My Ancestors (38 and 39) – Marian Edith Rider and Mowry Addison Irwin

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (2) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (3) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (4) Judith Anne Guion

Homer Marchant Rider married Edith May Lewis on 29 July 1885 at Rider’s Ranch (near Coralitas, CA)

Their children were as follows:

  1. Homer Allen Rider, ,b. 8 Aug 1887 at the Rider Ranch
  2. Marian Edith Rider, b.  15 Oct 1888 at Santa Cruz
  3. Louise Rider, b.  12 Sept 1890 at Westport, CA
  4. Child died at birth
  5. Delo Margaret Rider, b. 7 Dec 1898 at Watsonville, CA
  6. Donald Lewis Rider, b. 16 Aug 1901

Marian Edith Rider was born 15 Oct 1888 at Santa Cruz, CA

She married Mowry Addison Irwin on 28 July 1914 in Watsonville, CA

Mowry Addison Irwin was born in Erie, PA on 16 Oct 1888

Mowry Addison Irwin, Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin, Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion and Alfred Peabody Guion 

They had the following children:

Marian Dunlap Irwin and Homer Addison Irwin about 1920

1.  Marian Dunlap Irwin, born 11 Nov 1915 in Sacramento, CA

2.  Homer Addison Irwin, born 24 April 1917 in Marysville, CA

3.  Margaret Edith Irwin, born 28  May 1920 in Oakland, CA

4.  Donald Mowry Irwin, born 3 July 1925 in Albuquerque,NM

Mowry Addison Irwin passed away on 10 May 1947.  He was a resident of Berkeley for 10 years.  Mr. Irwin and his family had moved to Orinda in 1940.  He was President last year and a Director this year of the Orinda Association and was instrumental in helping to start the Orinda News, a community newspaper.  He was employed for the past 15 years by the Westinghouse Wholesale Sales Co.

Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin passed away 8 June 1958.

Next Sunday I will be posting more information about Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion, my Mother. 

Tomorrow I will be posting a week of the memories of Grandpa and Grandma Guion’s children during their time in Trumbull.

Judy Guion 

 

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My Ancestors (36 and 37) – Edith May Lewis and Homer Marchant Rider continued

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (2) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (3) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (4) Judith Anne Guion

Edith May (Lewis) Rider

The following is a section of a letter written by Edith May Lewis to her daughter, Marian Rider Irwin, my mother’s mother, when she (Edith May Lewis) was in her 80s.

Grandpa Rider’s name was Dickamon Allen Rider.  He was from near Bennington, Vermont – and his older brother was Homer Rider – he had dark, very curly hair from picture – I think like Don’s ( my mother’s brother, Donald Irwin).  Mrs. Harnell, who knew the Riders when they came 1st to Cal. – Said Homer was a very nice looking boy – I think they were 22, 20 and 18 – Homer, Dick and Jesse.  She was very fond of Homer – said he was always kind – thoughtful – so neat and clean – and that the pictures didn’t look at all like him – except for the curly hair – He was drowned in the Feather River (I think it was) tho’ he was a very good swimmer.  The youngest was not well – so he went back home and later settled in Chicago.  The Harnell’s were from N.Y. state, very close to the Vermont line – where the Riders lived – I think the 3 – anyway the two older ones – boarded with them – She (Mrs. H.) was at the ranch for a visit when Alice was a baby

Mine is: born June 21, 1863 – Blue Earth Co., Minnesota

My father, John Jackson Lewis was born April 27, 1825 in Delaware.

My mother, Margaret Ann Wilde was born August 22, 1844 in New York City

Margaret Ann Wilde’s parents were William Wilde born in New York State.  He married Joanne Burke, born in England in 1825.  I will continue to read through the information from various members of my mother’s family together more information about these and other individuals.  I have a document that needs further research but it claims that the riders were descendants of William Bradford, Governor of Massachusetts from 1621 to 1650.  When I can verify the details I will let you know.

Tomorrow I will begin posting a week of letters written in 1944.  At this point all 5 boys are in the service of Uncle Sam.  Grandpa continues his weekly letters keeping everyone informed about the lives of his sons who are away from home. 

