Trumbull – Dear Elsie – Family History Concerning Our Grandmother – Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion (5) – July 8, 1940

This letter from Grandpa to his sister, Elsie May Guion, included news of the death and funeral of a close family friend which I will not include, and the very interesting Biography of their Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion. The story begins with Clara’s Grandmother, Juana Cadoret and will fill the entire week.

About three years after his marriage (to Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck), Mr. Guion entered the ministry of the Episcopal Church, and many years later, while living in Louisiana, where much of their married life was spent, he became a Chaplain in the U.S. Army. His wife did not discontinue her teaching, and many years were spent in the school room either as his assistant or as a governess or as the head of a boarding school for young ladies.

ADG - Alfred Beck Guion @ 1885

Alfred Beck Guion, my great-grandfather

11 children were born to them – John Beck (Oct. 14, 1840), Clara Beck (Dec. 14, 1842), Josephine Beck (Dec. 15, 1843), Elijah Beck (Dec. 6, 1845), Adolphus Beck ((Oct. 3, 1847), Covington Beck (July 24, 1849),  Elizabeth Beck (Aug. 23, 1850),  Johanna Beck (Oct. 14, 1852), Alfred Beck (Sept. 23,1853), Almira Beck (Dec. 21, 1855) and George Beck, who died in infancy. Each child received for his second name that of Beck. John, Johanna and George died in infancy. Adolphus grew to manhood and died. Covington, when he was four years old, fell out of his bed and became blind. The other children married and became parents.

On 19 October, 18__, Mme. (Josephine) de Beck passed away in New York City. A great celebration was being held in honor of the opening of the Croton Waterworks. As she lay dying she heard the sound of a clarinet beautifully played. Calling her daughter, she said “Clara, do you hear that clarinet? That is your father playing that.” The poor wandering mind had gone back to the happy days of her youth with the beloved husband from whom she was no longer to be separated.

In 1874 Mr. Guion’s health failing him, his wife went to California to become a teacher in St. Mary’s Hall – a large church boarding school for young ladies in Benicia. Her husband soon followed her. While there, she was reunited with her brother Adolphus Gustavos de Beck) whom she had not seen since the early days of her married life. At that time he went from Cuba to the United States where he made his home, dying in California soon after his meeting with his sister, leaving two children, Mercedita and Francis Edwin.

Mr. Guion and his wife finally went to New Almaden, where he died January 17, 1879.

ADG - Clara Maria de los Dolores Marina de Beck Guion

Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion

At the present time (Christmas, 1893) his wife, my grandmother is still living.

She died February 15, 1896 and her grandchildren will remember her as an extraordinary woman, accomplished to an extraordinary degree, skilled in cooking, needlework, teaching, a fine linguist, a better pianist, with a voice, which, when in its prime, was second only to the finest singers of her generation and which has yet by no means lost its strength and sweetness.

Back through the years of a long life she can look and note its many and great changes. The petted and only daughter of a wealthy Spanish family, the wife of a humble American clergyman, the mother of a large and widely scattered family, ending her days among a few of her children on the extreme western coast of the United States – the land of her adoption – the dearly loved country of her many descendants.

Tomorrow and Sunday, I will post more of the Early Years with the Memories of Elizabeth Westlin (Guion) Zabel.

Judy Guion

 

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Trumbull – Dear Elsie – Family History Concerning Our Grandmother – Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion (4) – July 8, 1940

This letter from Grandpa to his sister, Elsie May Guion, included news of the death and funeral of a close family friend which I will not include, and the very interesting Biography of their Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion. The story begins with Clara’s Grandmother, Juana Cadoret and will fill the entire week.

The page of the Journal where Clara’s marriage to Elijah Guion

A sketch of the marriage Certificate and a Bible

She (Josephine de Beck) was a wealthy woman and henceforth her life, as well as her mother’s (Juana Cadoret), was devoted to her two children. Their home was furnished with every luxury and the children were surrounded with all the evidence of wealth and refinement. Mme. Cadoret was already of great culture and dignity and her influence upon her grandchildren was not small.

