Trumbull – Dear Elsie – Family History Concerning Our Grandmother – Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion (4) – July 8, 1940

This letter from Grandpa to his sister, Elsie May Guion, included news of the death and funeral of a close family friend which I will not include, and the very interesting Biography of their Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion. The story begins with Clara’s Grandmother, Juana Cadoret and will fill the entire week.

The page of the Journal where Clara’s marriage to Elijah Guion

A sketch of the marriage Certificate and a Bible

She (Josephine de Beck) was a wealthy woman and henceforth her life, as well as her mother’s (Juana Cadoret), was devoted to her two children. Their home was furnished with every luxury and the children were surrounded with all the evidence of wealth and refinement. Mme. Cadoret was already of great culture and dignity and her influence upon her grandchildren was not small.

When little Clara was five years of age she fell one day while playing, and fractured one of the bones in her ankle. Before she had recovered she was seized with the measles and all of the humor of the disease seemed to center itself in the wounded ankle. For seven years the child was entirely unable to walk. The wound was treated most severely causing her, at many times, great agony. She was strapped to a cot while the wound was burned with caustic until, at last, a hole was formed which reached through the bone, but all treatment was unavailing and the physicians told her mother that amputation was all that was left.

To this, Mme. de Beck would not consent, and when a trip to America was suggested, she seized the idea at once and brought the child to the United States where, in about a year, she recovered the use of her foot. During all this time her education had not been neglected. She was taught with great care and was lifted from her sofa to the piano stool to practice when her health would permit.

A lawsuit had been pending when Mme. de Beck left Cuba. This was decided against her and she lost her wealth. She had been boarding in the school where Clara was a pupil, and the latter now gave lessons in the school to support herself and her mother.

After some time had elapsed she met a gentleman,  and an attachment was formed. Her mother forbade the engagement without giving a reason. Clara, while acceding to her mother’s wishes, could not remain with her.

The page in the Journal where Clara’s marriage is recorded

A sketch of the Marriage Certificate and a Bible

She (Clara) offered herself as a teacher in a large school, was accepted and arrangements were made for her to enter upon her duties at once. The principal promised to send his secretary, Mr. Elijah Guion (my great-grandfather)  to escort her to the school. Claira then told her mother of her plans and although her mother entreated her to withdraw from the agreement, it was too late. At the appointed time she was met by Mr. Guion, escorted to the school and there she began her work. In the course of time Mr. Guion won her consent to accompany him upon the journey through life and on January 2, 1840 they were married in New York.

Tomorrow, the final portion of this journal, which has recorded some of the major life events of three fascinating and courageous women.

Judy Guion

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Trumbull – Dear Elsie – Family History Concerning Our Grandmother – Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion (2) – July 8, 1940

This letter from Grandpa to his sister, Elsie May Guion, included news of the death and funeral of a close family friend which I will not include, and the very interesting Biography of their Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion. The story begins with Clara’s Grandmother, Juana Cadoret and will fill the entire week.

Her three sons had been sent to England before their father’s arrest, to be educated. Lorenzo, the eldest, was studying for the Ministry in the Church of England. Francis began the study of medecine, but the sight of blood always caused him to faint, and he was obliged to give up his studies.

A ship was bought, named by the new owners “Les Trois Soeurs”, and placed in the charge of a friendly captain. The vessel narrowly escaped being seized by the government, but the six children succeeded in reaching it with the governess without being detected. The vessel at once left port and the unfortunate family had soon bid adieu forever to their native land.

Sketch of the Island in the Journal

The voyage was begun in time for them to reach Cuba in the fall before the yellow fever should begin. They were delayed, however, by contrary winds, and when about three leagues from the island of Las Noevitas, in the old Bahama Channel, they met stormy weather. The passengers awoke one morning to find the vessel on one side. A strong wind from the Gulfstream arose every day and there was every prospect that the vessel would capsize. The passengers took their clothing and jewels, and were placed in a small boat, with biscuits and water, and rowed to the island. It was inhabited only by wild animals, to avoid which they climbed the trees. They hoisted a flag of distress, and on the morning of the third day, discovered a sail. They experienced great anxiety lest their signal should not be seen, but it was noticed and the vessel came to their rescue. She proved to be an American ship from New York, bound for Cuba. The captain –Hicks – treated them with Christian kindness, set a sumptuous table for them, and landed them safely in Cuba where Juana Cadoret gladly welcomed her children whom she had given up for lost. The voyage had taken six months and they had arrived in the midst of the dreaded yellow fever season.

