My Ancestors (38 and 39) – Marian Edith Rider and Mowry Addison Irwin

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (2) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (3) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (4) Judith Anne Guion

Homer Marchant Rider married Edith May Lewis on 29 July 1885 at Rider’s Ranch (near Coralitas, CA)

Their children were as follows:

  1. Homer Allen Rider, ,b. 8 Aug 1887 at the Rider Ranch
  2. Marian Edith Rider, b.  15 Oct 1888 at Santa Cruz
  3. Louise Rider, b.  12 Sept 1890 at Westport, CA
  4. Child died at birth
  5. Delo Margaret Rider, b. 7 Dec 1898 at Watsonville, CA
  6. Donald Lewis Rider, b. 16 Aug 1901

Marian Edith Rider was born 15 Oct 1888 at Santa Cruz, CA

She married Mowry Addison Irwin on 28 July 1914 in Watsonville, CA

Mowry Addison Irwin was born in Erie, PA on 16 Oct 1888

Mowry Addison Irwin, Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin, Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion and Alfred Peabody Guion 

They had the following children:

Marian Dunlap Irwin and Homer Addison Irwin about 1920

1.  Marian Dunlap Irwin, born 11 Nov 1915 in Sacramento, CA

2.  Homer Addison Irwin, born 24 April 1917 in Marysville, CA

3.  Margaret Edith Irwin, born 28  May 1920 in Oakland, CA

4.  Donald Mowry Irwin, born 3 July 1925 in Albuquerque,NM

Mowry Addison Irwin passed away on 10 May 1947.  He was a resident of Berkeley for 10 years.  Mr. Irwin and his family had moved to Orinda in 1940.  He was President last year and a Director this year of the Orinda Association and was instrumental in helping to start the Orinda News, a community newspaper.  He was employed for the past 15 years by the Westinghouse Wholesale Sales Co.

Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin passed away 8 June 1958.

Next Sunday I will be posting more information about Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion, my Mother. 

Tomorrow I will be posting a week of the memories of Grandpa and Grandma Guion’s children during their time in Trumbull.

Judy Guion 

 

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My Ancestors (36 and 37) – Edith May Lewis and Homer Marchant Rider continued

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (2) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (3) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (4) Judith Anne Guion

Edith May (Lewis) Rider

The following is a section of a letter written by Edith May Lewis to her daughter, Marian Rider Irwin, my mother’s mother, when she (Edith May Lewis) was in her 80s.

Grandpa Rider’s name was Dickamon Allen Rider.  He was from near Bennington, Vermont – and his older brother was Homer Rider – he had dark, very curly hair from picture – I think like Don’s ( my mother’s brother, Donald Irwin).  Mrs. Harnell, who knew the Riders when they came 1st to Cal. – Said Homer was a very nice looking boy – I think they were 22, 20 and 18 – Homer, Dick and Jesse.  She was very fond of Homer – said he was always kind – thoughtful – so neat and clean – and that the pictures didn’t look at all like him – except for the curly hair – He was drowned in the Feather River (I think it was) tho’ he was a very good swimmer.  The youngest was not well – so he went back home and later settled in Chicago.  The Harnell’s were from N.Y. state, very close to the Vermont line – where the Riders lived – I think the 3 – anyway the two older ones – boarded with them – She (Mrs. H.) was at the ranch for a visit when Alice was a baby

Mine is: born June 21, 1863 – Blue Earth Co., Minnesota

My father, John Jackson Lewis was born April 27, 1825 in Delaware.

My mother, Margaret Ann Wilde was born August 22, 1844 in New York City

Margaret Ann Wilde’s parents were William Wilde born in New York State.  He married Joanne Burke, born in England in 1825.  I will continue to read through the information from various members of my mother’s family together more information about these and other individuals.  I have a document that needs further research but it claims that the riders were descendants of William Bradford, Governor of Massachusetts from 1621 to 1650.  When I can verify the details I will let you know.

Tomorrow I will begin posting a week of letters written in 1944.  At this point all 5 boys are in the service of Uncle Sam.  Grandpa continues his weekly letters keeping everyone informed about the lives of his sons who are away from home. 