When little Clara was five years of age she fell one day while playing, and fractured one of the bones in her ankle. Before she had recovered she was seized with the measles and all of the humor of the disease seemed to center itself in the wounded ankle. For seven years the child was entirely unable to walk. The wound was treated most severely causing her, at many times, great agony. She was strapped to a cot while the wound was burned with caustic until, at last, a hole was formed which reached through the bone, but all treatment was unavailing and the physicians told her mother that amputation was all that was left.

To this, Mme. de Beck would not consent, and when a trip to America was suggested, she seized the idea at once and brought the child to the United States where, in about a year, she recovered the use of her foot. During all this time her education had not been neglected. She was taught with great care and was lifted from her sofa to the piano stool to practice when her health would permit.

A lawsuit had been pending when Mme. de Beck left Cuba. This was decided against her and she lost her wealth. She had been boarding in the school where Clara was a pupil, and the latter now gave lessons in the school to support herself and her mother.

After some time had elapsed she met a gentleman,  and an attachment was formed. Her mother forbade the engagement without giving a reason. Clara, while acceding to her mother’s wishes, could not remain with her.

The page in the Journal where Clara’s marriage is recorded

A sketch of the Marriage Certificate and a Bible

She (Clara) offered herself as a teacher in a large school, was accepted and arrangements were made for her to enter upon her duties at once. The principal promised to send his secretary, Mr. Elijah Guion (my great-grandfather)  to escort her to the school. Claira then told her mother of her plans and although her mother entreated her to withdraw from the agreement, it was too late. At the appointed time she was met by Mr. Guion, escorted to the school and there she began her work. In the course of time Mr. Guion won her consent to accompany him upon the journey through life and on January 2, 1840 they were married in New York.

Tomorrow, the final portion of this journal, which has recorded some of the major life events of three fascinating and courageous women.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Elsie – Family History Concerning Our Grandmother – Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion (3) – July 8, 1940

This letter from Grandpa to his sister, Elsie May Guion, included news of the death and funeral of a close family friend which I will not include, and the very interesting Biography of their Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion. The story begins with Clara’s Grandmother, Juana Cadoret and will fill the entire week.

Meanwhile, Josephine had met with many changes. After the departure of her brothers and sisters, she became friendly with a fellow student, Celestine Montalon and her mother. Celestine was the daughter of a wealthy planter whose plantation was in the suburbs of Baltimore, and the granddaughter of Mme. Le Masurier. The family became much attached to Josephine, who was a highly educated girl and a great favorite. She sang and played well and gave lessons in the school. When Celestine finished school, her friend was invited to go with her to her home which she did.

Shortly after her arrival she heard, one evening, a clarinet beautifully played. In reply to her query Mme.  Montalon told her that the player was a gentleman named de Beck, whom she would take the pleasure of presenting to Josephine. This she did, when in a few days he called upon Mme. Montalon. He inquired of his hostess as to the singer whose sweet voice he had heard, and was presented to Mlle. Cadoret.

The mutual love of music soon drew the young couple together and their engagement took place. When calling on his lady love one evening, Mons. de Beck told her that he had brought her a musical instrument and, laughing at her look of surprise, for he had entered the house empty handed, he drew from his pocket a tiny guitar, about 5 inches in length, beautifully inlaid and ornamented, which upon opening, proved to be a needle case.

Sketch of the tiny needle case

After a short engagement the young people were married, and Mlle. Cadoret became Mme. Adolphus Emmanuel de Beck. Her husband was born in Germany about 1785, his father’s family living in Berlin or in Hamburg. At the time of his marriage Mons. de Beck was a merchant, a member of a firm doing business in Baltimore and in Havana. His partner had charge of the house is Havana but Mons. de Beck, knowing his wife’s desire to be with her mother, succeeded in effecting a change by which his partner came to Baltimore and Mons. de Beck was able to make his home in Cuba.

They embarked for Havana when their only son, Adolphus  Gustavus, was four months old. When the ship was opposite the coast of Georgia it was shot upon and stopped by pirates who boarded the vessel. The captain calmed the passengers who were half dead with fright, bade them secrete their jewels and invited the ladies to assist him in entertaining their unwelcome guests. He spread before them a sumptuous meal and treated them so well that they left the ship and passengers unharmed and went their way. Mons. de Beck and his family reached Cuba in safety and he was able to make the acquaintance of his mother-in-law.