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (36 and 37)- Edith May Lewis and Homer Marchant Rider

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

(1) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (2) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (3) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (4) Judith Anne Guion

Edith May (DeDe) (Lewis) Rider

 

Homer Marchant Rider

 

John Jackson Lewis married Margaret Ann Wilde (b.  August 22 or 24, 1844 in New York City, New York).

The children of John Jackson Lewis and Margaret Ann Wilde:

  1. Edith May Lewis, born June 21, 1863 in Sterling Center, Minnesota
  2. Alice Jackson Lewis, born September 28, 1866, Sterling Center Minnesota.
  3. William Edward Lewis born October 24, 1868, Pontiac, Illinois.
  4. Frank J. Lewis born February 6, 1871, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  5. Charles Bertrum Lewis born April 8, 1872, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  6. Margaret Lewis, died May 25, 1876 as an infant in Watsonville, California.

Dickamon Allen Rider (b. 17 Dec 1832, Bennington, VT) married Cordelia Eliza Pratt (b.5 Nov 1842, Kaosauqua (or Keokuk Iowa) on 1 Jan 1863, Grass Valley, CA).

Their children were:

  1. Homer Marchant Rider (b. 6 Jan 1869, Nicolaus, CA)
  2. Frank L. Rider
  3. Clara May (Rider) Madiera
  4. Jesse Mildred

Homer Marchant Rider married Edith May Lewis on 29 July 1885 at Rider’s Ranch (near Coralitas, CA)

Their children were as follows:

  1. Homer Allen Rider, ,b. 8 Aug 1887 at the Rider Ranch
  • Marian Edith Rider, b.  15 Oct 1888 at Santa Cruz
  • Louise Rider, b.  12 Sept 1890 at Westport, CA
  • Child died at birth
  • Delo Margaret Rider, b. 7 Dec 1898 at Watsonville, CA
  • Donald Lewis Rider, b. 16 Aug 1901

Next week, I will post information on Marian Edith Rider, my Grandmother and Mowry Addison Irwin, my Grandfather.

Tomorrow I will begin a week of posting letters written in 1943. We Are getting very close to the marriage of Lad (Alfred) and Marian Irwin, my Mom and Dad.

Judy Guion

My Ancestors (34) and (35) – Enoch Lewis (1776 – 1856) and John Jackson Lewis (1825 – 1919)

Last June I read about a Challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and I was intrigued. I decided to take up the challenge. Some Ancestors may take more than one week, but I still intend to write about 52 Ancestors. I hope you enjoy reading about My Ancestors as much as I am looking forward to researching and writing about them.

  • Enoch Lewis; (2) John Jackson Lewis; (3) Edith May (Lewis) Rider; (4) Marian Edith (Rider) Irwin; (5) Marian Dunlap (Irwin) Guion; (6) Judith Anne Guion

Enoch Lewis was born January 29, 1776 in Radnor (Chester Co.), Pennsylvania.  He married Lydia Jackson, born April 27, 1825.  They had several children, the oldest, John Jackson Lewis was born April 27, 1825, in Wilmington, (New Castle Co.), Delaware.  two other sons were named Edward and William.

John Jackson Lewis was 25 years old when he embarked on his Voyage to California to visit his brother William in 1851.  William had a farm in San Jose, California.  (See Category “Voyage to California” on my blog:  greatestgenerationlessons.wordpress.com)

John Jackson Lewis married Margaret Ann Wilde (b.  August 22 or 24, 1844 in New York City, New York).

The children of John Jackson Lewis and Margaret Ann Wilde:

  1. Edith May Lewis, born June 21, 1863 in Sterling Center, Minnesota
  2. Alice Jackson Lewis, born September 28, 1866, Sterling Center Minnesota.
  3. William Edward Lewis born October 24, 1868, Pontiac, Illinois.
  4. Frank J. Lewis born February 6, 1871, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  5. 5 Charles Bertrum Lewis born April 8, 1872, Sterling Center, Minnesota
  6. Margaret Lewis, died May 25, 1876 as an infant in Watsonville, California.

