds. The largest dogs in town sniffing them over looked like pygmies in comparison. Hanging with nose touching the ground they were longer than 6 feet from nose only to halfway up on their hind legs. This seems unbelievable but it is true. They would be more than twice as long as old Mack and were more than twice as large. I have never seen a black bear that would make a mistake for them and I believe the largest could take down a polar bear if it got its fangs into its throat or neck.

Enclosed is a letter finalizing the “Major played me one”. Lottie says hi, better sew his pants to his shirt when he comes up this way again.” Will you send it to Al (Grandpa) in your next letter.

We kindly see Bill Doran’s (don’t know how to spell it) at Fonsac’s #2 store and inquire about pictures I sent out with him for duplicates. Address is Nome.

And one more thing Ced – my Maul Stick left at George’s. Please get a tag and tie it around knob end. On tag write, “Gordon McKenzie for C Heurlin, Nome.” And leave it at Star Airways office.

About all I can think of now. Soon as I can think of more for you to do will certainly write you.

Lt. Heurlin, ____ later – PFC

Tomorrow, a card referencing an incident dating back to Easter and a misunderstanding, then another letter from Rusty, Grandpa’s answer to Marian’s note and finally a letter from Lad. This looks like it will be a very interesting week. Enjoy.

Judy Guion

Life in Alaska – Dear Ced – Rusty Huerlin writes from Nome, Alaska – April 15, 1944

The year is 1944. All of Grandpa’s sons are scattered around the world. Lad is married and training mechanics for the Army in California. Dan is in London and making frequent trips to France. I don’t know exactly what he is doing but he is a Surveyor and Civil Engineer and D-Day is coming soon. Did he have a part in planning the invasion? I don’t know. Ced is in Alaska working to retrieve and repair airplanes for the Army in the Anchorage area. Dick is an MP (Military Police) in Brazil, I believe acting as a liaison between the Army and the locals. Dave, the youngest, had left school when he turned 18 and joined the Army. He is currently going through Basic Training at Camp Crowder, Missouri Grandpa is in Trumbull with Dick’s wife, Jean, and doing his best to keep everyone in the family informed about what is going on in the lives of their siblings.

 Rusty is in Nome, Alaska, with no heat, and his hands are very cold. He writes with a business proposition for Ced.

Nome, Alaska

April 15, 1944

Dear Ced,

Your most welcomed letter received yet the news was sorrowful about poor Grandma Peabody’s passing. But it is over for her and now – all the unhappiness she had to bear in losing the ones she loved. But it was wonderful that all her children stayed by her and that must have been consoling to her. I think they expressed in a most civilized action in waiving all customs of the actual departure, aside of the feeling that manufactured words of the preacher gives one – soft spoken and well meant as they may be. No one can intercede for any almighty power – tell one what to do – what to expect – how to go on living, especially when one lives and vibrations have always been on different wavelengths. She understood the silence of brothers and sisters speak finer words in final parting if no interception enters to break the bond. My deepest feelings go out to Dorothy, Helen, Anne, Lawrence, Kemper and Burton for they were her dearest left, as she was theirs.

I am half in furs and half in sleeping bag. It is 15 below outside. Ran out of oil tonight so no heat tomorrow unless I take down the front door and put it in the coal stove.

You wouldn’t like Nome at all – not enough water for you to wash out burnt pans and it takes plenty of water to do that. But I have discovered a trick. Just turn the pan upside down – let all the burnt beans fall out then put same pan back on the stove. Gradually the burnt will all flake off – every bit of it, and it will need no washing for the next batch – we live and learn do we not?

Saw Betty Davis for the first time tonight – picture – “The Little Foxes” ( http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0033836/ ) at the Dream theater. It should have been named “The Wolf Pack” or “The Great Big Wolves”, anyway she is a truly great actress.

You all did right by my baggage left behind even though I have lost the jib sail bag. Confidentially now – I do not wish it known that the Brown boys took anything of mine from Anchorage to Nome. So if you will kindly contact Lieut. Brooks at Army Transportation and tell him since I was informed by him there would be no plane from Anchorage to Nome for a month or probably two months – his words – that I had changed my plans and had, unbeknownst to you and George, made other arrangements to get all my stuff here. Next month I can write to him but don’t want anything to go down in writing to him as yet and this is confidential between you and me. Why I do not want to wait until then –  it is because some effort should be made to locate the bag before many more days have passed. It says jib sail on the bag and I sure would like to get the clothes that are in it to say nothing of the handy old article. After getting your letter I went right over to the base but evidently it never reached here.

It is too long a story why I do not want to write Sgt. Brooks at this time – another thing, I had a tag on the bag – C HEURLIN – NOME.

Hands are about stiff but will warm them up – can hardly see the writing for the storm. Going to be a late break up but I cannot say the exact minute.