When their little son was 2 1/2 years old, a daughter was born, July 18, 1819 (my  Great Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion).

Among the many names, that of Dolores was given her as a complement to her godmother, the wife of Mons. Facon.

When the child, Clara, was 20 months old, her father was one day playing the Piccolo, a small flute, the playing of which was very trying to his lungs. His wife was standing behind him when his head fell against her, and she saw blood flowing from his mouth. Assistance was in vain, he had broken a blood vessel and in a short time Mme. de Beck was a widow.

Tomorrow and Friday, I will continue the fascinating story of my Great Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Elsie – Family History Concerning Our Grandmother – Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion (2) – July 8, 1940

This letter from Grandpa to his sister, Elsie May Guion, included news of the death and funeral of a close family friend which I will not include, and the very interesting Biography of their Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion. The story begins with Clara’s Grandmother, Juana Cadoret and will fill the entire week.

Her three sons had been sent to England before their father’s arrest, to be educated. Lorenzo, the eldest, was studying for the Ministry in the Church of England. Francis began the study of medecine, but the sight of blood always caused him to faint, and he was obliged to give up his studies.

A ship was bought, named by the new owners “Les Trois Soeurs”, and placed in the charge of a friendly captain. The vessel narrowly escaped being seized by the government, but the six children succeeded in reaching it with the governess without being detected. The vessel at once left port and the unfortunate family had soon bid adieu forever to their native land.

Sketch of the Island in the Journal

The voyage was begun in time for them to reach Cuba in the fall before the yellow fever should begin. They were delayed, however, by contrary winds, and when about three leagues from the island of Las Noevitas, in the old Bahama Channel, they met stormy weather. The passengers awoke one morning to find the vessel on one side. A strong wind from the Gulfstream arose every day and there was every prospect that the vessel would capsize. The passengers took their clothing and jewels, and were placed in a small boat, with biscuits and water, and rowed to the island. It was inhabited only by wild animals, to avoid which they climbed the trees. They hoisted a flag of distress, and on the morning of the third day, discovered a sail. They experienced great anxiety lest their signal should not be seen, but it was noticed and the vessel came to their rescue. She proved to be an American ship from New York, bound for Cuba. The captain –Hicks – treated them with Christian kindness, set a sumptuous table for them, and landed them safely in Cuba where Juana Cadoret gladly welcomed her children whom she had given up for lost. The voyage had taken six months and they had arrived in the midst of the dreaded yellow fever season.

The mother at once sent them with their governess to Philadelphia where the girls were placed in a boarding school on Chestnut Street. A week after their arrival, Frederick, the youngest son, was assassinated in the street, being mistaken for someone else. The two oldest girls, with their governess, disliked the climate and were dissatisfied and unhappy, and at the end of six months the whole family, with the exception of Josephine, returned to Cuba. They scarcely landed before the governess and the two young men, the older of whom was about 24, died of yellow fever. The sisters were smitten with the fever, but recovered. Afterwards, Katrine married Mons. Noel ______, a French physician, who died leaving her two children, Hypolyte who followed in his father’s profession, and Roseline.

Jane (Jeanne) married a Spanish gentleman, who rendered her life miserable because of his mad jealousy of her beauty. At the end of four or five years he was obliged to be away from his wife for a few hours, and having finished his business, started for home, in spite of a furious storm, so fearful was he to leave his wife alone. When but a few miles from his home he was struck by lightning and killed. His rider less horse reached home and a search was made for his master, whose lifeless body was discovered on the ground.

Tomorrow and for the rest of the week, I will continue the story of three remarkable women, my Great Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion, her Mother, Josephine (Cadoret) de Beck and her Grandmother, Juana Cadoret.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Elsie – Family History Concerning Our Grandmother – Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion (1) – July 8, 1940

This letter from Grandpa to his sister, Elsie May Guion, included news of the death and funeral of a close family friend which I will not include, and the very interesting Biography of their Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion. The story begins with Clara’s Grandmother, Juana Cadoret and will fill the entire week.