This isn’t very much on these two ancestors but I intend to keep looking for more information. With all the information online, I should be able to find out a bit more.

Tomorrow and for the rest of the week, I’ll continue with the detailed descriptions found in the Log Book of the Helen.

Judy Guion

Voyage to California (43c) – John Jackson Lewis – More of the San Jose Valley

This is the last section of the final letter from John Jackson Lewis. This one is  to Edward, dated May 8th, 1851, describing the San Jose Valley and what he can see from his brother William’s farm. This sketch was made by John Jackson Lewis and enclosed with the letter.

 

Turning our gaze up the valley towards Monterey, the timber prevents our seeing much of the low land, except in the immediate vicinity of our house, that is within two or three miles, but beyond the timber, and distant, perhaps, five or six miles, the hills, comparatively low, but high notwithstanding, indicate that the valley becomes much narrower, and changes its course very materially.  Looking towards the Bay, the mountains fade away on either side, leaving us one place where we can look out on what I shall call the real horizon.

On the plain, in this direction, there is nothing essentially different from what is visible in other directions.  The same vast fields of grass and flowers, interspersed with spots of timber, or lines of it along the streams.  The timber on the plain is almost exclusively white and live oak, but in some places, dense thickets of Willows border the streams.

Distances on the plain are very deceptive.  This day two weeks, after sitting and writing a considerable portion of the day, I felt desirous to take a walk before supper, and pitching on a timbered spots, which I supposed, after making all due allowances, to be about a mile distant, as the extent of my excursion.  Pointing it out to Wm., I asked him if it was much more than a mile distant.  He replied in the negative, and I started.  The sun, I suppose, was about an hour high, and as I walked and walked towards the trees, the sun appeared to be making almost equal haste toward the horizon.  I reached the trees, however, and found several of them to be splendid Live Oaks, with lots of magpies, blackbirds, woodpeckers, and hanging birds hopping about them or flying from tree to tree, making the air vocal with their notes.  I stayed but a short time, and started back on a tall walk; but the sun had gone to rest; in the dusk of evening was upon me as I approached our humble abode.

I met with another rather curious instance of this deceptiveness.  Nearly all of the farm, (as will be explained more fully hereafter) is open to the plains, and the cattle that roam over them will occasionally trespass upon the land under cultivation.  In driving them off one day, I picked up a clod and threw at one that I thought very near to me, but, to my astonishment, it fell considerably short of its object.  I threw again, harder, but it still fell short, and it was only after repeated trials that I found how much harder I had to throw in order to hit anything that I had been accustomed to doing.  One reason of the deceptiveness in this instance was probably the being out of practice of throwing, for two or three months, reasons for other cases are perhaps found in the clearness of the atmosphere and the background of the mountains.  The rectangular figure on my map, near the Monterey Road and on a branch of the Guadalupe Bay, is where Wm. and his partners were farming last year.  one of them, Capt. Winslow, is on it this year.  He rents it, I believe, at $30. per acre.

 

This concludes the entries of the Diary and Journal of John Jackson Lewis concerning his voyage from New York to California to visit his brother William.

My Mother’s Ancestors will be the next series I post on Sundays. Here is a picture of Edith May Lewis, daughter of John Jackson Lewis and Margaret Ann Wilde.

Edith May (DeDe) Lewis, daughter of John Jackson Lewis.

 

This picture is of Homer Marchant Rider, Edith May’s husband.

Next Saturday I will begin a series of posts concerning Lad’s Voyage to Venezuela, taking a similar route as John Jackson Lewis during the first portion of his journey, about 88 years later.

Tomorrow my final post about My Ancestor, Alfred Peabody Guion. This will be quotes from the Memory Book that was passed around during the Celebration of Life held for Al (Lad) and Marian Guion.

Next week I will begin a week of letters written in 1944 while all five of Grandpa’s boys were scattered arount the world in the service of Uncle Sam.

Judy Guion

Trumbull – To Members of Medical Staff, Everywhere, Just Everywhere – October 17, 1943

 

This  letter includes a large portion of Grandpa’s dry wit as he tells the boys all about Lad’s fiance and asks quite a few questions, as he does quite often.

