My Ancestors (38 and 39) – Marian Edith Rider and Mowry Addison Irwin

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (2) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (3) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (4) Judith Anne Guion

Homer Marchant Rider married Edith May Lewis on 29 July 1885 at Rider’s Ranch (near Coralitas, CA)

Their children were as follows:

  1. Homer Allen Rider, ,b. 8 Aug 1887 at the Rider Ranch
  2. Marian Edith Rider, b.  15 Oct 1888 at Santa Cruz
  3. Louise Rider, b.  12 Sept 1890 at Westport, CA
  4. Child died at birth
  5. Delo Margaret Rider, b. 7 Dec 1898 at Watsonville, CA
  6. Donald Lewis Rider, b. 16 Aug 1901

Marian Edith Rider was born 15 Oct 1888 at Santa Cruz, CA

She married Mowry Addison Irwin on 28 July 1914 in Watsonville, CA

Mowry Addison Irwin was born in Erie, PA on 16 Oct 1888

Mowry Addison Irwin, Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin, Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion and Alfred Peabody Guion 

They had the following children:

Marian Dunlap Irwin and Homer Addison Irwin about 1920

1.  Marian Dunlap Irwin, born 11 Nov 1915 in Sacramento, CA

2.  Homer Addison Irwin, born 24 April 1917 in Marysville, CA

3.  Margaret Edith Irwin, born 28  May 1920 in Oakland, CA

4.  Donald Mowry Irwin, born 3 July 1925 in Albuquerque,NM

Mowry Addison Irwin passed away on 10 May 1947.  He was a resident of Berkeley for 10 years.  Mr. Irwin and his family had moved to Orinda in 1940.  He was President last year and a Director this year of the Orinda Association and was instrumental in helping to start the Orinda News, a community newspaper.  He was employed for the past 15 years by the Westinghouse Wholesale Sales Co.

Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin passed away 8 June 1958.

Next Sunday I will be posting more information about Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion, my Mother. 

Tomorrow I will be posting a week of the memories of Grandpa and Grandma Guion’s children during their time in Trumbull.

Judy Guion 

 

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My Ancestors (36 and 37) – Edith May Lewis and Homer Marchant Rider continued

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (2) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (3) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (4) Judith Anne Guion

Edith May (Lewis) Rider

The following is a section of a letter written by Edith May Lewis to her daughter, Marian Rider Irwin, my mother’s mother, when she (Edith May Lewis) was in her 80s.

Grandpa Rider’s name was Dickamon Allen Rider.  He was from near Bennington, Vermont – and his older brother was Homer Rider – he had dark, very curly hair from picture – I think like Don’s ( my mother’s brother, Donald Irwin).  Mrs. Harnell, who knew the Riders when they came 1st to Cal. – Said Homer was a very nice looking boy – I think they were 22, 20 and 18 – Homer, Dick and Jesse.  She was very fond of Homer – said he was always kind – thoughtful – so neat and clean – and that the pictures didn’t look at all like him – except for the curly hair – He was drowned in the Feather River (I think it was) tho’ he was a very good swimmer.  The youngest was not well – so he went back home and later settled in Chicago.  The Harnell’s were from N.Y. state, very close to the Vermont line – where the Riders lived – I think the 3 – anyway the two older ones – boarded with them – She (Mrs. H.) was at the ranch for a visit when Alice was a baby

Mine is: born June 21, 1863 – Blue Earth Co., Minnesota

My father, John Jackson Lewis was born April 27, 1825 in Delaware.

My mother, Margaret Ann Wilde was born August 22, 1844 in New York City

Margaret Ann Wilde’s parents were William Wilde born in New York State.  He married Joanne Burke, born in England in 1825.  I will continue to read through the information from various members of my mother’s family together more information about these and other individuals.  I have a document that needs further research but it claims that the riders were descendants of William Bradford, Governor of Massachusetts from 1621 to 1650.  When I can verify the details I will let you know.

Tomorrow I will begin posting a week of letters written in 1944.  At this point all 5 boys are in the service of Uncle Sam.  Grandpa continues his weekly letters keeping everyone informed about the lives of his sons who are away from home. 

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (36 and 37)- Edith May Lewis and Homer Marchant Rider

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (2) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (3) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (4) Judith Anne Guion

Edith May (DeDe) (Lewis) Rider

 

Homer Marchant Rider

 

John Jackson Lewis married Margaret Ann Wilde (b.  August 22 or 24, 1844 in New York City, New York).