Clara's Ancestors - Juana (cover)

The original Journal compiled by Florence Gay Osborne

The following bit of family history concerning our grandmother, Clara de Beck Guion, was compiled by my first cousin, Mrs. Florence Gay Osborne, daughter of my Father’s sister, Clara Guion Gay, about 1893. Since then, cousin Florence has died.

Alfred D. Guion

July 8, 1940

Clara's Ancestors - Juana (title page)

Title page

Clara's Ancestors - Juana (1)

Page one

BIOGRAPHY OF CLARA MARIA DE LOS DOLORES MARINA DE BECK GUION

Clara Maria de los Dolores Marina de Beck Guion was a descendent of Mons. Jean Cadoret, a wealthy French nobleman who, about the middle of the 18th century, married Mademoiselle Juana _____________, a widow, whose parents belonged to the nobility of Spain. She (Juana) was probably born in Castile, and when she was seven years of age was betrothed to a Spanish nobleman, many years her senior.

Juana took no pains to conceal the dislike she entertained for her future husband, in spite of his many gifts to her.

On one occasion, she prepared for his next visit to her by filling the seat of the cushioned chair with pins, pointing upward. When he called, the little Juana received him with unusual cordiality – to his great gratification – ushered him into the drawing room and offered him a chair, running quickly away without waiting for him to seat himself, which he did, rising with the utmost haste and with an angry protest to his perspective mother-in-law. The mortified lady ordered the child to be brought into the room, but she was not to be found until a prolonged search revealed her hiding place under a heap of charcoal. To be obliged to appear with face, hands and once white dress in a pitiable plight, was sufficient punishment for the dainty lady who no doubt repented of her misdoings.

Her married life with this gentleman was none too happy, and his early death left her a childless widow.

Mons. Jean Cadoret had been sent into Spain, probably as the Minister from France, where he married Juana and took her to France. Six children were born to them: Katrine, Lorenzo, Francis, Jeanne, Frederick and Josephine, the youngest, who was born in Brittany on June 13, 1780.

Her three sons had been sent to England to be educated. Lorenzo, the eldest, was studying for the ministry in the Church of England. Francis began the study of medicine, but the sight of blood always caused him to faint and he was obliged to give up his studies.

Clara's Ancestors - Juana (4)

The page with the story of Jean Cadoret’s death

Clara's Ancestors - Juana (4a - close-up - Guilliotine)

Close-up of the drawing of a guillotine in the original journal

During the French Revolution, Jean Cadoret, who was an ardent Royalist, while at a public dinner, expressed himself in strong terms in favor of the King. Upon leaving the banquet hall he was met by a gendarme, who, saying “Monsieur est mon prisonier”, hurried him off to prison. He never saw his home again, but after lying in prison for several months, was guillotined. His wife and daughters made several visits to him but they were in danger of arrest and were secreted by friends in a sort of tower near Paris. As soon as possible, arrangements were made for Mme. Juana Cadoret to flee from France. She was concealed in a Cracker Barrel, cushioned and lined, let down secretly from a window and hurried on board a vessel bound for Cuba, where she would be safe under the flag of her native land. She had in Havana, a cousin, the wife of Tacon, a wealthy slave owner, and afterward Governor of Cuba. Mme. Juana Cadoret made a home for herself and in a year sent for her children.

Tomorrow and for the rest of the week, I will continue to post the fascinating story of three very strong women, my Great-Great Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion,  her Mother, Josephine (Cadoret) de Beck, and her Grandmother, Juana Cadoret.

Judy Guion

Special Picture # 365 – Grandpa’s Immediate Ancestors – 1809 – 1884

 Special Pictures are photos that do not pertain directly to the letters I’m posting but are unique and interesting so I want to share them. Enjoy.

The following are pictures of Grandpa’s Grandparents, his Parents and a picture of him at about one year old. These ancestors have very interesting lives.