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (36 and 37)- Edith May Lewis and Homer Marchant Rider

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (2) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (3) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (4) Judith Anne Guion

Edith May (DeDe) (Lewis) Rider

 

Homer Marchant Rider

 

John Jackson Lewis married Margaret Ann Wilde (b.  August 22 or 24, 1844 in New York City, New York).

The children of John Jackson Lewis and Margaret Ann Wilde:

  1. Edith May Lewis, born June 21, 1863 in Sterling Center, Minnesota
  2. Alice Jackson Lewis, born September 28, 1866, Sterling Center Minnesota.
  3. William Edward Lewis born October 24, 1868, Pontiac, Illinois.
  4. Frank J. Lewis born February 6, 1871, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  5. Charles Bertrum Lewis born April 8, 1872, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  6. Margaret Lewis, died May 25, 1876 as an infant in Watsonville, California.

Dickamon Allen Rider (b. 17 Dec 1832, Bennington, VT) married Cordelia Eliza Pratt (b.5 Nov 1842, Kaosauqua (or Keokuk Iowa) on 1 Jan 1863, Grass Valley, CA).

Their children were:

  1. Homer Marchant Rider (b. 6 Jan 1869, Nicolaus, CA)
  2. Frank L. Rider
  3. Clara May (Rider) Madiera
  4. Jesse Mildred

Homer Marchant Rider married Edith May Lewis on 29 July 1885 at Rider’s Ranch (near Coralitas, CA)

Their children were as follows:

  1. Homer Allen Rider, ,b. 8 Aug 1887 at the Rider Ranch
  • Marian Edith Rider, b.  15 Oct 1888 at Santa Cruz
  • Louise Rider, b.  12 Sept 1890 at Westport, CA
  • Child died at birth
  • Delo Margaret Rider, b. 7 Dec 1898 at Watsonville, CA
  • Donald Lewis Rider, b. 16 Aug 1901

Next week, I will post information on Marian Edith Rider, my Grandmother and Mowry Addison Irwin, my Grandfather.

Tomorrow I will begin a week of posting letters written in 1943. We Are getting very close to the marriage of Lad (Alfred) and Marian Irwin, my Mom and Dad.

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (34) and (35) – Enoch Lewis (1776 – 1856) and John Jackson Lewis (1825 – 1919)

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

  • Enoch Lewis; (2) John Jackson Lewis; (3) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (4) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (5) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (6) Judith Anne Guion

Enoch Lewis was born January 29, 1776 in Radnor (Chester Co.), Pennsylvania.  He married Lydia Jackson, born April 27, 1825.  They had several children, the oldest, John Jackson Lewis was born April 27, 1825, in Wilmington, (New Castle Co.), Delaware.  two other sons were named Edward and William.

John Jackson Lewis was 25 years old when he embarked on his Voyage to California to visit his brother William in 1851.  William had a farm in San Jose, California.  (See Category “Voyage to California” on my blog:  greatestgenerationlessons.wordpress.com)

John Jackson Lewis married Margaret Ann Wilde (b.  August 22 or 24, 1844 in New York City, New York).

The children of John Jackson Lewis and Margaret Ann Wilde:

  1. Edith May Lewis, born June 21, 1863 in Sterling Center, Minnesota
  2. Alice Jackson Lewis, born September 28, 1866, Sterling Center Minnesota.
  3. William Edward Lewis born October 24, 1868, Pontiac, Illinois.
  4. Frank J. Lewis born February 6, 1871, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  5. 5 Charles Bertrum Lewis born April 8, 1872, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  6. Margaret Lewis, died May 25, 1876 as an infant in Watsonville, California.

This isn’t very much on these two ancestors but I intend to keep looking for more information. With all the information online, I should be able to find out a bit more.

Tomorrow and for the rest of the week, I’ll continue with the detailed descriptions found in the Log Book of the Helen.