This picture was taken in about 1945 when a fellow serviceman of Lad’s visited the Trumbull House and took a few pictures – although he and Smokey are the subjects of this photo taken (probably) by Lad.

Trumbull Hospital, Clinic and Sanatorium

A.D. Guion, Chief Butcher

October 17, 1943

To members of medical staff

Everywhere, Just Everywhere

Greetings:

Last week we sent you a new package of our famous Cupid Serum specially developed by Dr. A. P. Guion of California. It is now time for a follow-up treatment. This one is stronger and more potent than the last. In fact, its effect is said to be permanent. It has been aging in the wood (my head) for about a week and is now ready for administering. Hold your chair, brace yourself. The needle, Dr. Watson. “Arrangements have been made, so far as is possible for a soldier, for us to be married at her home near San Francisco, on November 14th. We may have to suddenly changed plans but to date everything looks O.K.” Marian has an apartment in South Pasadena which they will continue to occupy, which, though small, will do, because neither of them will be there during the day. Indeed, its small size will be a convenience in that housekeeping problems will be simplified. Now I suppose you will be interested in the

Case History of Miss Marian Irwin

Marian Rider Irwin and Marian Dunlap Irwin - 1915

Marian (Rider) Irwin and Marian Dunlap Irwin

 Marian Dunlap Irwin - Berkley High School - 1933

Berkeley High School Graduate

Marian Dunlap Irwin - SFSU - 1937

San Francisco State University Graduate

She was born some 27 1/2 years ago on the West Coast, and is a college graduate. She taught school for a few years, after which she did some traveling, but whether she got as far as Connecticut the record fails to say. She then accepted the position she now holds as Executive Secretary of the Campfire Girls, and presumably, like Boy Scouts, can start fires without matches, so that Lad will not suffer from lack of hot meals. She has one sister (married, so you bachelors need not let any false hopes arise) and a married brother. Her father, whom the prospective bridegroom has not yet met, is a factory distributor for Westinghouse (did somebody mention an electric toaster for a wedding present?). In spite of the fact that Marian is in an electrically minded family, Lad writes “things have been running like a well-built turbine — direct connected, I assume.

P.S. to Marian: under separate cover last week I mail you a photo of my eldest son, so you can see what you are getting, through the camera’s eye. Object, matrimony. (That gives me an idea — perhaps I’ll start a matrimonial bureau for my other unmarried sons).

Lad: you did pretty well in covering some of the high spots, but to complete the record, here are a few questions that occur to one: Will it be an afternoon or evening wedding? Will you wear your uniform? As long as I cannot officiate as Justice of the Peace in California, I assume it will not be a “justice” wedding but at her home by a clergyman. (Episcopal or some other denomination?) Can you secure a long enough leave to permit any sort of honeymoon, and if so, what and where? Are you driving to Frisco in the Buick or going by train? Do you need any money? (Foolish question). How much? What did you do about an engagement ring? Will Marian be entitled to the $50 wife allowance monthly from the Army, or does this happen only when the soldier is married before he starts working for Uncle Sam? What would you like for a wedding present? (Better let Marion answer about 75 % of this one).  Would you like me to send you any of your belongings? What are your plans, or perhaps we had better say, hopes, after the war is over? And by the way, while we have that small photo of Marian, I don’t know whether she is short or tall, blonde or brunette, plump or slim (I know your answer to this one – “just right”). Whether she has voted for Roosevelt all her life, and still intends to do so the rest of her life, and whether she likes a father-in-law with Hay Fever? Oh I could go on and on, but real generous answers to these few questions as a starter will do for now. You can think of a lot of other things I’d like to know. There is one thing I do know and that is one month and one week from today I am going to feel like a very distant relative. In my wildest dreams I have never envisioned the fact that anyone of my boys would be married without my being there to help shove him off the dock into the sea of matrimony. That just shows to go you, that you can’t count on anything for certain in this old universe — a runaway married daughter, A hand-tied son and now this one by remote control. I know how busy you both will be from now on until the big day, but if you, one or both, can seek a few minutes to write more it will do somewhat in taking the disappointment out of the fact we can’t be on hand to throw a few handfuls of rice.