Clara Maria de los Dolores Marina (de Beck) Guion (Grandpa’s Grandmother) 1819- 1896

The Reverend Elijah Guion (Grandpa’s Grandfather) 1809-1879

Ella (Duryee) Guion (Grandpa’s Mother) 

Alfred Beck Guion (Grandpa’s Father) 1853-1899

Alfred Duryee Guion (at about 1 year old) 1884-1964

Tomorrow, another Special Picture.

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Our Branch of the Family Tree (2) – December 6, 1939

This is the final section of the Duryee Family Tree with additions hand-written by Aunt Betty Duryee.

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Joseph Woodward Duryee fathered five daughters, Mary, Ella (my great-grandmother),  Florence, Lillian and Lizzie (who preferred Betty, Aunt Betty Duryee). 

 

Untitled-3 6

fr: Ella Duryee Guion, Elsie Guion; back: Alfred Duryee Guion, Aunt Mary and Aunt Lillian (Aunt Betty Duryee was probably taking the picture).

You can see Alfred that your genealogy is one of the best, and that you come from a long line of ancestors you can well be proud of. You may have a certain responsibility to live up to, but never forget that it is just a background after all, and that it is the character of the man himself, his life and achievements that really matters in his generation. 

Tomorrow and Sunday, I will continue pictures of the Trumbull House and The End of an Era. 

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Our Branch of the Family Tree (1) – December 6, 1939

This document was created by Aunt Betty Duryee from (possibly) her own research or at least papers belonging to her family.

 

Peabodys and Duryees - Our Branch of the Family Tree (1) - December 6, 1939

Tomorrow, I will be posting the last page of the documents Aunt Betty Duryee sent to Lad while he was working in Venezuela in 1939.

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – History of the Duryee Family – A Note From Aunt Betty Duryee – December 6, 1939

This is a re-post of last week’s letter to Lad from Aunt Betty which included  The History of our Family. I thought I might remind you of the sequence of events leading up to Aunt Betty sending this information to Lad.

Dec. 6, 1939

Dear Alfred,

It occurred to me while I was writing the letter I sent to you on Monday that perhaps you would like a copy of the History of the Duryee Family.

I hunted up my papers and had a copy typewritten.

You will see it was as I said that David (I don’t know who this is but my guess is that he was someone Lad met in Venezuela named David Duryee. Lad may have written to Aunt Betty to see if she know whether they were related.) may be descended from the ancestor mentioned in the paper and I think he also will be interested.  The crest is really not complete, it should have underneath a scroll with the motto (Future Promise) but in French, not English.  But I do not have the complete copy here.

Both on your Grandfather Duryee’s and Guion’s side you have a fine lineage.

Lots of love to you and my best regards to David.

Aunt Betty

The beginning of this history has two pages of illustrious ancestors from France, Holland and Scotland. I am not going to post this information but tomorrow and Friday, I will post  Our branch of the Family Tree, prepared By Aunt Betty Duryee, beginning with our original ancestor,  Joost Durie (Duryer, Duryea or Duryee). He was a French Huguenot who emigrated from Manheim and settled in New Utrecht, Long Island and then moved to Bushwick Long Island.

Judy Guion

Special Picture # 347 – Early Pictures of Arla Mary Peabody (Grandma Arla)

These are the earliest pictures I have of my Grandmother, Arla Mary (Peabody) Guion.

 

Blog - Peabody Girls - scouts

Anne Westlin Peabody, Arla Mary Peabody, Helen Perry Peabody, Dorothy Westlin Peabody

Arla Mary Peabody c. 1911

Arla Mary Peabody c. 1911 probably about 17 or 18.

 

Arla Peabody as the Virgun Mary

Arla Peabody dressed as The Virgin Mary for the Church Pageant where Grandpa really SAW her for the first time and fell in love.

 

SOL-Arla Mary Peabody - wedding picture

Arla Mary Peabody, probably taken for her wedding announcement in the paper in 1913.

Tomorrow, I will begin posting letters written in the fall of 1945. Lad has come home from France, Dan has married a French girl in Calais, France, Ced is still in Anchorage, Alaska, Jean has travelled to Santaliza, Brazil, to be with her husband, Dick and Dave is in Okinawa (for now).

Judy Guion