Judy Guion

Voyage to California (43c) – John Jackson Lewis – More of the San Jose Valley

This is the last section of the final letter from John Jackson Lewis. This one is  to Edward, dated May 8th, 1851, describing the San Jose Valley and what he can see from his brother William’s farm. This sketch was made by John Jackson Lewis and enclosed with the letter.

 

Turning our gaze up the valley towards Monterey, the timber prevents our seeing much of the low land, except in the immediate vicinity of our house, that is within two or three miles, but beyond the timber, and distant, perhaps, five or six miles, the hills, comparatively low, but high notwithstanding, indicate that the valley becomes much narrower, and changes its course very materially.  Looking towards the Bay, the mountains fade away on either side, leaving us one place where we can look out on what I shall call the real horizon.

On the plain, in this direction, there is nothing essentially different from what is visible in other directions.  The same vast fields of grass and flowers, interspersed with spots of timber, or lines of it along the streams.  The timber on the plain is almost exclusively white and live oak, but in some places, dense thickets of Willows border the streams.

Distances on the plain are very deceptive.  This day two weeks, after sitting and writing a considerable portion of the day, I felt desirous to take a walk before supper, and pitching on a timbered spots, which I supposed, after making all due allowances, to be about a mile distant, as the extent of my excursion.  Pointing it out to Wm., I asked him if it was much more than a mile distant.  He replied in the negative, and I started.  The sun, I suppose, was about an hour high, and as I walked and walked towards the trees, the sun appeared to be making almost equal haste toward the horizon.  I reached the trees, however, and found several of them to be splendid Live Oaks, with lots of magpies, blackbirds, woodpeckers, and hanging birds hopping about them or flying from tree to tree, making the air vocal with their notes.  I stayed but a short time, and started back on a tall walk; but the sun had gone to rest; in the dusk of evening was upon me as I approached our humble abode.

I met with another rather curious instance of this deceptiveness.  Nearly all of the farm, (as will be explained more fully hereafter) is open to the plains, and the cattle that roam over them will occasionally trespass upon the land under cultivation.  In driving them off one day, I picked up a clod and threw at one that I thought very near to me, but, to my astonishment, it fell considerably short of its object.  I threw again, harder, but it still fell short, and it was only after repeated trials that I found how much harder I had to throw in order to hit anything that I had been accustomed to doing.  One reason of the deceptiveness in this instance was probably the being out of practice of throwing, for two or three months, reasons for other cases are perhaps found in the clearness of the atmosphere and the background of the mountains.  The rectangular figure on my map, near the Monterey Road and on a branch of the Guadalupe Bay, is where Wm. and his partners were farming last year.  one of them, Capt. Winslow, is on it this year.  He rents it, I believe, at $30. per acre.

 

This concludes the entries of the Diary and Journal of John Jackson Lewis concerning his voyage from New York to California to visit his brother William.

My Mother’s Ancestors will be the next series I post on Sundays. Here is a picture of Edith May Lewis, daughter of John Jackson Lewis and Margaret Ann Wilde.

Edith May (DeDe) Lewis, daughter of John Jackson Lewis.

 

This picture is of Homer Marchant Rider, Edith May’s husband.

Next Saturday I will begin a series of posts concerning Lad’s Voyage to Venezuela, taking a similar route as John Jackson Lewis during the first portion of his journey, about 88 years later.

Tomorrow my final post about My Ancestor, Alfred Peabody Guion. This will be quotes from the Memory Book that was passed around during the Celebration of Life held for Al (Lad) and Marian Guion.

Next week I will begin a week of letters written in 1944 while all five of Grandpa’s boys were scattered arount the world in the service of Uncle Sam.

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (33j) – Alfred Peabody Guion – Trumbull and Their Move to California

 

Marian and Lad Guion

For Lad and Marian Guion life in Trumbull was probably typical for families of that generation in a small town.  My Dad worked for the Frouge Construction Company in Bridgeport, Connecticut, through my high school years and beyond.