The mother at once sent them with their governess to Philadelphia where the girls were placed in a boarding school on Chestnut Street. A week after their arrival, Frederick, the youngest son, was assassinated in the street, being mistaken for someone else. The two oldest girls, with their governess, disliked the climate and were dissatisfied and unhappy, and at the end of six months the whole family, with the exception of Josephine, returned to Cuba. They scarcely landed before the governess and the two young men, the older of whom was about 24, died of yellow fever. The sisters were smitten with the fever, but recovered. Afterwards, Katrine married Mons. Noel ______, a French physician, who died leaving her two children, Hypolyte who followed in his father’s profession, and Roseline.

Jane (Jeanne) married a Spanish gentleman, who rendered her life miserable because of his mad jealousy of her beauty. At the end of four or five years he was obliged to be away from his wife for a few hours, and having finished his business, started for home, in spite of a furious storm, so fearful was he to leave his wife alone. When but a few miles from his home he was struck by lightning and killed. His rider less horse reached home and a search was made for his master, whose lifeless body was discovered on the ground.

Tomorrow and for the rest of the week, I will continue the story of three remarkable women, my Great Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion, her Mother, Josephine (Cadoret) de Beck and her Grandmother, Juana Cadoret.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Elsie – Family History Concerning Our Grandmother – Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion (1) – July 8, 1940

This letter from Grandpa to his sister, Elsie May Guion, included news of the death and funeral of a close family friend which I will not include, and the very interesting Biography of their Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion. The story begins with Clara’s Grandmother, Juana Cadoret and will fill the entire week.

Clara's Ancestors - Juana (cover)

The original Journal compiled by Florence Gay Osborne

The following bit of family history concerning our grandmother, Clara de Beck Guion, was compiled by my first cousin, Mrs. Florence Gay Osborne, daughter of my Father’s sister, Clara Guion Gay, about 1893. Since then, cousin Florence has died.

Alfred D. Guion

July 8, 1940

Clara's Ancestors - Juana (title page)

Title page

Clara's Ancestors - Juana (1)

Page one

BIOGRAPHY OF CLARA MARIA DE LOS DOLORES MARINA DE BECK GUION

Clara Maria de los Dolores Marina de Beck Guion was a descendent of Mons. Jean Cadoret, a wealthy French nobleman who, about the middle of the 18th century, married Mademoiselle Juana _____________, a widow, whose parents belonged to the nobility of Spain. She (Juana) was probably born in Castile, and when she was seven years of age was betrothed to a Spanish nobleman, many years her senior.

Juana took no pains to conceal the dislike she entertained for her future husband, in spite of his many gifts to her.

On one occasion, she prepared for his next visit to her by filling the seat of the cushioned chair with pins, pointing upward. When he called, the little Juana received him with unusual cordiality – to his great gratification – ushered him into the drawing room and offered him a chair, running quickly away without waiting for him to seat himself, which he did, rising with the utmost haste and with an angry protest to his perspective mother-in-law. The mortified lady ordered the child to be brought into the room, but she was not to be found until a prolonged search revealed her hiding place under a heap of charcoal. To be obliged to appear with face, hands and once white dress in a pitiable plight, was sufficient punishment for the dainty lady who no doubt repented of her misdoings.

Her married life with this gentleman was none too happy, and his early death left her a childless widow.

Mons. Jean Cadoret had been sent into Spain, probably as the Minister from France, where he married Juana and took her to France. Six children were born to them: Katrine, Lorenzo, Francis, Jeanne, Frederick and Josephine, the youngest, who was born in Brittany on June 13, 1780.

Her three sons had been sent to England to be educated. Lorenzo, the eldest, was studying for the ministry in the Church of England. Francis began the study of medicine, but the sight of blood always caused him to faint and he was obliged to give up his studies.

Clara's Ancestors - Juana (4)

The page with the story of Jean Cadoret’s death

Clara's Ancestors - Juana (4a - close-up - Guilliotine)

Close-up of the drawing of a guillotine in the original journal

During the French Revolution, Jean Cadoret, who was an ardent Royalist, while at a public dinner, expressed himself in strong terms in favor of the King. Upon leaving the banquet hall he was met by a gendarme, who, saying “Monsieur est mon prisonier”, hurried him off to prison. He never saw his home again, but after lying in prison for several months, was guillotined. His wife and daughters made several visits to him but they were in danger of arrest and were secreted by friends in a sort of tower near Paris. As soon as possible, arrangements were made for Mme. Juana Cadoret to flee from France. She was concealed in a Cracker Barrel, cushioned and lined, let down secretly from a window and hurried on board a vessel bound for Cuba, where she would be safe under the flag of her native land. She had in Havana, a cousin, the wife of Tacon, a wealthy slave owner, and afterward Governor of Cuba. Mme. Juana Cadoret made a home for herself and in a year sent for her children.