The children of John Jackson Lewis and Margaret Ann Wilde:

  1. Edith May Lewis, born June 21, 1863 in Sterling Center, Minnesota
  2. Alice Jackson Lewis, born September 28, 1866, Sterling Center Minnesota.
  3. William Edward Lewis born October 24, 1868, Pontiac, Illinois.
  4. Frank J. Lewis born February 6, 1871, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  5. Charles Bertrum Lewis born April 8, 1872, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  6. Margaret Lewis, died May 25, 1876 as an infant in Watsonville, California.

Dickamon Allen Rider (b. 17 Dec 1832, Bennington, VT) married Cordelia Eliza Pratt (b.5 Nov 1842, Kaosauqua (or Keokuk Iowa) on 1 Jan 1863, Grass Valley, CA).

Their children were:

  1. Homer Marchant Rider (b. 6 Jan 1869, Nicolaus, CA)
  2. Frank L. Rider
  3. Clara May (Rider) Madiera
  4. Jesse Mildred

Homer Marchant Rider married Edith May Lewis on 29 July 1885 at Rider’s Ranch (near Coralitas, CA)

Their children were as follows:

  1. Homer Allen Rider, ,b. 8 Aug 1887 at the Rider Ranch
  • Marian Edith Rider, b.  15 Oct 1888 at Santa Cruz
  • Louise Rider, b.  12 Sept 1890 at Westport, CA
  • Child died at birth
  • Delo Margaret Rider, b. 7 Dec 1898 at Watsonville, CA
  • Donald Lewis Rider, b. 16 Aug 1901

Next week, I will post information on Marian Edith Rider, my Grandmother and Mowry Addison Irwin, my Grandfather.

Tomorrow I will begin a week of posting letters written in 1943. We Are getting very close to the marriage of Lad (Alfred) and Marian Irwin, my Mom and Dad.

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (34) and (35) – Enoch Lewis (1776 – 1856) and John Jackson Lewis (1825 – 1919)

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

  • Enoch Lewis; (2) John Jackson Lewis; (3) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (4) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (5) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (6) Judith Anne Guion

Enoch Lewis was born January 29, 1776 in Radnor (Chester Co.), Pennsylvania.  He married Lydia Jackson, born April 27, 1825.  They had several children, the oldest, John Jackson Lewis was born April 27, 1825, in Wilmington, (New Castle Co.), Delaware.  two other sons were named Edward and William.

John Jackson Lewis was 25 years old when he embarked on his Voyage to California to visit his brother William in 1851.  William had a farm in San Jose, California.  (See Category “Voyage to California” on my blog:  greatestgenerationlessons.wordpress.com)

John Jackson Lewis married Margaret Ann Wilde (b.  August 22 or 24, 1844 in New York City, New York).

The children of John Jackson Lewis and Margaret Ann Wilde:

  1. Edith May Lewis, born June 21, 1863 in Sterling Center, Minnesota
  2. Alice Jackson Lewis, born September 28, 1866, Sterling Center Minnesota.
  3. William Edward Lewis born October 24, 1868, Pontiac, Illinois.
  4. Frank J. Lewis born February 6, 1871, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  5. 5 Charles Bertrum Lewis born April 8, 1872, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  6. Margaret Lewis, died May 25, 1876 as an infant in Watsonville, California.

This isn’t very much on these two ancestors but I intend to keep looking for more information. With all the information online, I should be able to find out a bit more.

Tomorrow and for the rest of the week, I’ll continue with the detailed descriptions found in the Log Book of the Helen.

Judy Guion

My Ancestor – Alfred Peabody Guion – Memory Book

 

On April 2, 2005, a few months after my Mom passed away, my siblings and I organized a gathering to celebrate them and their lives together.  We invited friends from the Marin Amblers, the RV group they had joined, friends from the Marin Power Squadron, friends from the Condo Complex where they had lived for 38 years and Mom’s relatives living in California.  My brother Greg had a friend who put together a slideshow of about 130 pictures, spanning Mom and Dad’s childhood, young adulthood, the war years when they met and married, their lives in Trumbull and their active lives in California.