The Trumbull Congregational Church played a large part in our lives.  Both Lad and Marian sang in the choir.  When I was old enough I joined the Junior Choir and moved on to the Senior Choir when I went to high school.  My father grew up in the church along with many of his friends.  Their families were also active in the church.  My father, Uncle Dan and Uncle Ced sang in the Chandler Chorus and this group had gatherings for their members on numerous occasions.  At one picnic, my cousin and best friend and I stole a can of black olives, opened it and ate the whole can.  We still laugh about that.  I remember Christmas performances, Easter Sunrise services, Junior and Senior Pilgrim Youth Fellowship groups, weekend Retreats and the Strawberry Festival. My siblings and I participated in these events along with the children of Mom and Dad’s friends.

As mentioned in a previous post, Marian started a Kindergarten School with her close friend Jeanne (Hughes) Hayden, who grew up with my father.  They closed the school after the town of Trumbull started offering Kindergarten classes in their grammar schools.  Marian was very active in the Parent Teacher’s Association and was also elected to the Board of Education and served on the Construction Committee for Trumbull’s first Middle School.  She worked as an Enumerator for the Census Bureau during several of the Decennial Censuses.  I now work as a Permanent Part-time employee of the Census Bureau.  It has changed quite a bit since Mom worked for them.

Alfred Duryee Guion, 1884 – 1964

In the fall of 1964 Grandpa passed away at the age of eighty.  The Trumbull house was sold to Uncle Dan and Aunt Paulette and their family of eight moved into the section of the house that we had been living in.  Uncle Dave and Aunt Eleanor bought a house in Stratford and moved there with their two children.  My family moved into their apartment which was situated in the oldest section of the house.  I was off to college and came home occasionally on weekends.  My twin brother was drafted into the Army.

In 1966, the Frouge Construction Company was in the process of purchasing a large tract of land on the Pacific coast, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge.  Their plans were to build a community around the small bay and up the surrounding hills.  They sent Lad and Marian to California.  My younger brother, by only a year and half, and my sister, who had just graduated from high school, drove out to California with them.  My Dad’s job was to start clearing land for the proposed project. Mom and Dad found a nice apartment in a condominium complex and were quite happy.

Lad and Marian Guion in California

After driving out to California my brother returned to Connecticut to be drafted into the Army.  My sister went to college, married and provided Mom and Dad with their first grandchild.  After two years of college in Connecticut, I decided not to transfer to California but to complete my education in Connecticut.  I missed my family but I knew even then that I was a Connecticut Yankee through and through.

After about two years the proposed project died.  My Dad was hired as the Resident Handyman for the entire condominium complex.  He was very happy helping the residents and making repairs and improvements to the complex.

In California, Mom got a job with the Board of Education in a town across the Bay. She continued to work for many years.  Dad and Mom became active members of two different groups.

Marian and Lad wearing their Marin Ambler Vests

 

Lad and Marian at an Ambler Weekend – a fun side of them that I didn’t know in Trumbull

The first was an RV group called The Marin Amblers.  At least once a month the group would travel to some campground and enjoy a weekend of fellowship with friends.

Lad and Marian at a Marin Power Squadron dinner

The second group was the Marin Chapter of the Power Squadron.  Dad had been a member of a Connecticut Chapter and transferred his membership.  Both Mom and Dad became very active and served as officers at various times during their thirty-five years in California.

Next Sunday I’ll post the final chapter of Lad and Marian’s life together.

Tomorrow I’ll begin posting a week of the childhood memories of Grandpa’s and Grandma’s children.

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (33i) – Alfred Peabody Guion – Married Years in Trumbull

Last June I  read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Alfred Peabody Guion; (2) Judith Anne Guion.

From Life history of Alfred P. Guion:

Dec. 1945 – present (April, 1946)     Trumbull, Conn. – Reconditioning property, working with Guion Adv.

When my father returned to the United States in August of 1945, he spent about two and a half months stationed in Aberdeen and Fort Meade, Maryland.  He was close enough to come home most weekends to be with Marian, his wife of two years.  After he was discharged in December, he used his handyman skills to make repairs and improvements to the Trumbull property and also helped Grandpa in his business, Guion Advertising Company, with office space in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

At Christmas, in 1945, Lad and Marian announced to Grandpa and the family that they were expecting their first child in July 1946.  They had no idea until the delivery date of June 28th that Marian was actually carrying twins.  She gave birth to a son, Douglas, and a daughter, Judith.  The way I heard the story was that Mom was on her way out of the delivery room when she realized that something was going on.  The doctor took her back into the delivery room and everyone, including the doctor, was surprised when I appeared.