Tomorrow and for the rest of the week, I will continue to post the fascinating story of three very strong women, my Great-Great Grandmother, Clara Maria de los Delores Marina de Beck Guion,  her Mother, Josephine (Cadoret) de Beck, and her Grandmother, Juana Cadoret.

Judy Guion

Special Picture # 365 – Grandpa’s Immediate Ancestors – 1809 – 1884

 Special Pictures are photos that do not pertain directly to the letters I’m posting but are unique and interesting so I want to share them. Enjoy.

The following are pictures of Grandpa’s Grandparents, his Parents and a picture of him at about one year old. These ancestors have very interesting lives.

Clara Maria de los Dolores Marina (de Beck) Guion (Grandpa’s Grandmother) 1819- 1896

The Reverend Elijah Guion (Grandpa’s Grandfather) 1809-1879

Ella (Duryee) Guion (Grandpa’s Mother) 

Alfred Beck Guion (Grandpa’s Father) 1853-1899

Alfred Duryee Guion (at about 1 year old) 1884-1964

Tomorrow, another Special Picture.

Judy Guion

Special Picture # 360 – The First Thanksgiving and Ancestors – 1621

Years ago I had seen this print at the Plymouth Plantation Museum but they were sold out and I could not get one.  I was recently reminded of it and went online to search for it. I found it and ordered it from the Plymouth Plantation Museum and had it framed to show my daughters and grandchildren on Thanksgiving.

The First Thanksgiving - 1621

The First Thanksgiving - 1621 (cropped 2)

                                                   1            2                                                              3

1 – Directly above the number, at the head of the table, is Governor William Bradford, an ancestor of mine (and my daughters and their children) from my mother’s side of the family.

2 – Above the number, behind the woman in white and the children, with his back to us and in a brown jacket, offering a platter of food, is George Soule, an ancestor of my daughters (and my grandchildren), from their father’s side of the family.

3 – Above the number, with his back to us wearing a grey jacket and pants, talking to some Indians, is Richard Warren, an ancestor of my daughters (and my grandchildren), from their father’s side of the family.

The First Thanksgiving - About the Painting

Needless to say, it was a big hit. One thing I am grateful for is the faith, bravery, fortitude, stamina and perseverance of these men, because without them, my family and I would not exist.

Judy Guion

Peabodys and Duryees – Our Branch of the Family Tree (2) – December 6, 1939

This is the final section of the Duryee Family Tree with additions hand-written by Aunt Betty Duryee.

img20211020_23274336

Joseph Woodward Duryee fathered five daughters, Mary, Ella (my great-grandmother),  Florence, Lillian and Lizzie (who preferred Betty, Aunt Betty Duryee). 

 

Untitled-3 6

fr: Ella Duryee Guion, Elsie Guion; back: Alfred Duryee Guion, Aunt Mary and Aunt Lillian (Aunt Betty Duryee was probably taking the picture).

You can see Alfred that your genealogy is one of the best, and that you come from a long line of ancestors you can well be proud of. You may have a certain responsibility to live up to, but never forget that it is just a background after all, and that it is the character of the man himself, his life and achievements that really matters in his generation. 

Tomorrow and Sunday, I will continue pictures of the Trumbull House and The End of an Era. 

Judy Guion

Trumbull – Dear Santa Claus (4) – A Letter From Dan About an Adventure – December 3, 1939

This letter from Dan to his older brother is typed on the back of Grandpa’s 3-page letter.

DBG - Dan (cropped) fron Ced, Dan and car - 1941

Daniel Beck Guion

ye El pueblito de Trumbull

Dec. 3

Que tal. chico,

Tenga una amiga en Valencia qui  escribe a mi de quando en quando. En la ultima carta yo le dije a me ella que si usted _ra a Valencia se puede visitarla. Ella se llama Carol Ravell. Su direccion esta Auto Mundial, Valencia. Es muy amiga mia. Le encontre a ella en el vapor Santa Paula en Julio.

 On Thanksgiving Day, while nuestro padre busied himself en la cochina, Ced, Barbie (Plumb, Dan’s girlfriend), Jean (Mortensen, Dick’s girlfriend), Don Whitney y yo set out in your Packard for Greenfield Hill.Every Thanksgiving Day the Fairfield Country Hounds dress up in their round just bowlers and mount their most stalwart steeds for a bit of tally-ho before dinner. I have enclosed some actual photographs of the affair clipped from the Sunday Post.