I purchased a wire-bound journal and created the first page.  All those present were invited to write down their memories of Lad and Marian.  These are a few of the quotes from the 71 pages of memories and tributes.

From Mom’s sister, Peg:

….  Al was always interested in finding something that needed fixing — a big help to me and enjoyable to him.

From their grandson, Tim:

Since I can’t pick just one memory to share (there are so many) I wanted to share a handful of things that will always be with me:

Grandma – going to the park, her keychain money cup, teaching me to swim and her piano.

Grandpa – his lamp timers, reading the newspaper and driving the camper.

I learned many important lessons from Grandma and Grandpa: sense of family, adventure … I get great comfort knowing that they live in all of us forever.

From their granddaughter, Amy:

Grandpa, I miss your tinkering on the back patio and I miss your hugs.

Grandma, I miss your beautiful smile and your contagious laughter.

From their son-in-law, Ted:

I never heard them speak to each other with anything but respect and adoration.  I also realized that I never heard them speak about anyone in a negative tone.  They never complained about anything.

From their niece, Sandi:

I would do something and my mom and dad would look at me and say “She’s a lot like Sis.”  (Marian was known as Sis to her family)

From their son, Greg

Remembering how they lived their lives and maintained their relationships with our family and each other has better prepared me to go on with life and to focus on what’s important in my life.

From their granddaughter, Susan:

When I was 2 years old, our family came out to visit from Connecticut.  My twin sister Colleen and I were to take a nap ….  Somehow we got a hold of some crayons.  Well one thing led to another and well ….  the whole room as high as we could reach was decorated with swirls, lines, and pictures.  My mother was of course upset but my grandma, on the other hand thought …. ART.

From there granddaughter, Collene:

Grandma – a strong, courageous, understanding, adventurous woman.  She approached life head on living each day as she wanted – even if her body sometimes struggled.

Grandpa – a patient, hard-working, gentle man who loved to tinker.  He could just about fix anything.

From daughter-in-law, Euna:

This is my first memory of them, and one that is very dear to me.  It was the holidays and Greg asked me to go to his parent’s house.  I was very nervous, but as soon as we walked in the door, it was like we were already a part of the family.  They accepted my daughter as one of their grandchildren and made no difference between the kids, and that meant a lot to me.

From their son, Doug:

From Mom – a concern for others, a great outlook on life and how important family is.

From Dad – mechanical and building skills, patience and being a precisionist.

From their daughter, Lynn:

(Mom and I) have the same love of the piano.  We both enjoyed “playing by ear” because neither of us had any formal lessons.  We played just for our own enjoyment.  Your genuine respect for all others was always shining brightly and should be a model for everybody today.

From granddaughter, Alisha:

My fondest memory of Nana is of her racing my boys around the courtyard on her walker.  The shrilling laughter of 3-year-old boys as they screamed, “Go faster, go faster Nana” and she did.

From granddaughter, Caryn:

When I was 10 you took care of us ….  My mom was in a car accident and we stayed with you for a month and a half.  Every day was an adventure.  You showed us the sites of California like Lombard Street, the Pyramid building, Pier 39, Golden Gate Bridge, Mount Tamalpais, Golden Gate Park the luminarias and the Rainbow Tunnel.

From members of the Marin Power Squadron:

We have many wonderful memories of them both.  We will greatly miss them with their winning smiles.

We were members of the Santa Rosa Power Squadron but when we went to Marin Power squadron events, Marian was always at the door checking us in with her beautiful smile and happy attitude.  What a different world it would be if more people had such an “up” attitude as Marian.

Words cannot express the gratitude we members of the Marin Power Squadron have for the work you (Al and Marian) contributed to the betterment of our organization.

From members of the Marin Amblers RV Group:

Marian and Al’s handsome family through all the generations are their “legacy”.

Marian was a whiz with paper, scissors and a staple gun.  She did a fantastic job of making a great outfit for Al at a Halloween Outing ….  She made a Dalmatian dog costume for Al ….  He won the prize.

My fond memory of Marion is at her last birthday party.  She had the nicest smile on her face when we sing happy birthday.  She looked so cute in the Mexican hat.