Fourteen months later another son, Gregory, arrived and a second daughter, Marian Lynn, arrived sixteen months after that.  Lad and Marian now had four children under the age of two and a half.  Since I had twins when my oldest was three, I can begin to imagine what life must have been like for them.

In 1950, when I was about four years old, some alterations were made to the Big House, dividing it into three separate living quarters.  Grandpa had a small apartment with the kitchen and living room downstairs and a bedroom upstairs.

Lad and Marian moved from the Little House to the Big House.  They had a kitchen big enough to include a dining room table, a living room, an enclosed porch and two bedrooms upstairs, one large enough for all four children in bunk beds.

Dave and his new wife Eleanor moved into the oldest portion of the Big House.  They had a kitchen, dining room and living room on the first floor and two bedrooms upstairs.

Dan and Paulette, who had only two children at this time, moved into the Little House.  This house had a kitchen, dining room, living room and bedroom on the first floor and two bedrooms upstairs.

I have some memories of the house before the alterations and I have one picture in my mind when the work was being done.

Judy, Greg and Doug on the Island

 

Lynn on the Island

When Doug and I were probably about four or five, we went up to the Island with Grandpa.  I think it may have been the first time my family went up there, and that was because my little sister was out of diapers.  My Mom and Dad decided to stay on the Island for a while.  My father got a job (doing what, I don’t know) somewhere on the mainland.  In the late afternoon, Grandpa would get Doug, Greg and myself into the rowboat and row us to the mainland beach.  We would walk down the winding dirt road until we saw Dad’s car approaching.  We would all climb in and Dad would drive us back to the beach.  Then he would row us back to the Island.  I think we stayed until sometime in October but came back to Trumbull because we didn’t have any warm clothes.

I have not found anything written about my father’s work at this time.  I do remember that for several years he managed (owned?)  the local Atlantic service station.  I remember that my Dad would come home and have supper with us.  Then he would sit down and read the newspaper before going back to the station to complete repairs on various automobiles.  He was an excellent mechanic and was kept quite busy.

Dave told me an interesting story about this time when I was recording his childhood memories.

One more thought when your father, Al, had a gas station in Trumbull.  I don’t have witnesses but I think Ced told the story.  Somebody came in one day, knowing what a great diagnostician your father was, came in and said, “You hear it?  Something is wrong with my car.  Can you hear that noise?”  Your father, without saying a word, turned around and walked away.  “Well, what is this?  Here I am, asking a question, and the guy ignores me and just walks away”.  He was about ready to take off when your father comes back and he says, “I think the problem is …”, But he never told the guy he was going off to think about what to say.

Marian, like most women at this time, was a stay-at-home mom.  She was active in our church, singing in the choir and teaching Sunday school.  She was also a brownie and Girl Scout leader for me and a Cub Scout leader for my brothers.  My Dad also sang in the choir.

The next job I remember my father having was working for the Frouge Construction Company in Bridgeport.  He maintained their fleet of trucks and other construction vehicles.  I don’t know exactly when he started but I know he worked for them throughout my high school years and even for a while after they moved to California.

When Doug and I were old enough for Kindergarten, my mother found out that Trumbull did not have kindergarten classes.  I’m sure this surprised her because she had gone to kindergarten in California many years before.  She and her good friend, Jeanne (Hughes) Hayden, got together and decided that they would start a Kindergarten using our church education center.  They started the following year with one class, which included my brother Greg and Jeanne’s daughter, Debbie, with both women teaching.  By the time Trumbull started kindergarten classes in all their schools and the kindergarten at our church was closed, I believe they had four classes and eight teachers, but it could have been three classed and six teachers.

Next Sunday I will continue the story of lad, Marian and their children. 

Tomorrow I will begin posting a week of letters written in 1944. 

Judy Guion