They started from the Green, led by the hounds who, I am told, were pursuing a real fox.  We dashed from road to road in a perpetual attempt to intercept the hunt as it wandered from hill to veil in pursuit of the elusive animal.  It was quite a colorful affair.  All the officials were in red coats.  The rest wore Derby hats, held on by black silk ribbons clipped to the back of the brim.

In an excess of spirit we set off on a rough dirt road and were rather surprised when the front spring (not the one which I had noticed earlier!) was completely severed.  We could go forward, but not in reverse.  We parked in the road while we made a last attempt to locate the horseman before starting for home.  I became conscious of a desire to perform a natural process (liquid), and, to avoid the embarrassment of pardoning myself from the two gals present, I wandered absently I head on the old dirt road as if I were looking for the horses ….. A sort of (“see a man about a horse”) proposition with more truth than usual.  As my crank-case drained I became aware of a pattering of pause approaching along the road, but I could not see until it flashed interview from behind the convenient privet hedge that I was (and I swear this is the truth, so help me, and I have witnesses) the Fox! it was going like the much-expressed hammers of hell, only more so.  It glanced neither to the right or left.  There was no sign of pursuit, but that Fox was laying down its feet in the most purposeful manner possible, and it was heading straight toward the Packard! 

I started running after it, yelling to the rest of the gang who were standing near the car, “Here comes the Fox! Here comes the Fox!”, and just before Reynard reached the car, he caught sight of them, for he swerved suddenly, cleared the low stone wall which bordered the road in a single bound, then sped across the field out of sight.

Two Horsemen, cantering slowly along the road from the direction from which the fox had come, evidently on their way home from the hunt, passed us, and I said, “We have a broken spring, and we just saw the fox go by!”

“Oh, yea?” one of the man replied, and I suddenly realized that my story might receive the same treatment everywhere.  But all the gang saw clearly that it was a genuine fox, and, although he did not tarry (the fox, I mean) long enough to tell us whether or not he was THE fox, or merely a casual chicken killer from the surrounding countryside, we were satisfied that, since we had come to see a Fox-Hunt, we had not come in vain.

The spring replacement cost $17.49.

                                                                            Bueno, pues,

                                                                                            Dan

Tomorrow I will be posting a letter from Aunt Betty Duryee, with some information regarding the Duryee ancestors and her account of Thanksgiving.

Judy Guion

 

 

Special Picture # 346 – Early Pictures of Alfred Duryee Guion (Grandpa) 1886 – 1905

Early pictures of Grtandpa, who’s life changed drastically when his Father, Alfred Beck Guion, passed away at the age of 45. The Lincoln Avenue house had to be sold and the family moved to Dell Avenue. Three of Ella’s sisters moved in with them to help with the finances. Grandpa went to work to help support the family.

ADG - Alfred Duryee Guion at about 1 yr old in 1885

Alfred Duryee Guion circa 1886 (Grandpa was born in September, 1884)

ADG - Alfred Duryee Guion and Elsie May Guion about 1995

Alfred Duryee and his sister, Elsie May Guion at the Lincoln Avenue House (prior to 1899 when their Father passed away)

Back row: Alfred Duryee Guion, his Aunt ______ and Aunt Lizzie (also known as Aunt Betty) in the Dell Avenue house, front row: Ella (Duryee) Guion, Elsie May Guion

Tomorrow, another Special Picture.

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (57 and 58) Jennings Rider and Sally Allen and (59 and 60) Dickerman Allen Rider and Almira Lillie and (61 and 62) Dickamon Allen Rider and Cordelia Pratt

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them. 

Governor William Bradford; (2) Joseph Bradford; (3)Elisha Bradford; (4)Laurana Bradford; (5) Hannah McFarland; (6) Jennings Rider; (8)Dickerman Allen Rider; (9) Dickamon Allen Rider; (10) Marian Edith Rider; (11) Marian Dunlap Irwin; (12)Judith Anne Guion

Two weeks ago, as I was going through the Lewis, Rider, Irwin folder where I started collecting information on these families in 1975, I came across a piece of paper that I had either forgotten about or did not notice.  It was sent to me by my mother’s sister, Margaret (Irwin) Mitchell Sedberry.  Her note at the bottom says, “This is from Virginia Rider, and she wrote, “You are now Mayflower descendants.”

I had known that my three daughters were Mayflower descendants through their father but never knew of my connection.  Needless to say I went exploring on the Internet.  I will be following this line from Governor William Bradford to Dickamon (various records have different spellings for this name) Allen Rider (1832 – 1904), whose descendants I have covered on previous Sundays.

 

(1) Jennings Rider; (2) Dickeman Allen Rider; (3) Dickamon Allen Rider, (4) Homer Marchant Rider; (5) Marian Edith  (Rider) Irwin; (56 Mairian Dunlop (Irwin) Guion; (7) Judith Anne Guion.