Al and Marian were the first people we met when we joined the Marin Amblers.  They introduced us to all the members and soon we were on the road enjoying many outings with this great group – Al always had a big smile for everyone and he was devoted to Marian – she was his favorite lady…

Alfred Peabody Guion – the day he was Christened

 

Marian Irwin and her Great-Grandmother

 

                            

Lad in Venezuela

          Marian Dunlap Irwin – SFSU – 1937

 

Lad and Marian on their Wedding Day

Marian, Doug, Lad, Greg and Judy, 1947

Christmas card, 1952

 

Lad and Marian in California

Marian (Irwin) Guion and Alfred (Lad) Guion

Susan, Caryn, Judy (me) and Collene

Greg, Ted, AAron, Alisha, Amy, Greg, Euna and Tim

Doug, his wife Carol, Lynn

I realize this is probably one of my longest posts but it was difficult to edit the memories and stories that family and friends shared with us in the Memory Book.  I hope you have enjoyed getting to know my parents, Lad (or Al) and Marian, “up close and personal”.

Next Sunday I will begin tracing Marian’s ancestors.

My Ancestors (33l) – Alfred Peabody Guion – The End of the Story

 

As I sat down to write this post about my Dad and his life with Marian Irwin, I got caught up in reading the entries in their Memory Book.  This Memory Book was passed around at the Celebration of Their Lives we held for friends and family in California.

But I’m getting ahead of myself.  In September of 2002, the Marin Amblers monthly outing was a trip to Gold Beach, Oregon.  Dad was 89 (Mom was 88) and my brother Greg and his wife Euna tried to convince them that this trip might be a little too strenuous for them.  Dad’s reply was, “Marian really wants to go.”  Mom’s only response was, “But Al really would like to go.”  Greg and Euna thought they had succeeded in convincing them and came down on Saturday morning with the usual food for the next week and plans to clean the apartment, just as they did every Saturday.  They were quite surprised when they realized Mom and Dad were not home.  Greg went down to the back parking lot where their RV was kept and saw that it was gone.  They had left on Friday, as usual, to arrive for dinner Friday night.

On the drive north the RV had a flat tire.  They didn’t have a cell phone so they couldn’t call for road service.  They sat on the side of the road for hours until someone stopped and helped Dad change the tire.  They finally arrived four hours later than expected.

The group was thrilled to see them and they had a wonderful time visiting with friends for the weekend.  They planned to leave on Sunday and stop at a familiar campground once they had crossed into California.  When they arrived they discovered that the campground was closed for the season.  Not familiar with the area or other campgrounds nearby, they decided to drive another six hours to reach home.  Needless to say, they were both exhausted from the weekend.  I think it took a heavy toll from Dad and he didn’t recover completely.

In December Dad came down with the bad cold and just couldn’t shake it.  In his typically thorough way, on Sunday evening, December 21st, he arranged all the important papers and then told Mom that he thought he ought to go to the hospital because he wasn’t feeling well.  They treated him with antibiotics and on Tuesday he was feeling much better.  A nurse told him that if he kept this up, they were kicking him out on Wednesday.  As he was eating breakfast Wednesday morning, he aspirated something into his lungs and within a couple of hours he was in a coma in the ICU on Life Support.

Wednesday evening (Christmas Eve) when I got home from my last day at work as a seasonal cashier in a department store, there was a message on my answering machine from Greg, asking me to call him.  I immediately called and he explained what was going on.  I told him I would fly to California the next day.  My oldest daughter, Caryn, flew out with me on Christmas Day.

My sister Lynn arrived on Friday and we all went to see Dad in the hospital.  I spoke with his doctor who explained the seriousness of the situation.  He told me it would be a miracle if he came out of the coma and if he did, he would be in a vegetative state.  We had a family meeting when we got back to their apartment.  Mom told us that she did not want to see him like that again.  She wanted to remember him as he lived, full of life.  We made the decision to turn off Life Support.  Since technically I did not have a job to go back to, I told Mom that I would move to California to take care of her.  On Saturday, December 27th, Greg stayed with Mom and Doug, Lynn and I went to the hospital.  We had the staff remove Life Support and I sat holding Dad’s hand and talking to him until the end.

Caryn had flown home but I stayed until New Year’s Day.  I flew home, closed up my apartment, packed my car and drove back to California, arriving January 15th.

For the next year, Greg, Euna and I had our individual responsibilities.  Greg took care of the financial and estate business, Euna provided already prepared lunches and dinners and also cleaned the apartment.  I was on duty 24/7 covering daily duties, medications and doctor’s visits.