Sent Maury some ivory as a starter to see how he makes out on it. If it gets to him this time take a look at it and see what you think. Two of the pieces were damaged in PAA crackup so I got the package back. If you like the seals I can get some for you to sell. Sure you could turn them over at a profit if you stay around long enough. If interested how about you and I going into business? I owe you some money now but hope you will forget it for a time. But here is my idea. Send me what money you can spare – what you can put out and forget and I will put every cent of it into good ivory.Then sell every bit of it at what ever profit you can get and send that money on to buy more. This should build up into a big thing in a very short while, then someday we can or you can take on a store of your own. What do you think will be a fair commission for me, well, should not a 50-50 proposition above cost be agreeable all around? It takes time to locate good stuff and you take time to dispose of it. It is all a matter of making a small sum of money grow – personally I hate business, however, money gained under this set up is an economic necessity today. And we can be dealing in good workmanship. I have come to learn a lot about ivory but have always known good workmanship. I can now buy two large ivory bookends for $38.50 and the Major says they sell in Juneau for $85 perhaps $100 in Anchorage.

Ivory is shipped from here to Seattle and sold to companies in Juneau, then resold to brokerage – bought and sold outside again. A fine set up is this! We can cut out all those middlemen – not be too high priced but keep things moving by selling at fairly good price to the last purchaser. And  your dollars would build up fast. I saw several hundred dollars of it sent to Seattle last week which could have made a nice profit for anyone here with connections in Anchorage to dispose of it there. I have been asked by many people – owners of stores – in Anchorage to write or wire for money when I see something good but why should I take time of my own to help them profit while I lose.

So they didn’t get you in the Army – best of luck to you with your studies. And when you get flying don’t dare nature to ground you. A fine view is stretched out in the rolling plains in back – eight and a  half miles in back of this city. Freddie Mueller, who had walked out of several wrecks said to a few of us a few nights before that no one would be so tough to get him. He, like all the rest, died instantly. Freddie was about 60 years old.

Love to all when you write again, including themselves.

Rusty

For the rest of the week, I’ll post a letter from Grandpa, another from Rusty, a note from Marian and another letter from Grandpa. 

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Patient Reader (1) – Lots of News From Ced – April 4, 1945

 

I will be using the entire week to post a six-page letter from Grandpa with quotes from other letters he has received and news from France.

Easter Sunday, 1945, at Trumbull     4/1/45

Dear “Patient Reader”:

Having forced you last week to arise from the banquet table without having served the desert – – an Alaskan delicacy, a specially prepared by Ced the Chef (who usually burns things but this time turned it out just golden brown) – – I shall now continue in my own inimitable manner, which consists of quoting from others, to wit:

Judy_0003

Cedric Duryee Guion

“I have finally taken up residence at the Morgan Establishment. Myra’s mother arrived on the Aleutian last Saturday afternoon and took over my room. I packed my belongings that evening and barged in at the Morgan’s. As the floor is still being laid I have taken temporary lease of the attic which measures about 4 feet high between the rafters and is probably 12 feet in length and 8 feet usable area wide. Of course I spend a minimum of time up there but it isn’t too bad at that.

Art Woodley arrived from Washington, D. C., and L. A. Sunday evening. He is returning from the hearings on the Anchorage-Seattle run and states that if an Alaskan carrier gets the route he expects it will be himself. He was pleased with the way the proceedings ran. He returned in the Boeing 247, the same one he left in, but he had two new engines installed and the Army paint removed so that it is now silver color and looks infinitely better.

(May 9) Note: that’s what the letter says – – time evidently passes quickly up there) I have been sitting here reading over the previous section and your last few letters to receive some inspiration. I am apparently doing so in vain as little inspiration is forthcoming. Rusty’s address is merely C. Heurlin, Barrow, Alaska. Incidentally, Rusty made big headlines a couple of weeks ago and I will attempt to get you a copy of the times to send. Seems he pitched in and helped (Rusty style) the doctor and nurse at Barrow during an epidemic of influenza among the natives recently. The doctor mentioned in his report that Rusty had helped save many lives and was directly responsible for some recoveries. Last I heard from the hero himself was last fall, and so I have no news to quote directly.

Started the Red Cross first-aid standard course last night and will thus be tied up every Thursday night for the next 10 weeks. My card had about run its course and the Ski Club is trying to get interest in a ski patrol started. As few signed up for the course I felt I had to enter myself as an example. I have had the course twice but one must renew every three years anyway.

My draft status is now occupational deferment until August 11. The day before the date set for my pre-induction physical I was notified that I had been classed as 2-A again.

I continue to receive your most welcome letters and continue to fail to answer regularly. Correspondence, other than to you, is too much of a disgrace even to mention. I have quite a few slides up here. Would you like me to send the ones you haven’t seen with the idea of your returning them? Occasionally I like to show some of them to folks up here which is why I would like to have them returned, otherwise I’ll bring them along on my next trip eastward, probably after the war. What I have in mind is to drive out on the highway and East to Trumbull where I would stay for a while. Then perhaps I’d take off for the South seas or South America. The latter place I have never been interested in until quite recently and then it took Walt Disney’s production of “Saludos Amigos” to create the desire to visit that continent.  ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Three_Caballeros )  ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkZRlWekvj8 )  If you haven’t seen the picture, by all means do so. The theme development is about the cleverest I ever remember having seen. As for making Alaska my permanent home, I am rather dubious. Homer or a similar locale might be worthwhile but Anchorage is fast becoming a place to exist but not to live in. Ced.

He also mentions sending a box of gifts home and something to each of the Guion warriors.

 

Tomorrow’s section of the letter carries news of Trumbull, Grandpa, Marian and Jean. Two letters from Dave, a letter from Lad and words for Dan will complete the week.

Judy Guion