Jennings Rider, the only Child I have found from the marriage of Caleb Rider and Hannah (McFarland) Rider, was born in 1780. He married Sally Allen (1783-1869) )August 3, 1806 in Whitingham, Vermont.  Their children follow:

  1. Alvin Rider (1807-deceased)
  2.  Dickerman Allen Rider (1808-1899)
  3. Moses Rider (1810-deceased)
  4. Arabella Rider (1812-1813)
  5. Isaac Tichenor Rider (1814-1870)
  6. Arabella Rider (1815-1897).

Dickerman Allen Rider, sercond child of Jennings Rider and Sally Allen, was born October 11, 1808 in Whitingham, Windham, Vermont.. He married Almira Lilly (or Lillie or Lilley).

 

The only child I have now is Dickamon Allen Rider who married Cordelia Pratt (January 1, 1842-7 ?, 1928. They had four children:

  1. Homer Marchant Rider 1864-1916)
  2. Frank L Rider (1866- ?
  3. Clara May (Rider) Madiera (1868- ?)
  4. Jessie Mildred Rider (1871- ?)

As posted in a previous My Ancestors post, Homer Marchant Rider (January 6, 1864-November 23,1916) married Edith May Lewis (June 21, 1863-June 10,1961). He is my great-grandfather, father of Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin, the grandfather of Marian Dunlop (Irwin) Guion, my mother.  Now the Lewis, Rider, Irwin line goes all the way back to the Mayflower and William Bradford. Quite a surprise to me but a connection well worth mentioning.

Tomorrow I will begin a week of letters written in 1944. All five of Grandpa’s sons re scattered all over the world doing their part during World War II.

Judy Guion

 

 

My Ancestors (53 and 54) – Laurana Bradford and Elijah McFarland and (55 and 56) Hannah McFarland and Caleb Rider

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them. 

Governor William Bradford; (2) Joseph Bradford; (3)Elisha Bradford; (4)Laurana Bradford; (5) Hannah McFarland; (6) Jennings Rider; (8)Dickerman Allen Rider; (9) Dickamon Allen Rider; (10) Marian Edith Rider; (11) Marian Dunlap Irwin; (12)Judith Anne Guion

Two weeks ago, as I was going through the Lewis, Rider, Irwin folder where I started collecting information on these families in 1975, I came across a piece of paper that I had either forgotten about or did not notice.  It was sent to me by my mother’s sister, Margaret (Irwin) Mitchell Sedberry.  Her note at the bottom says, “This is from Virginia Rider, and she wrote, “You are now Mayflower descendants.”

I had known that my three daughters were Mayflower descendants through their father but never knew of my connection.  Needless to say I went exploring on the Internet.  For the next few Sundays I will be following this line from Governor William Bradford to Dickermon (various records have different spellings for this name) Allen Rider (1832 – 1904), whose descendants I have covered on previous Sundays.

(1)Laurana (Bradford) McFarland; (2) Hannah (McFarland) Rider; (3) Jennings Rider; (4) Dickeman Allen Rider; (5) Dickamon Allen Rider, (6) Homer Marchant Rider; (7) Marian Edith  (Rider) Irwin; (8) Mairian Dunlop (Irwin) Guion; (9) Judith Anne Guion

Laurane Bradfordl and, the fifth child of Elisha Bradford and Bathsheba Le Brocke, was born in 1726. She married Elijah McFarland (1722-1777) and they had thirteen children.

  1. Mary (molly) McFarland (1747-1815)
  2. David McFarland (1748 – 1778)
  3. Selma McFarland (1748 – deceased)
  4. Elijah McFarland (1749-1827)
  5. Abigail McFarland (1752-deceased)
  6. Hannah McFarland (1752-after 1812)
  7. Joseph McFarland (1753-1803
  8. Laurana McFarland (1755-1834)
  9. Sara McFarland (1757-deceased)
  10. Saba McFarland (1758-deceased)
  11. Mackfarling (1759-deceased)
  12. Sabra McFarland ( ? – ? )
  13. Asaba McFarland (deceased)

 

Hannah McFarland, sixth child of Laurana (Bradford) and Elijah McFarland Sr., was born in 1752 and married Caleb Rider (1746-deceased) on December 15, 1768. I have only found one child born to them:

  1. Jennings Rider (1780-1854).

Next Sunday I will continue this line of descent  from Jennings Rider to Homer Marchant Rider,

Tomorrow, I’ll begin a week of letters written in 1943. Lad and Marian are married and looking forward to the holidays.

Judy Guion