In December 2004, Mom developed an infection and I took her to the hospital.  She was there for a few days and was on the mend when she had another stroke.  A few hours later I was with her when she had a seizure.  I held her and told her I loved her and then she was gone.  She joined my father on December 16th, less than a year after my Dad had passed away

Next Sunday I will share quotes from the Memory Book and pictures of their lives together.

Tomorrow, I’ll begin a week of letters written in 1943, the brginning of the Love Story of Lad and Marian Guion.

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (33j) – Alfred Peabody Guion – Trumbull and Their Move to California

 

Marian and Lad Guion

For Lad and Marian Guion life in Trumbull was probably typical for families of that generation in a small town.  My Dad worked for the Frouge Construction Company in Bridgeport, Connecticut, through my high school years and beyond.

The Trumbull Congregational Church played a large part in our lives.  Both Lad and Marian sang in the choir.  When I was old enough I joined the Junior Choir and moved on to the Senior Choir when I went to high school.  My father grew up in the church along with many of his friends.  Their families were also active in the church.  My father, Uncle Dan and Uncle Ced sang in the Chandler Chorus and this group had gatherings for their members on numerous occasions.  At one picnic, my cousin and best friend and I stole a can of black olives, opened it and ate the whole can.  We still laugh about that.  I remember Christmas performances, Easter Sunrise services, Junior and Senior Pilgrim Youth Fellowship groups, weekend Retreats and the Strawberry Festival. My siblings and I participated in these events along with the children of Mom and Dad’s friends.

As mentioned in a previous post, Marian started a Kindergarten School with her close friend Jeanne (Hughes) Hayden, who grew up with my father.  They closed the school after the town of Trumbull started offering Kindergarten classes in their grammar schools.  Marian was very active in the Parent Teacher’s Association and was also elected to the Board of Education and served on the Construction Committee for Trumbull’s first Middle School.  She worked as an Enumerator for the Census Bureau during several of the Decennial Censuses.  I now work as a Permanent Part-time employee of the Census Bureau.  It has changed quite a bit since Mom worked for them.

Alfred Duryee Guion, 1884 – 1964

In the fall of 1964 Grandpa passed away at the age of eighty.  The Trumbull house was sold to Uncle Dan and Aunt Paulette and their family of eight moved into the section of the house that we had been living in.  Uncle Dave and Aunt Eleanor bought a house in Stratford and moved there with their two children.  My family moved into their apartment which was situated in the oldest section of the house.  I was off to college and came home occasionally on weekends.  My twin brother was drafted into the Army.

In 1966, the Frouge Construction Company was in the process of purchasing a large tract of land on the Pacific coast, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge.  Their plans were to build a community around the small bay and up the surrounding hills.  They sent Lad and Marian to California.  My younger brother, by only a year and half, and my sister, who had just graduated from high school, drove out to California with them.  My Dad’s job was to start clearing land for the proposed project. Mom and Dad found a nice apartment in a condominium complex and were quite happy.

Lad and Marian Guion in California

After driving out to California my brother returned to Connecticut to be drafted into the Army.  My sister went to college, married and provided Mom and Dad with their first grandchild.  After two years of college in Connecticut, I decided not to transfer to California but to complete my education in Connecticut.  I missed my family but I knew even then that I was a Connecticut Yankee through and through.

After about two years the proposed project died.  My Dad was hired as the Resident Handyman for the entire condominium complex.  He was very happy helping the residents and making repairs and improvements to the complex.

In California, Mom got a job with the Board of Education in a town across the Bay. She continued to work for many years.  Dad and Mom became active members of two different groups.

Marian and Lad wearing their Marin Ambler Vests

 

Lad and Marian at an Ambler Weekend – a fun side of them that I didn’t know in Trumbull

The first was an RV group called The Marin Amblers.  At least once a month the group would travel to some campground and enjoy a weekend of fellowship with friends.

Lad and Marian at a Marin Power Squadron dinner

The second group was the Marin Chapter of the Power Squadron.  Dad had been a member of a Connecticut Chapter and transferred his membership.  Both Mom and Dad became very active and served as officers at various times during their thirty-five years in California.

Next Sunday I’ll post the final chapter of Lad and Marian’s life together.

Tomorrow I’ll begin posting a week of the childhood memories of Grandpa’s and Grandma’s children.

Judy Guion