Tomorrow, the conclusion of this letter.

Judy Guion

Voyage to California (43b) – John Jackson Lewis – Description of the San Jose Valley

This is the second  section (of three) of a letter from John Jackson Lewis  to Edward, dated May 8th, 1851, describing the San Jose Valley and what he can see from his brother William’s farm. This sketch was made by John Jackson Lewis and enclosed with the letter.

 

Between us and the coast range the view across the plain is uninterrupted, saved by occasional patches of oak timber, the nearest of them distant from 2 to 5 miles.  Some distance up the valley where the ground begins to rise, there is a large body of timber, but in general, timber is very scarce on the plain except immediately along the streams. Three weeks ago the plain in front of us was covered for miles with yellow daisy in full bloom, now the flowers are chiefly gone, and the seed vessels mingled with the dying grass have changed its color to a kind of mixed green and brown, while between that and the low hills at the base of the mountain there is an extensive plain now covered with mustard in full bloom.  These mountains at this distance present the appearance of a mighty bank of hills commencing with small ones and rising gradually until they reach the height of 3600 feet above the level of the ocean.  They are mostly destitute of timber, but some of them are thinly timbered to their very summit, and in some places solitary trees stand out in bold relief between us and the horizon.  In many places dark lines of timber, indicating the courses of the mountain streams, wind their serpentine courses down the sides of the mountains, sometimes losing themselves behind the hills, and again emerging from their retreat, until they reach the valley.  The hills nearest us generally present a rounded appearance, gradually becoming more precipitous and abrupt as they approach the mountains, and are mostly covered with wild oats, but in some places considerable patches of bright yellow have made their appearance within a week or two; these I supposed to be mustard.  These hills are continually changing in color, and I understand will continue to change through the summer.  In the spring some of them were covered with wild oats that escaped the fires last summer, while others that the fires had cleared were green with the young oats.  Through the summer we shall have the various changes produced by the different stages of growth, and also those produced by the fires which almost invariably clear off a portion of this valley annually; but of these when I witness them.  I often look at these mountains and long to scale their rugged sides, to stand on the summit of the loftiest, and enjoy the prospect that I know would lie before me, a prominent feature of which would probably be the great Sierra.  On the side of the house next to the Santa Cruz Mountains, the first object that meets the eye is a tract of perhaps 100 acres of mustard in full bloom, between us and the creek.  Beyond the mustard the line of trees that mark the course of the Coyote half a mile distant, meets the eye.  From the rise in the ground to the creek and the falling away on the other side, the plain itself is hidden from our view; but immediately opposite to us, where the trees along the Coyote admit of seeing between them, a dense body of timber and thicket along a branch of the Guadalupe, distant a mile from the Coyote, completely cuts off any further view of the low lands. One or two miles up the valley, the hills, which are called low, but which one finds pretty high and steep when he undertakes to climb them, commence.  These or the one I was on, consist of a hard gravelly soil, with a very scanty vegetation.  Some of them have a few small, stunted live oaks and a species of the horse chestnut upon them, but generally they are destitute even of these, while high above the hill and wood, frowns the dark mass of the Santa Cruz Mountains.  These are clothed with Redwood or Cedar, to their summits, gives them a dark, gloomy appearance.  On looking towards them, my first impression is still, nearly always, that a tremendously black thundercloud is rising in that quarter.  There is a high peaked among them, which S. Day, Wm.  and myself would all like to visit, and we may possibly do it if a slack time ever comes to us.  From it we could probably see far out on the Pacific, and get a fine view of the Bay, the valley of San Jose, the Coast Range etc. etc., ad infinitum, and I don’t know much else.  This peak, I suppose, is not more than 20 or 25 miles distant. Wm.  and I have projected a ride over the mountains to Santa Cruz, where Mrs. Farnham resides, but when we shall get it accomplished is uncertain.

On Sunday, the first part of a two-part tribute to My Ancestors, Lad and Marian Guion, my Mom and Dad.

Starting on Monday, a week of letters written in 1943. Plans are solidifying quickly for Lad and Marian. 

Judy Guion